We'd like to remind Forumites to please avoid political debate on the Forum. This is to keep it a safe and useful space for MoneySaving discussions. Threads that are - or become - political in nature may be removed in line with the Forum’s rules. Thank you for your understanding.

MSE News: Energy prices set to rise, experts say

Options
13»

Comments

  • Smiley_Dan
    Options
    oldskoo1 wrote: »
    And end up with stale air, no air flow and even damp?
    Well, if you take no precautions for such things, sure.

    Most houses in the UK are built to such a poor standard that stale air is not a problem. Gaps around cables, gaps around pipes, gaps between plasterboard and wall, gaps gaps gaps. No, the primary causes of condensation in such cases are cold faces, caused by a lack of insulation, or thermal bridging across the thermal envelope.

    If you *do* experience condensation due to lack of ventilation, then in a way that's a good thing (in the sense that it shows you are getting air tight)... it's time to install a ventilation system! Ideally whole house, but single room is possible. These should contain heat exchangers so as much of the air you have heated as possible will be retained.

    Like it or not, the building industry in the UK are going to have to step up.
  • waqasahmed
    Options
    Smiley_Dan wrote: »
    Bear in mind that the UK is actually on the cheaper side when it comes to energy prices, at least compared to the rest of Europe. At some point that discrepancy may even itself out.

    That said, things can change surprisingly in the energy market. The shale gas revolution in the US was not widely predicted, but had an enormous effect.

    For me though it's about mitigating risk. If you are not cutting your energy usage by insulating, moving to less energy hungry appliances or generating your own energy, and energy prices rise steeper still, you will only have yourself to blame. The warning signs are there and have been there for at least two decades now!

    This. 4/5 years ago, people were pretty reluctant to change from incandescent bulbs to CFL's. This was the first MASSIVE reduction on bills that people saw. They weren't widely adopted due to the price (Even though the maths says that they pay back after a mere 4 months from incandescents) 9 months, tops

    Today, LED bulbs are also pricey, but they are definitely worth it. For myself, Im replacing them slowly (Except in the last flat where it had all incandescent bulbs), because the payback period is a lot slower (3 - 5 years) due to having CFL's every where

    I'll eventually get laser light bulbs, if the maths works out, and if they start producing them in things other than BMW i8 headlights! (They also look bloody fancy!)

    Now light bulbs use hardly any energy (even the CFL's) so the next things to look for are your "heavy" appliances. Old TV's are worth upgrading for instance - I've tried to explain that one to my parents.

    We have a TV that consumes 250W of power - it's around 6/7 years old. The newer TV's consume a mere 40-50W of power (on paper) In reality, they will consume around 20-25W.



    I should add that the "main" TV is on for most of the day...

    My own little TV is rated at 25W and tends to use a mere 16W to power it

    It's people not doing the maths, or thinking "Oh !!!!. This costs HOW MUCH?"
  • Smiley_Dan
    Options
    You can compare appliances to do a payback calculation at http://www.sust-it.net/

    I find quite big savings by going for modern freezers and fridges.

    There are of course arguments to be made about the embodied energy etc, but in most cases it's best to go for something that will continue to derive energy savings over the long term. That's certainly the case for insulation anyway....
  • waqasahmed
    Options
    Smiley_Dan wrote: »
    You can compare appliances to do a payback calculation at http://www.sust-it.net/

    I find quite big savings by going for modern freezers and fridges.

    There are of course arguments to be made about the embodied energy etc, but in most cases it's best to go for something that will continue to derive energy savings over the long term. That's certainly the case for insulation anyway....

    After a certain level of efficiency, it seems a bit pointless as far as money saving is concerned

    ie: A+ to A++ There's usually a good 10 years payback period to go from A+ to A++ and definitely A+++

    They should really have rated things down instead of simply adding a + sign, but thats something else :)
  • Smiley_Dan
    Options
    Yeah, but my old appliances were more like Z--- before I looked to change :D
  • RMS2
    RMS2 Posts: 335 Forumite
    Options
    waqasahmed wrote: »
    This. 4/5 years ago, people were pretty reluctant to change from incandescent bulbs to CFL's. This was the first MASSIVE reduction on bills that people saw.


    Funny that. My bill only seems to go up, not down.


    But then the advisors in charge of government policy are all making a mint out of GREEN tax and they have been investigated or asked to stand down.
  • lstar337
    lstar337 Posts: 3,442 Forumite
    First Anniversary Name Dropper First Post Combo Breaker
    Options
    Smiley_Dan wrote: »
    Yeah, but my old appliances were more like Z--- before I looked to change :D
    Same here! :D

    Our A+ fridge freezer and A++ washing machine have saved us loads.
  • waqasahmed
    Options
    RMS2 wrote: »
    Funny that. My bill only seems to go up, not down.


    But then the advisors in charge of government policy are all making a mint out of GREEN tax and they have been investigated or asked to stand down.

    This is a fair enough point, but they'd be going up a lot higher if you still had your old appliances. Seriously if you do the maths, it's cheaper to buy the new,sell the old

    The gov't making money from the green tax could be a whole new topic - you could say that they're a necessity to fund an alternative energy industry, in a post fossil fuel world, and you could equally say that it's just a tax, like any other.

    Also, as the world becomes richer, expect energy prices to go up - fortunately the price of fuel at the pump has stayed the same for around a year and a half now though!
This discussion has been closed.
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 344.8K Banking & Borrowing
  • 250.6K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 450.4K Spending & Discounts
  • 236.9K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 610.8K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 173.9K Life & Family
  • 249.7K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.9K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards