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  • FIRST POST
    dorsetmiss
    Quinces: Anyone know about making quince jelly please?
    • #1
    • 28th Oct 06, 12:18 PM
    Quinces: Anyone know about making quince jelly please? 28th Oct 06 at 12:18 PM
    I was given some quinces and thought I'd make some quince jelly. I've got to the simmering in water til soft stage but thought that the 'mush' would be a pinky colour, (isn't quince jelly pink?), whereas its actually yellowy/green. Now wondering if I've used the quinces before they were ripe:rolleyes: A quick squiz on the net seems to indicate that they should be yellow to be ripe whereas these were more green! Is it worth continuing do you think or should I just bin the lot? I'm so disappointed as the smell from the quinces was wonderful.....
    Learn the rules so you know how to break them properly!
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    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 28th Oct 06, 1:22 PM
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    thriftlady
    • #2
    • 28th Oct 06, 1:22 PM
    • #2
    • 28th Oct 06, 1:22 PM
    I know about quinces

    First off, have you got quinces from a tree like these Quince tree link

    or are they japonica quinces from a bush like these ? Japonica quince



    Blimey, sorry for the long links
    I would say for both fruit the greener the fruit the better the set. Unripe fruit has more pectin But you need some to be nice and ripe too. I make jelly with tree quinces and whilst they are cooking to a mush they are a pretty yellowish looking mixture. Maybe they could do with some more cooking, I generally give them at least an hour.

    The jelly should indeed be pinky amber when finished, but I think you'll find when you boil the juice up with the sugar (after a night spent in the jelly bag),it will darken and get pinker.
    Last edited by squeaky; 29-10-2006 at 3:15 PM.
  • dorsetmiss
    • #3
    • 28th Oct 06, 2:20 PM
    • #3
    • 28th Oct 06, 2:20 PM
    Oooh there is always someone to help out on this site

    The quinces are the Chaenomeles ones I think, (2nd link), they are on a bush thingy which is growing up the front of a friend's house. I've had a little bashlet with a small quantity to see what happened........(Overnight in a jelly bag!!!!! I just whacked them through a sieve!!) Very quickly reached setting point....could easily have ended up with quince toffe, (or glue!). The taste is very unusual, intense and just a bit astringent tho not unpleasant. Not pink though! Was wondering about cooking up a batch of Bramley Apples and combining the 2 mixes? Would that work :confused:


    Thanks for the help so far






    Learn the rules so you know how to break them properly!
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 28th Oct 06, 6:39 PM
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    thriftlady
    • #4
    • 28th Oct 06, 6:39 PM
    • #4
    • 28th Oct 06, 6:39 PM
    Looks great Dorsetmiss
    Its along time since I clapped eyes on chaenomeles jelly so can't remember what colour it should be, but definitely in the amber to pink range rather than red to purple tree quinces (cydonia oblonga) do make a lovely pink jelly very close to the colour of crab apple jelly.
    • morganlefay
    • By morganlefay 29th Oct 06, 1:28 PM
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    morganlefay
    • #5
    • 29th Oct 06, 1:28 PM
    Took me ages to find the book.....
    • #5
    • 29th Oct 06, 1:28 PM
    From Jane Grigson’s fruit book

    Good if you have a mix of perfect and not so perfect fruit. If you don’t have very many add windfall or cooking apples up to half the weight of the quinces.

    Set aside three of four nice quinces after washing them all and rubbing away any grey fluff. Cut the rest up into chunks and put them in a preserving pan half full of water.
    Peel the best quinces then slice and core them neatly. Throw cores and peel into the pan. Lay the slices on top. If the water doesn’t cover the fruit add some more. Bring to the boil and simmer till the fruit on top is completely tender, remove the slices with a slotted spoon. Boil the panful hard, crushing it down occasionally with a spud masher. When the fruit is completely pulpy strain through a jelly bag.

    Measure the quantity, for each 600ml juice allow 500g sugar ( that’s a pound to a pint), put the reserved slices into the juice and boil hard until a set is reached. Put the slices into two or three sterilized jam jars, then top up with jelly. Put any remaining jelly into more jars. Cover and store in cool, dark place. The preserved slices can be used for adding to apple pies during the winter. When you add the sugar to the juice you could also add spices – say a cinnamon stick and a few cloves.

    Obviously you don’t have to do this thing with the slices but I thought it sounded quite good and might try it if I can find any big enough to make it worthwhile peeling them !

