Please ensure your electrics are up to date!!!!!!!!!

1568101136

Replies

  • asp746asp746 Forumite
    385 Posts
    i just got my gas & water earthed and it was £180 all in and he also earthed a metal plate lightswitch. all done by a part p niceic electrician in the northwest.

    he's just in the middle of rewiring all my sockets and plastering them in and that's £650. I've got a few quid spare so he's rewiring the shower for £140 (which is the only thing i thought ouch that's dear) and the floodlight in the garden is only going to be £40 - not sure how he works his pricing out.

    he's quoted me £150 for a split fuseboard incl installation so after xmas that'll be getting doe too. can't believe my luck i've found a nice sparky

    i can't afford to get everything done at once so i'm having it done in piece meal and he's happy to do it that way infact i think he probably makes more that way but i don't care so long as its done.
  • I'm a bit of a technical no-hoper really but i'm wondering if you can help?

    We live in a rented house which had the NICEIC inspection done 1 year ago, before we moved in.

    Each time a lightbulb goes, there's a big bang and the lights go out.
    We change the lightbulb and flick the fuse-switch-thingy (technical term!)back and all seems good. (this has happened about 6 times this year)

    But... the first time this happened was in the kitchen and it blew up the fridge freezer. This was the LL's and part of the agreement is that she will not maintain. So we bought a new one (old one was about 5-6 years old anyway). This seems fine but didn't buy the extended warranty, still not sure whether too.

    but when the light on the extractor fan in kitchen blew last week, the lightbulb shattered everywhere and it took ages the get the bit with the thread out. Anyway, replaced the bulb and the light and fan still didn't work.
    Replaced the fuse on the plug, still didn't work.
    so i think the bulb blowing has kn*ck*r*d the whole thing.
    Is this normal???

    I'm already having to get something else in the house sorted so don't really want to report it (but think i'll have to)

    and then the one of the living room lights went yesterday morning at 5.30 and took all the lights out in the house, but left the iron and kettle on???

    can anyone give me some advice as to whether
    1. This is normal?
    2. Should i report it?
    3. Is there anything i can do to stop it?

    Thanks for any advice for a technical no-hoper!
    Needs must when the devil vomits in your kettle..........
  • asp746asp746 Forumite
    385 Posts
    if you're renting isn't it your landlords responsibility? I think to be honest you're duty bound to notify him/her.

    don't put it off and good luck!
  • baldelectricianbaldelectrician Forumite
    2.5K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    I am speculating here, but I suspect you buy supermarket own brand lamps and these can be poor quality and cause things to trip

    buy branded lamps (philips, osram, sylvania)
    baldly going on...
  • diamond_davediamond_dave Forumite
    746 Posts
    Part of the Furniture 500 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭
    hi All, I have got to pass on this gem about qualified electricians and the new regs: friends move into a new bungalow and decide the have a extension built, new kitchen, new shower and on-suite, etc. I get an urgent call from them some months later to ask if I could fit an extractor fan in the existing bathroom. I tell them about the regs but agree to take a look.Turns out that when they first use the showers everything trips. It turns out that this guy has wired BOTH 9kw showers on 1 circuit!! Next he tells them that they need new mcb so installs much larger one(their cost) and he-ho 1 shower works but 2 blow the circuits! Finally, they discover, following a council inspection, that the plugs weren't wired correctly + no grommets, the new cooker had not been fitted correctly, was dangerous and had to be refitted and rewired, and that somewhere behind a stud wall was a live uninsulated cable.The council failed the wiring on dozens of points and when I looked in the roof re. the fan it looked like Spagetti Junction!! Bearing in mind they had had 3 guys to do these jobs and were desperate. I did install the fan for them and simplified some of the wiring because they were desperate having spent thousands of pounds. The point that I am making is that this job was passed by a qualified electrician - so you people out there please dont lecture us about safety, certification etc when youve got so called qualified people messing up peoples lives. I expect to get some flak now!
  • drezsadrezsa Forumite
    127 Posts
    Few people are prepared to pay for proper electricians hence there aren't too many about.
  • An RCD saved my life back when I didn't know how to wire a plug, they don't teach things like that in school. I wired neutral into live, plugged in & switched on, next thing I knew I was on my back across the other side of the room in pitch darkness. The plug was on fire & my hand was black, but thanks to an RCD I was still alive.
    Winnings :D
    01/12/07 Baileys Cocktail Shaker

    My other signature is in English.
  • barrymungbarrymung Forumite
    638 Posts
    ftbworried wrote: »
    Electrical safety law dictates that all modern electrical work be inspected by a registered electrician. If you don't get a certificate for the inspection, you'll be breaking the law, as well as living in a potentially unsafe home.

    Does anyone have a link to this?

    As far as I know there is no legal obligation whatsoever for a home owner to posess an inspection certificate!

    (Things are different for NEW work carried out in kitchens and bathrooms, ie "Part P")
  • gromitukgromituk Forumite
    3.1K Posts
    You're right - it's just scaremongering, although Part P covers more than just work in kitchens and bathrooms.
    Time is an illusion - lunch time doubly so.
  • brightontravellerbrightontraveller Forumite
    1.4K Posts
    ✭✭✭
    Following is a list of Part P Schemes all theses can issue certification for electrical works


    Part P Schemes (Electrical Safety in Dwellings)

    (a) Full competence schemes
    BRE Certification Limited
    This scheme, operated with the support of the Electrical Contractors Association and the Institution of Electrical Engineers, is primarily designed for those whose main business is electrical contracting and those who wish to be able to self-certify all types of electrical work in dwellings. The scheme will begin formal operation on 1 January 2005.

    For more information on this scheme see www.partp.co.uk

    British Standards Institution
    This scheme, which will be known as the Kitemark Scheme for electrical installation work, is primarily designed for those whose main business is electrical contracting and those who wish to be able to self-certify all types of electrical work in dwellings. The scheme will begin formal operation on 1 January 2005.

    For more information on this scheme see www.kitemarktoday.com

    ELECSA Limited
    This scheme, operated with the support of the British Board of Agrement, is primarily designed for those whose main business is electrical contracting and those who wish to be able to self-certify all types of electrical work in dwellings. The scheme will begin formal operation on 1 January 2005.

    For more information on this scheme see www.elecsa.org.uk

    NAPIT Certification Limited
    This scheme is designed primarily for those whose main business is electrical contracting and will allow its members to self-certify all types of electrical installation work in dwellings. The scheme will begin formal operation on 1 January 2005.

    For more information on this scheme see www.napit.org.uk

    NICEIC Certification Services Limited
    This scheme, which is known as the Domestic Installer Scheme, is designed for those who wish to be able to self-certify all types of electrical work in dwellings either as an electrical contractor or as part of an ancillary trade activity. The scheme will begin formal operation on 1 January 2005.

    For more information on this scheme see www.niceic.org.uk

    (b) Defined competence schemes
    These schemes are designed primarily for those who do electrical installation work as an adjunct to or in connection with their primary work activities - for example, gas installations, plumbing, kitchen or bathroom fitting, heating installation, security systems..

    CORGI Services Limited

    This scheme is designed initially to allow CORGI registered gas installers to be able to self-certify the electrical installation work they do in relation to the installation of gas appliances but will be open to others in other areas of work activity in the future. The scheme will begin formal operation on 1 January 2005.

    For more information on this scheme see www.corgi-gas-safety.com

    ELECSA Limited

    This scheme is designed to allow members to self-certify the electrical installation work they carry out only within the context of their primary work activity. There is no restriction as to the type of primary work activity. The scheme will begin formal operation on 1 January 2005.

    For more information on this scheme see www.elecsa.org.uk

    NAPIT Certification Limited

    This scheme is designed to allow members to self-certify the electrical installation work they carry out only within the context of their primary work activity. There is no restriction as to the type of primary work activity.The scheme will begin formal operation on 1 January 2005

    For more information on the scheme see [EMAIL="info@napit.org.uk"][email protected][/EMAIL]

    NICEIC Certification Services Limited

    This scheme is designed to allow members to self-certify the electrical installation work they carry out only in connection with their primary work activity. There is no restriction as to the type of primary work activity. The scheme will begin formal operation on 1 January 2005.

    For more information see www.niceic.org.uk

    OFTEC (Oil Firing Technical Association for the Petroleum Industry Ltd)

    This scheme is designed only for members of the OFTEC installation of oil-fired combustion appliance (including the installation of oil storage tanks and pipe) competent person scheme (see above) to be able to self-certify the electrical installation work they do only in this context. The scheme will begin formal operation on 1 January 2005.

    For more information see www.oftec.org.uk
This discussion has been closed.
Latest MSE News and Guides

Bacon flavoured toothpaste

Can you help this Forumite track some down?

Join the Forum discussion

£10 Christmas bonus

For benefits recipients

MSE News