Oh no its another what would you do thread

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Marriage, Relationships & Families
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  • peliroccopelirocco Forumite
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    As parents we have to protect our children and at 5 years old if my child told me that incident had happened I would have been straight down to the school asking questions. Teachers have been trained in child protection issues, as have school nurses........what I was most vexed about was a school secretary checking the OPs daughters head for nits/lice.......Teachers train for years on how to educate our children, they are vetted before they take up any post, Nurses train for years and are also vetted before taking a post.......The school secretary is probably vetted but has she had child protection training? Does she attend teacher training days? No probably not, so why therefore is she touching a pupils head?

    There have been many tragedys/abuse cases all over the country, and it happens by people kids know and trust Ie Ian Huntley....some members of the clergy, even nursery nurses (not for one min am i suggesting that anything happened other than what the OP has told us!)

    My thoughts are if an adult in a trusted position is able to make a 5 year old child feel miffed and clearly uncomfortable...well enough to tell mum....without doing anything naughty then questions need to be asked!

    As I said before.....when it comes to our children they only have us to back them up, and at 5 being made to feel miffed can lead on to other problems ie self confidence ect...... As a parent of a child who has had major confidence issues due to some insensitive things being said to her/or done with her I can assure you its no joke!!


    Your children must live in fear of everyone........... that will help confidence :rolleyes:
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  • elainewelainew Forumite
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    Maybe your child was itching like mad and in the interest of the child being uncomfortable she checked and then maybe could have phoned you.
    I would be thanking them instead of moaning
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  • The school secretary is probably vetted but has she had child protection training? Does she attend teacher training days? No probably not, so why therefore is she touching a pupils head?

    Guess what. I work in a school office -

    Yes they are vetted (enhanced CRB, exactly the same as teachers)
    Yes they do (should) have child protection training
    and Yes they do attend 'relevant' teacher training days, ie. yes to child protection, autism awareness, etc. No to teaching methods.

    Staff ARE allowed to touch children in most schools (only those scared by extremist parents have banned it), I wouldn't want my child in any school where they weren't. Primary age children especially need contact with those around them to help them grow to be healthy nurturing adults themselves.

    As for the issue this thread started with. I can't make any judgment that wouldn't be based on a lot of assumptions/guesswork. By all means go in this afternoon or tomorrow morning and have a chat with the staff. Chances are they'll be more than happy to discuss any issues with you, and hopefully clear everything up.

    As a final point. No, school secretaries are not nurses. Very few schools have a nurse all to themselves now, and I doubt our local team would appreciate a call out to see one child with an itchy head. Many secretaries are first aid trained however,and those who aren't will still likely have seen many nits, bandaged many knees and taken many temperatures, and are often mums themselves. All school staff want the best for children, you wouldn't get by working there long otherwise
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  • Jojo_the_TightfistedJojo_the_Tightfisted Forumite
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    My old school nurse became a school secretary. Lots of them weren't needed after the 1980s, so they had to do something, and they were used to interacting with children. Sounds perfect to me.

    Within a year or so of starting school, every child knows that scratching means nits. So any child scratching is avoided on the grounds that they could have them.

    Of course, the alternative to a discreet check is the kid in the playground who has little brothers and sisters diagnosing infestations. I'd rather the secretary had a quick peek and I'll bet anyone else scratching would have been sent up to the office as well.
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  • hobbesy wrote: »
    Guess what. I work in a school office -

    Yes they are vetted (enhanced CRB, exactly the same as teachers)
    Yes they do (should) have child protection training
    and Yes they do attend 'relevant' teacher training days, ie. yes to child protection, autism awareness, etc. No to teaching methods.

    Staff ARE allowed to touch children in most schools (only those scared by extremist parents have banned it), I wouldn't want my child in any school where they weren't. Primary age children especially need contact with those around them to help them grow to be healthy nurturing adults themselves.

    As for the issue this thread started with. I can't make any judgment that wouldn't be based on a lot of assumptions/guesswork. By all means go in this afternoon or tomorrow morning and have a chat with the staff. Chances are they'll be more than happy to discuss any issues with you, and hopefully clear everything up.