    I wasn't sure about the 'grey fluff' though that's what she says !
  • PONDSAVER
    • #6
    • 29th Oct 06, 1:32 PM
    • #6
    • 29th Oct 06, 1:32 PM
    M grandfather has a quince bush in his garden but he has never done anything with them - so maybe I could give the jelly a shot but what would it then be used for is it like a marmalade?
    Lightbulb moment 10-06-06
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    Total debt approx £33,000 Oct 2006
    Jan 07....to be worked out but may have gone up GULP:confused:
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    • wendym
    • By wendym 29th Oct 06, 1:37 PM
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    wendym
    • #7
    • 29th Oct 06, 1:37 PM
    • #7
    • 29th Oct 06, 1:37 PM
    The 'grey fluff' doesn't refer to the little fruits from chaenomeles, but the pear-sized (and shaped) quinces that grow on trees rather than bushes. They are much harder to find, although last winter my Waitrose sold them, and I treated myself to just one to add to apples, as my tree produced just one, which dropped into my neighbours' garden and was badly damaged when they threw it back. This year I don't have a single quince.
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 29th Oct 06, 7:42 PM
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    thriftlady
    • #8
    • 29th Oct 06, 7:42 PM
    • #8
    • 29th Oct 06, 7:42 PM
    My quince tree only produced 2 or 3 the first year it fruited, next year it was about 6, then I too had a barren year. But ever since (last 4-5 years) I've had 50- 70 fruit

    This year I've made jelly, stewed some for the freezer, added some to apple crumble, made beef and quince tagine, pureed some for stirring into yogurt and freezing, baked some like apples,made quince muffins (delicious), made a cobbler with some and 2 bottles of quince vodka. I also gave away a huge box and still have a basket of them in the garage. There are also many rotting on the ground, but hey, I'm all quinced out:rolleyes:
    • wendym
    • By wendym 29th Oct 06, 8:32 PM
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    wendym
    • #9
    • 29th Oct 06, 8:32 PM
    • #9
    • 29th Oct 06, 8:32 PM
    I'm open-mouthed with astonishment and envy, thriftlady!

    Jane Grigson starts her section with 'first catch your quince'.

    My tree fruits less each year. I think it's about 10 years old now. I wonder whether you living in such a fruit-producing area has anything to do with it?
    Or perhaps my husband's maniac pruning sessions have discouraged it.

    We finished the last of our quince vodka at New Year. Ah well.....
  • dorsetmiss
    M grandfather has a quince bush in his garden but he has never done anything with them - so maybe I could give the jelly a shot but what would it then be used for is it like a marmalade?
    by PONDSAVER
    I had a dollop of mine today with mature cheddar cheese and oat biscuits and it was yummy...should think it would go well with cold meats too. So glad I persevered and didn't bin the lot! Got 5 jars of all quince jelly and 5 of apple and quince. Wish I'd known about the thing with the slices though as it sounds nice! Will know for next year.

    Now, about this quince vodka........... does anyone have a recipe
    Learn the rules so you know how to break them properly!
  • PONDSAVER
    yes I seem interested in the quincce vodka too......
    Lightbulb moment 10-06-06
    Total debt £36,996.70 June 2006
    Total debt approx £33,000 Oct 2006
    Jan 07....to be worked out but may have gone up GULP:confused:
    DFD March 2011
    DFW Nerd 111

    19 jan 23 feb 5 weeks - grocery challenge £250
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 31st Oct 06, 6:59 PM
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    thriftlady
    Quice vodka
    I didn't really follow a recipe I'm afraid, but this is what I did

    I bought a 1.5 litre bottle of Tesco's vodka.
    I grated 3 large quinces, peel, cores and all.
    I put the vodka into 2 large jars with half the quince and 2/3 cup of sugar in each.
    Screwed the lids on and have put them in the garage for 2 months. Should be ready for Christmas

    HTH
    • frankie1star
    • By frankie1star 7th Oct 07, 10:22 PM
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    frankie1star
    quince jelly recipe
    I have searched the recipe forum, with no luck, does anyone have a tried and tested method, as I have acquired some quices today, and I need to convert them to jelly, quick. What should they look like, how firm/ripe should they be
    • Pink.
    • By Pink. 7th Oct 07, 11:22 PM
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    Pink.
    Hi frankie,

    There's an older thread that should help you so I've merged your thread with it to keep all the suggestions together. apprentice tycoon has also posted a recipe for quince preserve on this thread:

    What is a Quince?

    Pink
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 8th Oct 07, 7:18 AM
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    thriftlady
    This post might help you Frankie -the basic method is the same for any fruit http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.html?p=2633078#post2633078


    I've yet to pick my quinces this year. I still have some jelly from last year and I've already got shelves bursting with crab apple jelly, blackberry jelly and blackcurrant jam I'm not sure I need quince jelly as well. I think I'm going to stew most of them and turn them into puree to have with yogurt/cream or to add to apples. I'm definitely doing the vodka again though

    Good luck with your qunices Frankie
    • ampersand
    • By ampersand 24th Oct 07, 11:30 AM
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    ampersand
    Quince vodka-fine tuning, please.
    I didn't really follow a recipe I'm afraid, but this is what I did

    I bought a 1.5 litre bottle of Tesco's vodka.
    I grated 3 large quinces, peel, cores and all.
    I put the vodka into 2 large jars with half the quince and 2/3 cup of sugar in each.
    Screwed the lids on and have put them in the garage for 2 months. Should be ready for Christmas

    HTH
    Originally posted by thriftlady
    ##########
    Hello thriftlady - a year on from your original posts, but it IS that time of year and I have 10 quinces(9lbs/4.5k weight apx)
    I don't have '2 large jars' with screw lids. Suggested substitutes please?
    Is it the glass or screw top element that's more important?
    Or both?
    Could I use a large glazed crock(no lid to it)and cover it some other way?
    Several layers of cling film, tightly fastened?
    Finally, did you filter it after 2 months and then bottle?
    I'll do jelly and would like to do pâté des coings with the pulp, or will I have to throw this away and use whole quinces?
    All help appreciated - thankyou.
    .
    Last edited by ampersand; 24-10-2007 at 11:52 AM.
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 24th Oct 07, 7:30 PM
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    thriftlady
    Hi Ampersand,
    I don't think the glass jars are essential. This year I'd already used my jars for damson gin so I put the quince vodka back in the vodka bottle plus another empty bottle which had a screw top. I think the screwtop helps as it is a good idea to give them the odd shake now and again (sorry, don't think I mentioned that in my original post -not vital though). I think your suggestion of cling film will work

    If you use ordinary spirit bottles it will obviously take some time and effort to stuff the grated quince into them. I was cursing myself for not investing in a couple of large preserving jars. I think a crock will be fine, these are the sort of jars used for making rumtopf or hodgkin after all, and that is the same principle (alcohol and fruit).

    Yes, I did strain the quince vodka at Christmas. I strained it twice into a big bowl before putting it back in the original vodka bottles. There is a certain amount of sediment with quince vodka. you will find it looks quite cloudy and bitty. But leave it to settle and you get a lovely clear golden drink with some sediment at the bottom, so pour carefully.

    As for the pate de coings (or quince cheese in english and membrillo in Spanish ) I haven't tried this yet but I'm pretty sure you can use the pulp from making jelly. In fact, a quick google reveals this page which confirms that you can. I wish I hadn't chucked my jelly pulp now http://www.cottagesmallholder.com/?p=467
    HTH and enjoy your vodka
    • ampersand
    • By ampersand 24th Oct 07, 8:32 PM
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    ampersand
    Great minds, thriftlady, and thankyou - I had found http://www.cottagesmallholder.com/?p=467 in the interim and suddenly a rather large amount of time had passed as I roamed through some pleasurable reading there. Am supposedly enduring enforced immobility for a fair while, but one has to move at times - cabin fever et al - and today was a grey soul-destroyer.
    I've realised I'll need to core the quinces if I'm to moneysavingly use the pulp for pâté afterwards.
    Someone's tip re:ironing the muslin/straining cloth for sterilising is so obvious now I've read it - never occurred to me before.
    Have just mashed the pulp - now to strain.
    Thankyou again.
    Last edited by ampersand; 24-10-2007 at 8:35 PM.
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 24th Oct 07, 8:39 PM
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    thriftlady
    I've realised I'll need to core the quinces if I'm to moneysavingly use the pulp for pât! afterwards.
    Someone's tip re:ironing the muslin/straining cloth for sterilising is so obvious now I've read it - never occurred to me before.
    Have just mashed the pulp - now to strain.
    Thankyou again.
    Originally posted by ampersand
    That is a good tip about ironing the muslin, thanks.

    I'd forgotten about the cores too -that's why I make jelly, no peeling or coring. Oh well, I might get round to quince cheese one of these days.
    • ampersand
    • By ampersand 24th Oct 07, 9:13 PM
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    ampersand
    GRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Although I had 6 strands of wool around muslin to string up mash for straining, it still broke and lurched bowl & juice over ironing board,cascading down kitchen cupboard. In fact, loss looks worse than it is, as always with spillage.
    Double braid also broke, but I was prepared.
    Big petersham ribbon next;it's dripping away decently now.
    Last edited by ampersand; 24-10-2007 at 9:17 PM.
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