Tesco wouldn't take any coupons

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Praise, Vent & Warnings
57 replies 4.9K views
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  • ben500ben500
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    rdwarr wrote:
    Does anybody know if Tesco actually submit the coupons to the issuers for reimbursement? If they do then hammy's allegations of fraud would seem true, otherwise, if they're absorbing the cost themselves, it's up to them if they choose to take the hit.

    Tesco do indeed redeem all coupons they receive that are valid, considering the amount they accept they naturally have a high percentage of wastage in the form of invalid coupons for products not sold (till operators can themselves override a rejected coupon by using a generic coupon code) coupons mutilated to appear valid when invalid (dates chopped off, competitors name chopped off although most these days now have store name in redemption instructions) photocopied coupons and occasionally forged coupons, they absorb the costs on competitors coupons such as Sainsbury because it is cost effective to have a customer come to your store and receive 10% off rather than go to the competitor it's just a simple price match if you like, most of the larger manufacturers are aware of what Tesco do and accept it for one reason or another, in the case of the smaller manufacturer or distributor it's a case of put up with it or have your stock pulled from the shelf, but there are without doubt those out there that are unaware that the coupons are not being redeemed as agreed and whether or not they would pursue prosecution is again another matter, Tesco do it because they can, others put up with it because they have to.
    Four guns yet only one trigger prepare for a volley.


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  • bobsa1bobsa1 Forumite
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    I tried to use coupons for the first time yesterday & had £5.00 against a spend of £35 refused. Not sure whether to try another tesco or waitrose or give up. Any ideas?
  • ben500 wrote:
    All the major supermarkets accept coupons on differing basis, Tesco, Asda, Morrisons will all accept coupons for items you have not purchased, the application varies across the country and even store to store locally, Morrisons are the most sporadic, Tesco have been the most consistent in that they for the most part will take ANY coupon that will scan, this goes up and down depending on store targets productivity etc, Asda seem to be aiming at Three of each coupon in most of its stores but again in some stores they will just keep taking them as long as you hand them over.

    You are committing no offence or deception when using coupons, the store places an item on its shelves with a price guideline which represents an "offer to treat" this is the value they feel they need in return for the product, they can accept or refuse any offer you make in exchange for these goods, be it a coupon a coin a banknote or a giraffe's ear for that matter, if they accept your payment whatever that payment is then a bargain has been struck, despite the wording on the coupon which may in some cases even state "it is fraudulent to offer this coupon in payment for any product other than stated" this is a load of old pants by the way from the customers point of view, the only time a deception or fraudulent act takes place is if the store later go on to present that coupon to the issuer as having been accepted for the product when it actually hasn't.

    NCH stands for National Clearing House and is based in Northants and handles coupon redemption for all the big players and many smaller independants, there are a few other clearing centres but NCH are by far the biggest, some stores actually have their own clearing houses but these generally gather coupons from the regions redeem through NCH and ensure the correct funds/credit is allocated to the correct region/store.

    HTH

    your 'legal' argument doesn't hold much water ....you are knowingly 'paying' with a coupon that you know to be invalid. taking your argument to the extreme is it ok to offer a £20 note you know to be forged ?
    also people on this thread are complaining that the staff are looking and checking for proof that the item has been bought.
    now i've only been shopping for blah blah years in supermarkets but i think i know if i've bought a 500 gramme block of Anchor canadian mature cheddar that i'm presenting the coupon for....don't you ?
  • --Tony----Tony-- Forumite
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    your 'legal' argument doesn't hold much water ....you are knowingly 'paying' with a coupon that you know to be invalid. taking your argument to the extreme is it ok to offer a £20 note you know to be forged ?
    also people on this thread are complaining that the staff are looking and checking for proof that the item has been bought.
    now i've only been shopping for blah blah years in supermarkets but i think i know if I've bought a 500 gramme block of Anchor canadian mature cheddar that i'm presenting the coupon for....don't you ?

    It's not in the slightest the same, Ben500 is Correct. Your argument about the forged £20 is wrong, if I offer a forged £20 note and Tesco know its forged (thats the important bit) and are willing to accept it as payment for their goods its deal done. The legality of owning and using forged "coin of the realm" is a different matter and different law, which just confuses the matter.

    If I went in with monopoly Money and they "yes sir we accept Monopoly money, the more the better", thats their choice!

    you can pay with whatever Tesco are wiling to accept. If I went in with a cow and Tesco were willing to accept it as a "Barter" then its a deal.

    As to your
    .
  • ben500ben500
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    your 'legal' argument doesn't hold much water ....you are knowingly 'paying' with a coupon that you know to be invalid. taking your argument to the extreme is it ok to offer a £20 note you know to be forged ?
    also people on this thread are complaining that the staff are looking and checking for proof that the item has been bought.
    now i've only been shopping for blah blah years in supermarkets but i think i know if i've bought a 500 gramme block of Anchor canadian mature cheddar that i'm presenting the coupon for....don't you ?

