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  • FIRST POST
    Phlik
    m3 to Kwh conversion factor.....Eon
    • #1
    • 30th Apr 08, 7:43 PM
    m3 to Kwh conversion factor.....Eon 30th Apr 08 at 7:43 PM
    Just this last month changed over to Eon for dual fuel, Energyonline extra saver 5.

    As I'm slightly sad I decided to take meter readings each morning for the next few weeks, monitor my usage and set up a spreadsheet to calculate my bills (told you I was sad )

    Just phoned Eon to find out the conversion factor for m3 to Kwh to calculate the gas bill, apparently its as follows

    (((Reading x 2.8) x1.02264) x 38.9)/3.6

    For an average use per day of 4.6 m3 of gas this gives a quarterly bill larger than some countries national debt (I'm exagerating slightly, but it is bloody huge )

    Does anybody know what Eon's actual conversion factor is, not sure I can stand the excitement of phoning them again.

    Phlik
Page 1
    • squiggles
    • By squiggles 30th Apr 08, 7:56 PM
    • 870 Posts
    • 1,658 Thanks
    squiggles
    • #2
    • 30th Apr 08, 7:56 PM
    • #2
    • 30th Apr 08, 7:56 PM
    Im not an eon customer but i use this site to estimate my gas bills

    http://energylinx.co.uk/gas_meter_conversion.html
  • Phlik
    • #3
    • 30th Apr 08, 8:11 PM
    • #3
    • 30th Apr 08, 8:11 PM
    You're a star, have a thanks


    It was the 2.8 that was throwing it out, you need that in for converting from ft3 to Kwh.

    Phlik
  • moonrakerz
    • #4
    • 1st May 08, 11:12 AM
    • #4
    • 1st May 08, 11:12 AM
    Fairly accurate conversion of m3 to kWh: multiply m3 by 11.

    Rough conversion: multiply by 10.

    Don't worry about calorific correction figures, they vary by fractions of a decimal point.
    • boatman
    • By boatman 1st May 08, 4:22 PM
    • 2,514 Posts
    • 1,628 Thanks
    boatman
    • #5
    • 1st May 08, 4:22 PM
    • #5
    • 1st May 08, 4:22 PM
    Thats exactly what i do, multiply by 11, simple.
  • mprice1988
    • #6
    • 1st May 08, 5:29 PM
    • #6
    • 1st May 08, 5:29 PM
    At Scottish and southern we calculate our gas as follows

    Reading x 1.02264 x 2.83 x 39 / 3.6 = kwh used
    • SwanJon
    • By SwanJon 1st May 08, 5:41 PM
    • 2,318 Posts
    • 890 Thanks
    SwanJon
    • #7
    • 1st May 08, 5:41 PM
    • #7
    • 1st May 08, 5:41 PM
    At Scottish and southern we calculate our gas as follows

    Reading x 1.02264 x 2.83 x 39 / 3.6 = kwh used
    Originally posted by mprice1988
    Only if you are converting from hundreds of cubic feet, If you are converting from cubic meters leave out the 2.83 (as mentioned above).

    And in case someone gets the wrong idea, don't just use your reading, use the difference between your current reading and the last one.

    [Sorry, one of those days when everything needs to be explained]
  • basilp
    • #8
    • 29th Aug 10, 11:40 AM
    Gas conversion Equation
    • #8
    • 29th Aug 10, 11:40 AM
    The conversion equation you quoted is correct. You have to be careful with the units though. You HAVE to enter the reading in hft3(hecto cubic ft or 100xft3). Most older gas meters (including mine) read in cubic feet (ft3) but the last two digits (usually in read) are ignored in the meter readings. Thus the meter readings read and quoted by the companies are in 100xft3 and NOT in ft3. I think that is where your frightening paradox lies.
    If you really want to know more about the gas conversion equation:
    1 hft3 = 100 ft3= 2.8317 m3 this explains the first factor.
    1.02264 is a "bodge factor" to correct from the nominal (assumed by the company gas temperature and pressure from the "standard values" of 15 °C and 1013 mBar assumed in the calculation of the calorific value
    39.3 is the currently quoted "calorific value of gas" by Eon.This converts from M3 to MJ /m3 (MJ stands for Mega Joule, 1 joule = 1 Ws -watt second). Typical values of "calorific value" of natural gas range from 37.5 - 43 MJ/m3 depending on how rich it is on heat generating hydrocarbons (Methane etc.).
    Finally the 3.6 divider is supposed to convert from seconds to hours required for the final kWh figure (1h = 3600 s ; the 1000 factor together with another 1000 factor for the kW is cancelled by the mega = 1000000 factor in the calorific value).
    I hope that this is all clear to you but if you have any more questions just shout !

    Just this last month changed over to Eon for dual fuel, Energyonline extra saver 5.

    As I'm slightly sad I decided to take meter readings each morning for the next few weeks, monitor my usage and set up a spreadsheet to calculate my bills (told you I was sad )

    Just phoned Eon to find out the conversion factor for m3 to Kwh to calculate the gas bill, apparently its as follows

    (((Reading x 2.8) x1.02264) x 38.9)/3.6

    For an average use per day of 4.6 m3 of gas this gives a quarterly bill larger than some countries national debt (I'm exagerating slightly, but it is bloody huge )

    Does anybody know what Eon's actual conversion factor is, not sure I can stand the excitement of phoning them again.

