Please ensure your electrics are up to date!!!!!!!!!

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Replies

  • sparkysi wrote: »
    Fitting an RCD does not make the system safe by default. I would recommend a full test and inspect of the electrical system which should highlight any hidden faults and determine if the existing protective devices are up to the job.

    Note that it is entirely possible to have a fault which would trip an RCD/RCBO without it actually presenting as an issue at the moment.

    It is very important ot have the installation inspected before simply adding in further protective devices, something a decent sparks will do if altering the protective measures of a circuit anyway as they have to be tested to ensure compliance as a minimum.

    This is precisely what they are trying to avoid.

    We have all taken our car for an MOT only for the mechanic to see it as an opportunity to print money and I very much think it can be the same teeth sucking response, when an electrician is presented with an electrical circuit built to 1930s design and rewired to 1970s standards. (ie it is 1970s wiring (plus some later additions on their own circuit.) inserted into 1930s conduit or simply plastered into the wall. In the 1930s here and in the 2010s in many parts of the world, the clever idea of the ring main has still to be invented.

    Ripping up all the floorboards and chasing all the walls, is not realistically an option financially or organisationally at the moment.

    As I see it there are two risks with wiring of unknown quality, plus the third risk that the electrics will be used by persons of no understanding.

    As the old saying goes, it is not usually the nut holding the road wheels that causes the accident, it is the nut holding the steering wheel.

    As far as the risks from the circuit go I see the two accidents as localised over heating by arcing and escape of electricity.
    A residual circuit device should find the latter and row of MCB's should frustrate any nutty ideas of plugging the iron into the light socket?

    ie one of these 42783.jpg

    plus a row of these would be a major improvement in safety for minimal cost and disruption?
    38609.jpg
  • EdwardiaEdwardia Forumite
    9.2K Posts
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    We noticed a water leak in the front garden and once investigated discovered that the water main was (a) gushing water and (b) made of lead.

    OH and a DIY mad neighbour decided to tackle the job of replacing the water main themselves. While removing the floorboards, OH discovered a bare wire attached to the lead pipe and managed to follow it back to the spaghetti junction like fuse box.

    He called the water company and they cheerfully told him that the water main in our street had been replaced with plastic - which meant we had no Earth whatsoever.

    We called in NICEIC contractors to do a rush rewire job and when the electricians were crawling around in the loft and making holes in beautiful old floorboards in between mugs of tea, they told me there was more than five times too much current in one of the socket circuit and the junction boxes in the loft were so overloaded there could have been a fire.

    We learned a lesson. It's all very well redecorating and spending dosh on laptops, 48" TV etc, the basics need doing first - electricity, plumbing, roof.
  • edited 27 May 2013 at 9:08PM
    I_have_spokenI_have_spoken
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    edited 27 May 2013 at 9:08PM
    they told me there was more than five times too much current in one of the socket circuit

    Did they explain why the fuse hadn't blown then? You've had the cowboys in...:think:
  • RockingitRockingit Forumite
    206 Posts
    Edwardia wrote: »
    While removing the floorboards, OH discovered a bare wire attached to the lead pipe and managed to follow it back to the spaghetti junction like fuse box.

    He called the water company and they cheerfully told him that the water main in our street had been replaced with plastic - which meant we had no Earth whatsoever.

    They told me there was more than five times too much current in one of the socket circuit and the junction boxes in the loft were so overloaded there could have been a fire.
    Did they explain why the fuse hadn't blown then?

    It would be unfair to be too critical without knowing the full facts, but it sounds like somebody made a (un)fair penny off that job! Would love to see the EICR / PIR from before they started work!
  • Did they explain why the fuse hadn't blown then? You've had the cowboys in...:think:

    Cooker fuse wire used for the lighting circuit?

    My home must be a death trap because is has one of these as an earth:eek:

    87633_P


    http://www.screwfix.com/p/earth-rod-5-8-4ft-extendable/87633#
  • RockingitRockingit Forumite
    206 Posts
    Cooker fuse wire used for the lighting circuit?

    My home must be a death trap because is has one of these as an earth:eek:

    Not sure if that was meant tongue in cheek or not - as there is absolutely diddly squat wrong with an installation which is earthed via an earth rod ("TT" earthing) so long, as always, it has been installed and maintained correctly to start with. In fact, in can be argued that TT systems can be safer under certain circumstances.

    However, 30A fuse wire in a 5A lighting circuit isn't the best of ideas!
  • edited 7 June 2013 at 2:32PM
    Mary_HartnellMary_Hartnell Forumite
    874 Posts
    edited 7 June 2013 at 2:32PM
    So what is the difference between this version of the regulations and my 1980's version other than £52.

    23064_P15747_P

    It is not a trivial question I have [STRIKE]26[/STRIKE] 29 similar sockets in my modest home.

    Woops I was forgetting the garage & shed.
  • penrhynpenrhyn Forumite
    15.2K Posts
    Part of the Furniture Combo Breaker
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    Wot all your sokets got earth leakage trips.?
    That gum you like is coming back in style.
  • RockingitRockingit Forumite
    206 Posts
    So what is the difference between this version of the regulations and my 1980's version other than £52.

    23064_P15747_P

    It is not a trivial question I have [STRIKE]26[/STRIKE] 29 similar sockets in my modest home.

    Woops I was forgetting the garage & shed.

    Mary - are you being serious when you say that they have installed 29 x RCD (extra buttons on) socket outlets? Or have I misunderstood?
  • edited 10 June 2013 at 3:19PM
    Mary_HartnellMary_Hartnell Forumite
    874 Posts
    edited 10 June 2013 at 3:19PM
    Thanks for your concern, nothing has actually been done yet.

    Outside the back door of my 1950s built home, there is a a garage to the left and an area of "larder" sized cupboard/rooms intended for storage, to the right. Originally the were intended for storing food stuff, logs, coal and gardening stuff. As their walls are not structural, my idea is to make more room in the kitchen by relegating the washer dryer welly boots and all that other stuff that clutters up the kitchen, into this area of my new utility room.
    If the washer dryer and sink were placed along the wall backing onto the kitchen they would be only a few feet from their present position. To my way of thinking the existing ring main could simply incorporate 2 or 3 extra sockets in the new utility area. Sort of back to back with existing sockets in the kitchen.

    However, there has been some tooth sucking suggesting that I would need a new circuit from its own mini consumer unit plus use of RCD sockets because the house uses its own earth rod; and new work should be done to the 17th (?) edition of the regulations. [Perhaps it is time to have the whole house brought up to the latest standards.]

    Having an ultra safe utility room and and 1970/80 "dangerous" kitchen, seems a bit "Alice in Wonderland".
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