Thoughts on walk in bath

2

Comments

  • chesky369
    chesky369 Posts: 2,590 Forumite
    What's to get the hang of? Have you never had one e.g. at a swimming-pool?

    A huge number of accidents in the home are caused by people getting in and out of baths.

    I don't know how a walk-in bath would work. Do you get in then put in the water? Do you stand up rather than lying down as you would in a normal bath? I don't get it.

    I never suggested a walk-in bath. I think waiting for them to fill up and empty would actually discourage one from taking a daily bath - it would take much too long. I suggested a bath hoist which can be used in one's normal bath.
  • hardpressed
    hardpressed Posts: 2,099 Forumite
    First Post First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    Shower cubicle it is then.
  • margaretclare
    margaretclare Posts: 10,789 Forumite
    edited 23 May 2012 at 9:53AM
    Shower cubicle it is then.

    Get a nice modern one. We had one that's slightly bigger - if required we could put a seat in it. Ours has a curved door - no sharp corners to cause damage. Remember grab-rails inside and outside the cubicle. We had our bathroom completely tiled for ease of cleaning.

    The description by blossomhill sounds absolutely horrendous. I shouldn't like that at all. With a shower, there is no 'scum'. Shower gel all just washes off. I know of people who do a 'submariner's shower'. Turn the water on, get wet all over, use shower-gel, then turn the water back on and shower it all off. We don't do that, we like standing under the water, but if water shortages continue then baths may become less popular. Our water use is reflected in our water bills - we don't use anything like as much, even with 2 of us showering every morning.
    [FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Æ[/FONT]r ic wisdom funde, [FONT=Times New Roman, serif]æ[/FONT]r wear[FONT=Times New Roman, serif]ð[/FONT] ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
  • tich2
    tich2 Posts: 186 Forumite
    edited 23 May 2012 at 1:23PM
    I work for the Occupational Therapy team for social services and 90% of the people I assess have difficulty with bathing.
    My advice is not to have a walk in bath installed. I have had so many people come back to us after they have had them installed and they all hate them.
    The big two points to consider are that you have to be very careful about the seal around the door and watch for leaking but the biggest issue is getting cold. You need to get in the bath, fill it up and then when finished you have to wait for all the water to drain out before you can get out. It may not seem long but all the clients I have spoken to get very cold very quick after being in a hot bath.
    Please contact social services first and they may be able to supply a bath lift free of charge where they also provide servicing yearly of the bath lift.
    There are many kinds of bath lift. If you prefer one that you can soak in and lean back in the Mangar Handy Bather is for you but you need good trunk strength.
    If you struggle to sit up and have poor trunk strength then go for a Neptune bath lift, these are great bits of kit but it does mean you sit upright in the bath.
    With these you don't just climb into the bath and then sit on them. The way to use them is to raise them to the top of the bath, sit across the seat, swing the legs over the bath and then lower down. Getting out is the reverse. Let me know if you need any more info.
    Here are a couple of links to the bath lifts.

    bathing cusion

    Neptune
  • Be_Happy
    Be_Happy Posts: 1,391 Forumite
    First Post Combo Breaker First Anniversary
    Be very careful when choosing a bath hoist. My mother had one (installed before we knew she was getting it) and it was a monster.

    It was a motorised metal/plastic seat that was switched on and then moved itself up or down in the bath. While it was easy to use, it was very bulky and extremely difficult to clean. There were so many nooks and crannies in the framework. The rubber strip ones and cushions I've seen advertised look a bit more streamlined.

    A reply to any of the advertisements seems to result in a home visit by a very pushy salesman. I'm sure she was vastly overcharged at the time. She had bought from an advert in a magazine which was always championing the rights of the elderly and thought this meant approval of the advert.
  • tich2
    tich2 Posts: 186 Forumite
    Be_Happy wrote: »
    Be very careful when choosing a bath hoist. My mother had one (installed before we knew she was getting it) and it was a monster.

    It was a motorised metal/plastic seat that was switched on and then moved itself up or down in the bath. While it was easy to use, it was very bulky and extremely difficult to clean. There were so many nooks and crannies in the framework. The rubber strip ones and cushions I've seen advertised look a bit more streamlined.

    A reply to any of the advertisements seems to result in a home visit by a very pushy salesman. I'm sure she was vastly overcharged at the time. She had bought from an advert in a magazine which was always championing the rights of the elderly and thought this meant approval of the advert.

    Please do pay attention to Behappys post with reference to being ripped off. We can get these bath lifts as social services for about £350 and I have seen some company's charging in excess of £1500. Not a bad mark up for them. They know they are dealing with vulnerable people and it is a disgrace:mad:.

    With regards to cleaning the two I have recommended are very easy. Also one thing I forgot to mention with the Mangar Handy Bather is that this is very portable and I have a lot of clients that take them away to family members homes when they go and visit as they are quite light and the battery compressor is small. Neither of these bath lifts have electricity in the bathroom which is a big worry for the elderly. They are both run on batteries that recharge just like a cordless phone.

    If you need any further advice on this matter please PM me and I will give you my number and will have a chat with you about the pro's and cons of bath lifts, bath boards, level access showers, shower cubicles etc.

    I hope this helps

    Tich:)
  • macaque_2
    macaque_2 Posts: 2,439 Forumite
    Has anyone any experience of these? Bit of background, at the moment I have a shower over the bath, I prefer having a bath but with a bad back sometimes find it difficult to get into the bath. Had though of having a shower cubicle put in the bathroom but it means moving the toilet and would make the bathroom a bit crowded. So I thought if I had a walk in bath it would mean just changing the bath, would probably only use the walk in bit when I have a shower but would have the option of the walk in bath as I get older. Am I mad to even consider it?

    Give it a try by all means but be aware of the limitations. Walk in baths are generally only really suitable for people with strong arms and a very fast wrist action.
  • kidmugsy
    kidmugsy Posts: 12,709 Forumite
    First Anniversary Name Dropper First Post Combo Breaker
    "Turn the water on, get wet all over, use shower-gel, then turn the water back on and shower it all off."

    Or: get wet, turn off, apply shampoo, let it sit while using back-brush on back, feet, ankles, shins, calves and knees. Shower it off, then turn off. Apply conditioner; apply gel to arms, oxters, trunk and points south. Rub, selectively, with abrasive thing whose name I don't know. Shower off.

    This is pretty economical of water which is just as well as we have a Power Shower (but it really is the thing to have!).
    Free the dunston one next time too.
  • I agree with previous posters; I used to help someone who had a walk-in bath - she had to sit cold while it filled up (trying to get a suitable water temp as it did ) then wait for it to empty and we had to cover her in towels as she was so cold - it was also quite scummy waiting for the water to drain down past her body, seemed more scummy than just standing up out of the water

    Bath lifts seem much better or there is a compromise where the door traps a certain amount of water, in like a footbath, while the person showers their body behind the screen in a seated position - draisn quicker and the shower water keeps the person warm to the end

    As someone who worked in Occupational Therapy this is spot on.
  • agrinnall
    agrinnall Posts: 23,344 Forumite
    First Post Combo Breaker
    kidmugsy wrote: »
    "Turn the water on, get wet all over, use shower-gel, then turn the water back on and shower it all off."

    Or: get wet, turn off, apply shampoo, let it sit while using back-brush on back, feet, ankles, shins, calves and knees. Shower it off, then turn off. Apply conditioner; apply gel to arms, oxters, trunk and points south. Rub, selectively, with abrasive thing whose name I don't know. Shower off.

    This is pretty economical of water which is just as well as we have a Power Shower (but it really is the thing to have!).


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