TV License Warning Letter

in Phones & TV
16 replies 7.8K views
Hello,

I just moved into a new rented house a few weeks ago. I wasn't planning on buying a TV license, as I rarely watch live TV, but I decided to go ahead and buy one anyway, so I could watch Dr Who on iplayer live. Prior to this I hadn't watched any live TV.

Today I got letter from the TV licensing people, it was addressed to "the legal occupier", so I assumed they'd sent me my license in the post (even though I told them to email it to me). It was in fact a warning letter saying I hadn't responded to their previous letters, and what to expect if I'm summoned to court. Well I hadn't received any previous letters, so I'm guessing it was the previous tenants who were at fault. I'm not sure what to do, should I ring the licensing people and explain the situation?
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Replies

  • Ian011Ian011 Forumite
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    Presumably you have paperwork that proves when you moved in and where you were before...
  • Ignore it.

    We get one every month. Nothing happens.

    But if you do in fact require a TV license I would look into getting one ASAP.
  • teddysmumteddysmum Forumite
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    LazyTyper wrote: »
    Ignore it.

    We get one every month. Nothing happens.

    But if you do in fact require a TV license I would look into getting one ASAP.
    I think the OP has already bought a licence, over the internet.


    The licensing people are probably trying to contact the previous occupant, whose name they don't know.
  • teddysmum wrote: »
    I think the OP has already bought a licence, over the internet.

    So he did, misread that as "bought a TV anyway" :-)

    Anyway, those threatening letters are standard and don't mean anyone is definitely being taken to court. They are one of several off-the-shelf letters they continuously send out to try and scare people into getting in touch.
  • JJ_EganJJ_Egan Forumite
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    ( I wasn't planning on buying a TV license, as I rarely watch live TV, )

    Rarely still requires a valid licence .
  • silverwhistlesilverwhistle Forumite
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    JJ_Egan wrote: »
    ( I wasn't planning on buying a TV license, as I rarely watch live TV, )

    Rarely still requires a valid licence .

    but I decided to go ahead and buy one anyway

    Is that to help everyone in general or the OP who bought a licence? :-)
  • jr1985 wrote: »
    Hello,

    I just moved into a new rented house a few weeks ago. I wasn't planning on buying a TV license, as I rarely watch live TV, but I decided to go ahead and buy one anyway, so I could watch Dr Who on iplayer live. Prior to this I hadn't watched any live TV.

    Today I got letter from the TV licensing people, it was addressed to "the legal occupier", so I assumed they'd sent me my license in the post (even though I told them to email it to me). It was in fact a warning letter saying I hadn't responded to their previous letters, and what to expect if I'm summoned to court. Well I hadn't received any previous letters, so I'm guessing it was the previous tenants who were at fault. I'm not sure what to do, should I ring the licensing people and explain the situation?

    I get this letter ones every 3 months and i just put it in the bin, i dont have TV, BB or anytime to waste on this TV licensing people.

    So just ignore it.
    What happens if you push this button?
  • JJ_EganJJ_Egan Forumite
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    Is that to help everyone in general or the OP who bought a licence? :-)


    Read what the OP said .
    (I wasn't planning on buying a TV license, as I rarely watch live TV, )
    Rarely might be not very often but not never .
    Problem is that there are a lot of people out there saying i read on a forum i don't need a licence .
  • CornucopiaCornucopia Forumite
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    BBC/TVL scatters these letters around like threatening confetti (90 million in a good year).

    Generally, they are not worth the paper they are written on, though if you have a Licence and still receive them, it could mean the database is either messed up, or slow responding.

    Three choices -

    - ignore it on the basis you have a Licence. (might want to double-check)

    - contact them now to check/complain.

    - contact them in 6-8 weeks to check/complain if you receive more letters. (IIUC, it can take that long for the letters to be stopped once they have gone into the monthly enforcement cycle(*)).

    (*) Yes, they send letters monthly - they know no shame.
    ex Board Guide

  • edited 24 October 2015 at 4:11PM
    footyguyfootyguy Forumite
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    edited 24 October 2015 at 4:11PM
    jr1985 wrote: »
    Hello,

    I just moved into a new rented house a few weeks ago. I wasn't planning on buying a TV license, as I rarely watch live TV, but I decided to go ahead and buy one anyway, so I could watch Dr Who on iplayer live. Prior to this I hadn't watched any live TV.

    Today I got letter from the TV licensing people, it was addressed to "the legal occupier", so I assumed they'd sent me my license in the post (even though I told them to email it to me). It was in fact a warning letter saying I hadn't responded to their previous letters, and what to expect if I'm summoned to court. Well I hadn't received any previous letters, so I'm guessing it was the previous tenants who were at fault. I'm not sure what to do, should I ring the licensing people and explain the situation?

    "The legal occupier" cannot be sommoned to court; they can only issue a summons in your name.

    As you now have a TV license at your address, they won't bother you again (well whilst it remains valid). :)

    Even if you didn't have TV license, they would not summons you to court unless they had evidence of you watching TV etc for which a TV license is required.

    Remember, under UK law, you are presumed innocent until proven otherwise.
    It is for the prosecution/claimant to prove their case, not for you to disprove it.
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