    I don't think there is any question that the buyer knows full well they haven't purchased the product, you are missing the point on that one.

    As for my arguement not holding water I think you will find your lack of knowledge in this field is letting you down. Your example of a forged £20 note being presented is not an adequate comparison as Tony explains there are a whole heap of offences involved in passing a forged "coin of the realm" which are totally unrelated to contract law. You obviously missed the point of my inclusion of a giraffes ear as payment, the item on the shelf is indeed worth ANYTHING Tesco will accept for it the price is merely "an invitation to treat" A statement by the vendor inviting such a payment in exchange for goods as a guideline, if you choose to make a different offer that is your prorogative as it is the vendors to refuse or accept that offer be it cash, crude oil, goats or maybe even a dustbin lid!


    That'll be £2.20 sir, I'm sorry I haven't got anything smaller than a dustbin lid do you have change?
    Four guns yet only one trigger prepare for a volley.


    Together we can make a difference.
  • FelicityFelicity Forumite
    1.1K Posts
    Oh for goodness sake.

    Are you aware of the profits that Tesco make each year? Are you aware of how many Tesco stores are built / planned every year that put our local and regional stores out of business?

    BTW We support our local shop and buy all our meat, poultry and fish from them. Everything else comes from Tesco.

    If you can get 10%, 20%, 50% or even 100% off at Tesco .... GO FOR IT!

    For those of you arguing about the principles of it, for goodness sake, think about it! Tesco make millions of pounds every year, if MSE's are saving a few quid, WOW, big dent in profits.

    For those of you arguing for the manufacturers, again, think about it. Companies like 'P&G' make absolutely millions worldwide. Are you hurting them or denting their profits? I doubt it very much.
  • derekacorahderekacorah Forumite
    408 Posts
    keren29 wrote:
    Wikipedia definition of a chav:

    "Chav is a derogatory slang term in popular usage throughout the UK. It refers to a subculture stereotype of a person who is uneducated, uncultured and prone to antisocial or immoral behaviour. The label is typically, though not exclusively, applied to teenagers and young adults of white working-class or lower-middle class origin. Chav is used for both sexes, where a male chav is sometimes referred to as a chavster and a female as a chavette"

    I am studying for a Masters Degree in Media and Cultural Studies and have no criminal record, including no points on my licence. I am not a teenager, or young adult (I wish) and yes, whilst white, I would class my job as middle management professional, so I'm not 100% sure if that is 'of lower middle class origin'.



    I am a money saver who was operating within a Tescowide policy, a policy which has been in place for many many years.
    i find your comments offensive,i went to school but not uni,does that make me uneducated? grow up,im also white and working class but in no way a chav. grow up.
    :happylove
  • my first major point was that accepting coupons and then seeking repayment from the manufacturer would constitute fraud. however the bumph about "the treaty to tender" is also a red-herring ...the coupon isn't being offered against 'an' item , they knowingly pass it across even though they know it is invalid and it is being offered by the customer against the full value of their shopping ...a different matter.
    not withstanding the fact that 95% of people offer the coupons after the shopping has been scanned , bagged and a 'total' figure displayed on the till.
    if your point were indeed true this thread becomes a nonsense as tesco's could refuse to accept any coupons whenever they liked ,for whatever reason on a local basis and on an hour by hour basis .....which is where we came in at post number 1
  • ben500ben500
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    my first major point was that accepting coupons and then seeking repayment from the manufacturer would constitute fraud. however the bumph about "the treaty to tender" is also a red-herring ...the coupon isn't being offered against 'an' item , they knowingly pass it across even though they know it is invalid and it is being offered by the customer against the full value of their shopping ...a different matter.
    not withstanding the fact that 95% of people offer the coupons after the shopping has been scanned , bagged and a 'total' figure displayed on the till.
    if your point were indeed true this thread becomes a nonsense as tesco's could refuse to accept any coupons whenever they liked ,for whatever reason on a local basis and on an hour by hour basis .....which is where we came in at post number 1

    This post makes no sense whatsover!
    Four guns yet only one trigger prepare for a volley.


    Together we can make a difference.
  • IvanOpinionIvanOpinion Forumite
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    I have always been of the impression that if a store takes vouchers then good for it, go ahead and use them, if however they impose limitations then you have to accept those limitations .. what is the big deal. Tescos do seem to be delegating more responsibility to the store managers therefore different stores may have different policies .. the ultimate bottom line is that no store HAS to sell you anything.

    ivan
    Don't waste time on other peoples first world problems
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