Freezing Rhubarb?

in Old Style MoneySaving
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Replies

  • Shez wrote:
    thanks everyone for the tips, now i know what to do with it!
    there's only so much rhubarb crumble you can eat at a time!!!


    well if you get tired of crumble there's loads of recipes & tips on here

    http://www.rhubarbinfo.com/recipe-index.html
  • ShezShez Forumite
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    wow - just looked at my thread to see all these replies!

    great! thanks ever so much all for your help!
  • jayarr_2jayarr_2 Forumite
    182 Posts
    Is this possible-I've been given a carrier bagfull and although I love it, no-one else in the house does. Would it be possible to maybe stew it and then freeze it, or do I have to use it while fresh..?
    Budget for Jan/Feb £240 per 4 weeks
    Week 1-£52 :rolleyes: Week 2-£75 :eek:
    Week 3-£60.66 :confused:Week 4-£29.98 Total=£217.58
    w/c 18th Feb: £6.50
  • culpepperculpepper Forumite
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    It freezes fine.I have frozen it stewed and raw.Cut it up into 2" bits first.If stewed it will be one big stewy block.
  • newleafnewleaf Forumite
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    Part of the Furniture Combo Breaker PPI Party Pooper
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    Yes, perfectly freezable. You can just cut it into small chunks, bag and freeze if you like, no need to cook it first. I do this then I can either stew it, or use it in pies, crumbles or chutney when the mood takes me.
    Official DFW Nerd No 096 - Proud to have dealt with my debt!
  • Pink.Pink. Forumite
    17.7K Posts
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    Hi Jayarr,

    We have a recent thread on freezing rhubarb, so I have merged your thread with it as it makes it easier for other Old Style readers to find all the suggestions on one thread. As always posts are listed in date order, so you'll need to read from the beginning to see all the replies.

    Another older thread that might help you is: Rhubarb ideas

    Pink
  • SujamjenSujamjen Forumite
    439 Posts
    I usually chop it up into small pieces, stick in a bag and freeze. I didn't know about the blanching thing.

    I use it straight from the bag for crumbles, it always turns out fine.

    ~Lynn


    That's exactly what I do and as Lynn says it is fine - just doesn't need so much cooking! I also use rhubarb as a veg in lamb casseroles (I first tried it at a Moroccan friend's house) it isn't bitter at all, it just takes on the flavour of the sauce.
  • thriftlady_2thriftlady_2 Forumite
    9.1K Posts
    I've been Money Tipped!
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    Shez wrote:
    Ive heard that crumble mix doesnt freeze well? otherwise i could make a crumble and put into freezer.
    I freeze crumble mix with no problems. I make up a big batch, store in a plastic bag and use from frozen. It is always fine.

    I freeze rhubarb raw, cut in chunks and I freeze it stewed if I have some leftover.
  • Ted_HutchinsonTed_Hutchinson
    7.1K Posts
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    If your freezer is getting full of summer fruit don't forget that Fruit Bottling is very simple and very cheap. You can also just unscrew the lid and use, no defrosting or further cooking required. Makes handy presents as well.
    I've been re-using the LIDL'S jars I bought with olives, peppers, pickled onions, cherries. Once these and their lids have been through the the dishwasher and sniff tested to see if you can still smell the previous ontents, they seem to reseal perfectly OK. So far I've bottled gooseberries, strawberries, raspberries and blackcurrants, will be onto the blackberries as soon as they ripen, but there is no reason this method shouldn't also work for rhubarb.
    My weight loss following Doktor Dahlqvist' Dietary Program
    Start 23rd Jan 2008 14st 9lbs Current 10st 12lbs
  • Ted_HutchinsonTed_Hutchinson
    7.1K Posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    If your freezer is getting full of summer fruit don't forget that Fruit Bottling is very simple and very cheap. You can also just unscrew the lid and use, no defrosting or further cooking required. Makes handy presents as well.
    I've been re-using the LIDL'S jars I bought with olives, peppers, pickled onions, cherries. Once these and their lids have been through the the dishwasher and sniff tested to see if you can still smell the previous ontents, they seem to reseal perfectly OK. So far I've bottled gooseberries, strawberries, raspberries and blackcurrants, will be onto the blackberries as soon as they ripen, but there is no reason this method shouldn't also work for rhubarb.

    There is a quicker method of fruit bottling and that is the Quick Water bath method, where you raise the temperature from warm to simmering (190F-87c) in 25-30 mins and maintain for around 10 mins.

    I don't think the first link made it clear that when you put the jars/lids in the water bath you release the lid a quarter turn so there is room for pressure to escape as it warms. You then tighten the lids as you take them out of the hot water.
    My weight loss following Doktor Dahlqvist' Dietary Program
    Start 23rd Jan 2008 14st 9lbs Current 10st 12lbs
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