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What Can I Grow In July??

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
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  • Gingham_RibbonGingham_Ribbon Forumite
    31.5K posts
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    Welcome, mutantk! I think you'll get more answers in our greenfingered board so I'll move you over there.
    May all your dots fall silently to the ground.
  • Linda32Linda32 Forumite
    4.4K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
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    Hi,

    I thought I'd better add this, which I'd previously PM'ed since I see its been added to the weekly email


    Carrots do brilliantly in pots, I'd go for the stumpy sort. The reason they do well in pots is because they don't like stony soil, this is what makes rude veg :rotfl: when they hit a stone and sprout off in another direction.

    So obviously in a pot you control the compost. Grow bags are fine for this and cheap, you just tip the soil in.
    Sow in a line or circle, use your finger and make a little row about 1/2 inch deep, sprinkle your seeds thinly and pinch the row together, using your fore finger and thumb, sort of cover over. Hope that makes sense.

    Keep watered but don't feed.

    Then when they come up you can thin them out and eat these raw, that way the remaining one's have room to grow.

    The reason I say grow in a row is so that you can see whats weeds and whats carrots. You will get weeds :D

    Brocolli, we are growing purple sprouting broc. This takes a while and is started off abit earlier than this and is a winter veg.

    Strawberries, you might still find plants in the garden centres/nurseries, one plant to a pot.

    As they grow, put some pet bedding (wilkinsons £2.00'ish for big bag) underneath the plant or bricks will do. This keeps the fruit off the soil.

    You must net strawberries as the birds like them as well and you will loose all of them.

    The plants last for about 3-4 years. But you can make new plants from the old one's. I'll tell you how to do that in due course if you want.

    You will get a better crop after the first year.

    Peppers, these like to be fed with tomato food, don't be tempted to feed to oftern, once a week is fine.
    They don't like the wet weather as I have found out :rolleyes: so they need some sort of protection.

    Depending on what sort of cost you want to go too, you can buy clotches, sort of plastic hats with vents in the top or long covers from Garden Centres/wilkinsons/B&Q

    Cabbage, -Spring/Red/Winter, we've grown spring cabbage before which you can start Sept/Oct time for next spring.

    You can start of with seeds or young plants. Young plants are more expensive, but the work is done for you. Seeds are cheaper but you have to do the work :confused: These don't need much work as far as growing goes, but again they need netting as you will loose the crop overnight - birds.

    Hope that helps a bit.
  • angeliamangeliam Forumite
    3 posts
    Thank you Lynda - a great deal of v useful & practical information.

    One tip from me - if you have cats that love Nepeta (catmint) grow it under an old upturned wire-mesh hanging basket. They'll be able to enjoy the outside leaves but not wreck the whole plant.

    And yes please - how to successfully grow new starwberry plants from old. It's going to be vital after this year's disastrous crop.
  • SarahjoviSarahjovi Forumite
    1K posts
    angeliam wrote: »

    And yes please - how to successfully grow new starwberry plants from old. It's going to be vital after this year's disastrous crop.


    I'm currently getting loads of runners from my Strawberry plants, and I am pegging the newly grown plants in pots of compost and then cutting the runner, once they have established!

    My question is, do I keep the new plants in the pots until next year or will it be better to plant them in the ground?

    Sarah:D
  • katskornerkatskorner Forumite
    3K posts
    You can grow swede, carrots, lettuce, radish, salad leaves mixtures, pak choi, rocket, beetroot right now. I just planted more carrots, spring onions, and my swede and second lot of pak choi the other day. I will be doing more lettuce and radish shortly too.

    Just prep the soil well before you plant to get the best crops. I tend to start my leafy stuff in trays and then transplant to give them a better chance against slugs and snails.
    3 kids(DS1 6 Nov, DS2 8 Feb, DS3 24 Dec) a hubby and two cats - I love to save every penny I can!
    :beer:
  • katskornerkatskorner Forumite
    3K posts
    Sarahjovi wrote: »
    I'm currently getting loads of runners from my Strawberry plants, and I am pegging the newly grown plants in pots of compost and then cutting the runner, once they have established!

    My question is, do I keep the new plants in the pots until next year or will it be better to plant them in the ground?

    Sarah:D

    I would keep them in the pots for now and give them a good chance to root well. Then plant them out later in the autmn in a sheltered spot with mulch or straw on top to protect and overwinter them. Then you can move them to cropping position next season.
    3 kids(DS1 6 Nov, DS2 8 Feb, DS3 24 Dec) a hubby and two cats - I love to save every penny I can!
    :beer:
  • SuzySFSuzySF Forumite
    118 posts
    Hi this year i've got potatoes in pots (quite large) one plant to a pot, dwarf french beans in tubs (long tubs about 10" deep) and peas in the brick raised bed which is a great shape for poles - get nice sweetpea type flowers at the front of the house AND food !!
    also,for the first time I've got outdoors tomatoes (usually in a small FREECYCLED greenhouse) i have one in there it a small plum i'm trying. also got sweet peppers (not chilies) in there this year. also got cut and come again lettuce in the bed with the peas.

    cropping french beans now 6 weeks in, but just sown some seeds yesterday for a 2nd lot be ready to put in pots in couple of weeks (fingers crossed). done away totally with patio flowering plants this year and done veg...next year eyeing up hanging basket strawberries and tomatoes ...:)

    as another poster said- plant what you like to eat !!
    What goes around - comes around
    give lots and you will always recieve lots
  • energy129energy129 Forumite
    6 posts
    Hi,
    Lots of things. All the salad leaves, carrots, swiss chard, beetroot, beans, herbs. You can still buy tomato plants but don't get any that look very tall and thin.
    I suggest you buy a magazine - Grow Your Own or Kitchen Garden are both good but come out a month ahead so look for a July copy.
    There are loads of books in the libraries. I like Joy Larkom and Sarah Raven.
    Best of luck, Jo
  • Lady_SaraLady_Sara Forumite
    2 posts
    I have found that the HDRA website is fantastic for this sort of thing:
    http://www.gardenorganic.org.uk/
    In the left hand bar is exactly what you need! It tells you what to do in your:
    In your: Incredibly useful!

    Roberta
  • jomknightjomknight Forumite
    32 posts
    Part of the Furniture Combo Breaker
    You might be able to buy a courgette plant if it is not too late. One plant produsces loads. Plant it in good compost & grass clippings and on a slight mound so that IF you have to water it the water will soak down to the roots and not rot the stem. Remove any flowers that appear if they are not pregnant with a baby courgette behind them but are on a thin stalk.
    American land cress seeds might start now- you may have to go organic to get them. The cress tastes like watercress. It keeps self seeding and goes on forever. lettuce sow a salad bowl variety in gro bag or container, you pick the leaves and they regrow. Longterm planning plant a thornless blackberry in the autumn against a trellis or fence with wires it will give you more and more fruit each year after the first couple of years. Allow room for it to spread 10ft and in the late summer remove branches which produced fruit and tie in the new long ones
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