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£214 for antenatal class...eek!

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135

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  • eyelinerprincess
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    We did the NHS ones, and didn't even prepare me for my son's actual birth (11 days late, induced, waters broke at 11pm, had him at 4.25pm the next day, forceps delivery). It seemed like a waste of time.
    "Beautiful young people are accidents of nature, But beautiful old people are works of art."
    -- Eleanor Roosevelt
  • notanewuser
    notanewuser Posts: 8,499 Forumite
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    Didn't do the NHS classes - I didn't want to see the equipment (which eventually ended up being used and I still don't ever want to see it).

    Did NCT. Made the best friends of my life at that class (we still see each other at least once a week and our now 3/almost 3 year olds are best friends), and while the technical knowledge given went in one ear and out the other for me, it really helped DH with what was going on during my very very long labour. Ours wasn't too preachy. We were confident enough to do what we felt was right anyway.
    Trying to be a man is a waste of a woman
  • notanewuser
    notanewuser Posts: 8,499 Forumite
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    Do you have a daisy birthing practitioner in your area? Have heard good things about their classes.

    http://www.thelazydaisychain.co.uk/find-a-class
    Trying to be a man is a waste of a woman
  • notanewuser
    notanewuser Posts: 8,499 Forumite
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    barbiedoll wrote: »
    I work with post-natal women and their families and many of them have attended NCT classes. To be honest, it depends on who is holding the class, some of the teachers can be very unhelpful and have some quite odd ideas about what actually happens during a birth. One woman told me that her teacher was always telling the women "Whatever you do, don't let them cut you", as though midwives and doctors just perform episotomies for the fun of it. :mad:

    They say that because the NHS can be a bit "cut-happy" and tissues actually heal better from tearing than cutting. Obviously sometimes it's absolutely necessary, but not always.


    barbiedoll wrote: »
    On the other hand, they can provide excellent support with breastfeeding and women always say that they have made friends with other local mums-to-be, so if nothing else, they can be a good way to meet other parents if you don't have friends with children or much in the way of family support after the birth.

    Many hospitals do run free ante-natal classes, usually they go through birth options, what happens if you have to have an emergency section and so on, and also breastfeeding classes.

    I'm sure it's not what you meant, but nobody has to do anything.
    Trying to be a man is a waste of a woman
  • flower24
    flower24 Posts: 1,719 Forumite
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    Eek that's a lot! I thought they were all free!

    My children are 5 & 6 and I never bothered with the classes, I felt a little self-conscious about my age first time round as I was 19, and preferred to read pregnancy books and magazines from cover to cover :-) I think that did me fine
  • peachyprice
    peachyprice Posts: 22,346 Forumite
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    I'm sure it's not what you meant, but nobody has to do anything.

    No, I suppose they could let their babies die.
    Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence and face your future without fear
  • jackyann
    jackyann Posts: 3,433 Forumite
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    NHS classes vary from area to area as each commissioning group decides what they want to "buy". I know areas with excellent NHS classes and areas with none.

    I have worked with mums & babies all of my life and have children of my own. I suggest that you ask your midwife and at the local children's centre and see what the NHS classes are like.
    You know your own social situation and your own personality, and how much support you already have from friends & family.
    You also know how you feel about giving birth: for some women it is an intense experience that they wish to prepare for carefully; for others it is just something to be got through, and they have no strong feelings about a "natural" birth.

    If there are good NHS classes and good local support groups and / or you have supportive friends & family, then I would only pay for NCT classes if you feel strongly about careful birth preparation.
    If you feel rather more isolated, then consider attending the NCT.

    Most areas have NCT groups that run some sort of "bump & babe" get togethers, that you can attend without joining or committing, to get a "feel". NCT teachers will also talk you through what they provide so you can make a decision.

    Good luck
  • notanewuser
    notanewuser Posts: 8,499 Forumite
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    No, I suppose they could let their babies die.

    If they didn't want the c-section, yes they could. Most wouldn't, of course, but actually the choice is the labouring mother's, not the midwives/consultants/doula/whoever happens to be around. They should be giving accurate advice, not forcing hands.

    My midwife told me that unless I was induced (at 12 days "overdue") my baby would die. This while I was actually in slow labour. At the time I was horrified, frightened and pushed into induction and a very medicalised hospital birth that was a million times removed from the calm home water birth I wanted. To make it worse most of their equipment was faulty meaning that DD appeared to be "in distress" when actually there was nothing wrong at all.

    A due date is a guess anyway. The midwife lied to my face about me being in labour, and instead used horrible shock tactics to get me into hospital where she wanted me. In reality, had she left me alone I probably would have had DD naturally within the week. I have PTSD, plus physical issues that are still unresolved almost 3 years later as a result of her poor practice. I'm fully supportive of those working in maternity services, but ultimately it should never be anything but a woman's choice.
    Trying to be a man is a waste of a woman
  • Person_one
    Person_one Posts: 28,884 Forumite
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    No, I suppose they could let their babies die.

    ...or themselves.
  • peachyprice
    peachyprice Posts: 22,346 Forumite
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    Person_one wrote: »
    ...or themselves.

    Or both even.
    Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence and face your future without fear
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