Hugh's War on Waste

edited 4 March 2016 at 11:32AM in Old Style MoneySaving
603 replies 71.5K views
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  • CaterinaCaterina Forumite
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    Part of the Furniture Combo Breaker I've been Money Tipped!
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    Well, it's making me get my a** out of bed and go to buy eggs at the farmers market instead of the supermarket (the veg already come from a local farm delivery box) so it has had an impact on my behaviour.
    Finally I'm an OAP and can travel free (in London at least!).
  • GreyQueenGreyQueen Forumite
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    :) Just did your survey, pet, good luck with your project.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)
  • CaterinaCaterina Forumite
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    Part of the Furniture Combo Breaker I've been Money Tipped!
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    Survey done, best wishes with your studies, Shailen!
    Finally I'm an OAP and can travel free (in London at least!).
  • JustamumJustamum Forumite
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    I must be dim - I can't find the URL link on his profile.

  • pm2326pm2326 Forumite
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    Hi, my name is Shailen and I am a Product Design student at Loughborough University.

    I am researching into household food waste for my final year design project, and looking into potential opportunities in prolonging the life of certain foods.

    The show has given me some great insights on food waste in the home but I would like get responses from you.

    I have created a questionnaire to further my research and would really appreciate it if you could complete it, it won't take long! (The SurveyMonkey link can be found on my profile, Home Page URL)

    If you have any questions feel free to contact me.

    Cheers!

    Just done survey, good luck with your studies!
  • AubreyMacAubreyMac Forumite
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    I have just finished watching both shows & not read this thread in its entirety.

    I admit I'm very bad at recycling in my current flat.

    Where I lived before in a house, we had our own 3 bins just by the front door. A brown bin for food & garden waste that gets collected weekly, blue bin for plastic & cardboard and a green bin for other stuff. The blue and green bin were collected fortnightly. As they were our own bins and right by doorstep there's no reason to not separate & recycle. With 5 adults in that house the bins get too full if we don't put them in the right place.

    Where I live now is a flat, a lot are council tenants. I live alone and own that flat. The communal bin area is a black in for each flat and a big shared bin for recyclables. It seems everyone chuck things at any available bin regardless of the door number that's painted there, it pees me off to see other peoples rubbish in my own bin. The big recycle bin is used as an extension to any other bin - wrong things are always put there and as it's a big bin it is easier to chuck bulky (sometimes electrical) items in it. i have very little incentive to recycle when others don't play nicely so now I just put everything in 1 bag and in any bin.

    With regards to the wasted veg on the show, why does a veg that's too big mean it can't make carrot batons or cubes?

    Are parsnip & carrot soup/juice/mash etc only made from perfectly shaped veg? I don't believe it.
  • GreyQueenGreyQueen Forumite
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    :)AubreyMac, ther's no reason why wonky or large veg can't be cubed or juiced but there are issues. If you refer to the farm featured on Hugh's programme, they were growing, lifting, washing and bagging whole parsnips and the packing side of it was very basic.

    Big veg packhouse operations, such as those who will have the machinery to slice and dice, are a major investment and far beyond the pockets of most farmers.I recall from reading around the subject that there is often a contractural obligation on growers not to do business with anyone other than the contracted company. These exclusive deals mean that if, as Morries were caught doing, the contracting company changes the quantity at the last minute, or sends it back to the farm, it isn't possible to get those veg to a soup manufacturer or packhouse. And the diced veg are mostly sold in supermarkets, as fresh or as frozen, and those will be involved in their own supply chains with the supermarkets with their own growers................ it's complicated. Parsnips and carrots can sit happily in the ground for months but once lifted and washed, you are only days away from having good food rot.

    ************

    Re your refuse and recycling problems at your flats, as another flat dweller with shared bins (I'm one of those dreadful council tenants btw, we're all types of people from all walks of life who just happen to be poor, not a homogenous mass ;)) I have every sympathy. Your crews up at your recycling plant will have seen all sorts; live ammo, hand grenades, unexploded fireworks, samurai swords and more random objects (inc dead animals) than you would believe possible. When you're hand-hoiking several soiled disposable nappies out of the recycling every minute, a small electrical or five is no biggie, believe me. Any day which doesn't involve a visit from the bomb disposal squad is a good day.

    Small dead animals should be planted, if possible, otherwise double-bagging and putting them in general refuse or streetbins is acceptable. There may be a humourous book called 101 Uses of a Dead Cat, but the councils aren't set up to handle them.:)

    Ping an email across to your council and they'll have someone whose job is to encourage recycling. They may also do bin auditing, which is just about what you'd think it is (there are several fun jobs in local authorities, and this is one of them :p). If they can find out the perpetrators of the bin misuse, they may be able to visit and discuss it with them.

    Failing that, they could choose to do a mailout to the whole block, to remind people of what should be going in what bin.

    Trying to change people's behaviour is very hard, but that doesn't mean that it's impossible.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)
  • AubreyMacAubreyMac Forumite
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    GreyQueen wrote: »
    :)
    ************

    Trying to change people's behaviour is very hard, but that doesn't mean that it's impossible.

    What do you think it'll take for that to happen?

    Hugh's programme mentioned how much councils would save if everyone recycled (£25m if I recall correctly).

    I think if councils can promise and guarantee a reduction in council tax if we hit recycling targets than that might encourage people more.

    Also, the council I lived in before did not charge to pick up bulky items and gave out food recycle bags for free. The council I live in now do not give food bags (we don't even have a food bin) and charges £15 to pick up a bulky item. It is no surprise that I see more fly tipping here. If I had to get rid of something big that I can carry, like a printer, microwave or leftover carpet then I would rather bin it in the wrong place than pay £15 each item.
  • NewShadowNewShadow Forumite
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    Ultimately the easiest way to change behaviour is for the individual to be committed to the change - They understand the need to change, know how to change and what it will mean to them, are determined to change, and are able to implement the required changes.

    Recycling, losing weight, stopping smoking, being debt free - they're all the same thing as far as behaviour change is concerned.

    Unfortunately, while the vast majority would like to change, ultimately people do what's easiest.

    While councils continue to implement excessively complicated systems (5 different bins take far too much space for most to keep close to hand), or operate punitive systems (reward and encouragement promote greater engagement), people will resist changing.

    If you're interested in behaviour change or nudge theory, you might find this interesting reading:

    http://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/publications/mindspace
    That sounds like a classic case of premature extrapolation.

    House Bought July 2020 - 19 years 0 months remaining on term
    Next Step: Bathroom renovation booked for January 2021
    Goal: Keep the bigger picture in mind...
  • joedenisejoedenise Forumite
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    My DH thinks he ought to do something about the huge waste in restaurants. Maybe they should give that food to homeless people after closing time.

    Denise
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