    As a final point. No, school secretaries are not nurses. Very few schools have a nurse all to themselves now, and I doubt our local team would appreciate a call out to see one child with an itchy head. Many secretaries are first aid trained however,and those who aren't will still likely have seen many nits, bandaged many knees and taken many temperatures, and are often mums themselves. All school staff want the best for children, you wouldn't get by working there long otherwise

    You're right, but you'd be amazed how many we get.

    Good post, a voice of reason on a mad thread.
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  • I'm really shocked we've gone from checking for head lice to abuse/tragedy/Ian Huntley in a matter of sentences. It's topics like this that really put me off training to be a teacher.
    One day I will be out of my student debt, one day... :beer:
  • edited 1 December 2009 at 8:07PM
    lineyliney Forumite
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    edited 1 December 2009 at 8:07PM
    Us parents have to be CRB checked in order to go on school trips, or listen to the children read, so i'd put money that the school secretary is.

    What would i do? Absolutely nothing. Mountain and molehill.

    Teachers, and other workers at the school are there to do whatever is in our children's best interest while they are there, and we should trust them to do so unless we are given good cause. If taking a look to see why she is scratching her head is really this much of a problem for you, then maybe Home Schooling would be a better option.

    As for medical knowlege: they are looking for nits, not a rare blood disorder.:D
    "On behalf of teachers, I'd like to dedicate this award to Michael Gove and I mean dedicate in the Anglo Saxon sense which means insert roughly into the anus of." My hero, Mr Steer.
  • HRVHRV Forumite
    290 Posts
    Lots of school office staff are also first aiders as they are the most able to deal with medical issues as they don't have children to care for directly- so I would suggest that they may have been why the secretary was looking. Although she should not be touching her.

    I agree in certain cirmstances little children do need comfort we are always advised that we should never initiate comfort.

    As another poster said it would be inappropriate to call in a school nurse for every case of nit HOWEVER schools do have a school nurse to call on. As a Early years teacher working in a very deprived area we have had to do so in some cases and parents are supported at home to clear their child's hair- unfortunately teachers have to be very careful these days!!!!
  • squashysquashy Forumite
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    Wow what have some people got against school office staff??? We have an extremeley busy and stressful job, in part due to "Safeguarding", I have spent the last month compiling a file to comply with DCSF regulations, updating all the policies, going through staff CRB checks with a fine tooth comb (no pun intended!) to ensure none are overdue or missing. In my role as "secretary" (read Bursar, Business Manager and General Cheif Cook and Bottle Washer into that) I am enhanced CRB checked, Main First Aider, have undergone Safeguarding training, am the point of contact for school nurse issues, manage the Child Protection files, Health and Safety Officer, Fire Warden, treatment for anyphlaxia, the list goes on. Are you saying it is less appropriate for someone like me to look at a child with a problem, or god forbid put my hand on their head?

    Many many times a teacher will bring a child to me for advice about all kinds of rashes and weepy eyes and ears, one of the things I have to decide is whether I think the child could possibly have something infectious in which case get the child sent home. Of course, I am not medically trained and if in any doubt whatsoever I'll ring home. It would be natural to check for nits in an itchy head in order to rule out anything like Scabies, so I could advise that a quick letter home to the class is all that's needed.

    Surely it's better to have one central point of contact for anything like that rather than passing a child from pillar to post around the school comparing opinions?

    Oh and the thing about not touching children ever, well sorry that is just plain ridiculous.
  • daskadaska Forumite
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    miamoo wrote: »
    Just wanted to add that one little girl in DD's class had Nits that badly that you could see them crawling all over her head, the teachers could do nothing about it, other than send a letter to all parents that they had an outbreak in the classroom, this parent ignored the letter, the poor thing was like that all primary.

    The NSPCC regards not treating headlice as neglect. So surely, if the LA won't allow the schools to do anything about it they must bear some responsibility as well.
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