    Phlik
    Originally posted by Phlik
  • moonrakerz
    • #9
    • 29th Aug 10, 11:53 AM
    • #9
    • 29th Aug 10, 11:53 AM
    I hope that this is all clear to you but if you have any more questions just shout !
    Originally posted by basilp
    They will have to shout very loudly - that thread was over two years old
  • Marathon_Pete
    But still very relevant today - I called NPower and they couldnt tell me a conversion rate!
    • minicooper272
    • By minicooper272 27th Jan 11, 11:54 AM
    • 2,077 Posts
    • 16,650 Thanks
    minicooper272
    I was in a flat last year and had a meter that used about 4 units/day and this cost approximately £35/month (so i hope you're in a similar flat!). I just moved into a new, smaller flat and was delighted when my meter only clocked about 0.8 units a day but, somehow, this also costs £35/month!

    I'm really confused about this... someone help!!!
    • macman
    • By macman 27th Jan 11, 12:07 PM
    • 40,036 Posts
    • 16,195 Thanks
    macman
    Old flat was on a metric meter (a unit is a cu m), new flat is on an older imperial meter (a unit is 100 cu ft). So a metric unit has far less energy value and will run up the units faster.
    As explained above, the conversion factor is 2.83, so your 4 old units should be around 1.4 units now.
    If you are still paying the same for 0.8 units. that's because the price has gone up!
    To compare usage properly, always use the final kWh figure, which is what you are actually billed in.
    Last edited by macman; 27-01-2011 at 12:10 PM.
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
  • borisba
    to calculate cubic meter of natural gas we need to know correction factor(1,02264). i want to know how can we calculate this factor?is there a formula?
  • DVardysShadow
    to calculate cubic meter of natural gas we need to know correction factor(1,02264). i want to know how can we calculate this factor?is there a formula?
    Originally posted by borisba
    The correction factor 1.02264 is not exactly calculated, it is measured and changes according to the quality and purity of the gas delivered.

    What is the overall problem you are trying to solve?
    • stewie_griffin
    • By stewie_griffin 19th Sep 11, 5:37 PM
    • 487 Posts
    • 145 Thanks
    stewie_griffin
    The correction factor 1.02264 is not exactly calculated, it is measured and changes according to the quality and purity of the gas delivered.

    What is the overall problem you are trying to solve?
    Originally posted by DVardysShadow
    The correction factor is a constant and doesn't change. The calorific value changes with the quality of the gas.

    From the BG website:

    Correction factor (CF)
    Used to convert gas units into kilowatt-hours (kWh). The correction factor (1.02264) takes into account changes in the volume of gas based on temperature and pressure.
  • borisba
    i need to convert m3 in energy(kWh) without knowing enything about calorific value of gas..i need some nuber to multiply
    m3...like m3*10,54=---kWh,
    but i want to know how to get that number..i need explanation..so i dont understand now, is this correction factor a constant or not?..enyway thank you very much for trying..
    • notbritishgas
    • By notbritishgas 20th Sep 11, 3:08 PM
    • 1,946 Posts
    • 844 Thanks
    notbritishgas
    i need to convert m3 in energy(kWh) without knowing enything about calorific value of gas..i need some nuber to multiply
    m3...like m3*10,54=---kWh,
    but i want to know how to get that number..i need explanation..so i dont understand now, is this correction factor a constant or not?..enyway thank you very much for trying..
    Originally posted by borisba
    Believe me you do not really want to know how to get there but just multiply the M3 figure by 11.2, the variables vary by quite a small amount so as not to make too much differnce.

    However if you insist:
    M3 xCalorific value 39.4 x volume correction 1.02264 / 3.6 = 11.1922

    These are the figures for the East Mids area at the moment,some values may change slightly eg calorific value
    • Candy53
    • By Candy53 30th Oct 11, 5:28 PM
    • 2,426 Posts
    • 2,813 Thanks
    Candy53
    I've been searching all afternoon trying to find out Eon's present 'calorific value', and was brought to this thread.

    I've just switched to Eon for gas from Npower and their calorific value was always the same. I want to calculate my bill before it arrives, but I've found out the value changes from area to area.

    So, is there anyone from Lincolnshire, or N.E.Lincs who can look on their last Eon bill and post what the calorific value was please?

    Thanks,
    Candy.
    What goes around, comes around.
  • jalexa
    I've just switched to Eon for gas from Npower and their calorific value was always the same...
    Originally posted by Candy53
    At any period in time it is the same for all suppliers in the same region, so use your Npower figure.

    If you particularly want the figure fine, but a good kWhr approximation will be obtained by multiplying cubic metres by 11 (or the slightly more accurate multiplier given in an earlier post).
    Last edited by jalexa; 30-10-2011 at 7:05 PM.
    • Candy53
    • By Candy53 30th Oct 11, 7:17 PM
    • 2,426 Posts
    • 2,813 Thanks
    Candy53
    Thanks for replying jalexa.

    I'll carry on my calculating then. I always work out my bills after giving in the readings to make sure the bills are right. They make so many mistakes these days.

    Candy.
    What goes around, comes around.
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