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  • FIRST POST
    • Loobyloo1us
    • By Loobyloo1us 11th Jul 18, 10:18 AM
    • 42Posts
    • 8Thanks
    Loobyloo1us
    Online scam - Fashion Centre #579890
    • #1
    • 11th Jul 18, 10:18 AM
    Online scam - Fashion Centre #579890 11th Jul 18 at 10:18 AM
    I sent the email below to the Forum Team last night. So apologies for cross posting.

    Hiya, I am a member of the MSE Forum but can't find the place for new messages or how to talk to someone about the problem I have got.

    I received a parcel from a firm called Fashion Central, of Larnaca, Cyprus with just a delivery note inside stating that I had ordered it on the 16th May, 2018 and was shipped on 17th. It was cheap tat, a watch and a necklace with LOVE on it. I just thought it was a freebie from a catalogue I use. On the 25 June I received an identical package and still thought nothing worrying about it.

    Last week when I checked my bank statements I was horrified to see that the following amounts had been withdrawn from my account:

    17.5.2018 6.99 Thesweetest 17.5.2018 5.98 Weasygoing
    31.5.2018 84.00 Thesweetest 31.5.2018 82.00 Weasygoing
    25.6.2018 84.00 Thesweetest 25.6.2018 82.00 Weasygoing

    I have contacted my bank, Lloyds Fraud Department and they immediately checked my statement and took my statement, cancelled my card and credited my account with the missing 344.94. They said that an investigation would be held and that they would get back to me.

    I received their letter yesterday 9th July, 2018 which said that Fashion Central (Thesweetest/Weasygoing) had provided proof that I had placed the order and clicked the terms and conditions box. The long and the short of it is that the small amount was the delivery and admin for the parcel and because I did not contact them I had agreed to join their VIP Membership Club! I emailed Fashion Central yesterday and they have basically told me that they have proof and that I am still liable for the 344.94.

    I am adamant that I did not order these goods nor ticked the terms and conditions. What do I do next? I phoned the bank today and spoke to an agent in their Fraud Department who said that the order had been placed on the 16th May at 9.07am (very precise) and they have said that because I cannot dispute the evidence then the matter is on the side of Fashion Central and I have to say bye bye to the money. It is a large amount of money I cannot afford to lose as an OAP.

    I am so annoyed about this I have checked the browsing history on my PC and have found that on 16th May my husband read his emails at 8.56 am and I logged into Facebook at 9.48am. That's nearly an hour's gap inbetween. I have copied and printed it off as evidence.

    In the letter from Weasygoing and Thesweetest (Fashion Central) they state that the order was made from IP address: 85.25.156.50.
    I have managed to find my IP address (I have a printed out of all my computer details) and this is not my IP address. It relates to a Virginmedia account in Cosham, which is in the north of Portsmouth. I live in Southsea, Portsmouth.

    I am sorry this email is so long. I am just so stressed about this and want to know if I can still do anything to recover my money.
Page 3
    • seashore22
    • By seashore22 11th Jul 18, 8:50 PM
    • 1,141 Posts
    • 2,575 Thanks
    seashore22
    Could 9.07 be the time in Cyprus, if that's where the website is based?
    • zagfles
    • By zagfles 12th Jul 18, 7:51 AM
    • 13,318 Posts
    • 11,290 Thanks
    zagfles
    "One thing is, how did the company get your address and card details. Most internet programmes, MS EDGE, Google Chrome etc have facilities for storing your card details. Mine does. If you left phone or other trinket around, then anyone can access an unsecured phone! I know mine are locked!


    So if you left your work PC? with card details and unlocked, they could have been ordered this way. For the PC to have done this, you would have to allow the PC to store these details. My work PC does not!

    Details that are stored.
    Name
    Name of Card User
    Card Number
    Address


    What is not stored
    Your security code on the rear of the card"

    I've been told that my card details ie on JustEat, Asos etc could have been compromised. I am retired so therefore do not have a work PC, only my home one. I know you all think I am, or someone in my house ordered this stuff. I'm going to stop this thread because it's like having your identity stolen - no-one believes you and I certainly don't need the hassle. I was asking for help and I seem to have got the opposite.
    Originally posted by Loobyloo1us
    The usual on this board. You should have seen the Amazon thread, they were throwing their toys out of the pram when everyone got refunds Card details could easily have been compromised eg a dodgy employee writing down details when taking an order on the phone etc. Persue with your bank, in writing. Good luck!
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 12th Jul 18, 8:15 AM
    • 20,659 Posts
    • 55,517 Thanks
    Pollycat
    The usual on this board. You should have seen the Amazon thread, they were throwing their toys out of the pram when everyone got refunds Card details could easily have been compromised eg a dodgy employee writing down details when taking an order on the phone etc. Persue with your bank, in writing. Good luck!
    Originally posted by zagfles
    I think you'll find that it was the posters who insisted they hadn't signed up to Prime who threw their toys out of the pram when screenshots clearly showed that they had indeed signed up to Prime.


    Drama queen behaviour about cancelling credit cards, reporting Amazon to various organisations when it was very simple to contact Amazon to ask for a refund.


    No correlation with this thread at all.
    • Todorovia
    • By Todorovia 12th Jul 18, 9:57 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    Todorovia
    Survey
    Sadly, I have been involved with this same company and I do consider it to be a scam, though I admit immediately that I have been foolish.

    I completed a survey on behalf of, or what I thought at the time was, the Daily Telegraph. As a supposed thank you for taking this survey I was informed that I could buy a watch for 6.99. I filled out the form with my details and received the watch. I did not check my bank account and so missed a payment of 84. Yesterday I received another watch and on checking my bank account, another 84 had been debited.

    I will swear on the original 'order form' there was nothing to say about the first watch being sent as a 'trial', but of course have no way of proving that now.

    In my opinion, this company ARE scammers but as there is no proof as above, I have to bear the loss and bemoan my stupidity in thinking the survey originated from the Daily Telegraph.

    I suspect the OP has done the same as I have, or something very similar, despite their protestations to the contrary, and I am genuinely sorry that this has happened to them. There are some low-life companies out there and this is one of them. There ought to be a way of shutting them down but what that way is, I do not know.
    • camelot1971
    • By camelot1971 12th Jul 18, 2:14 PM
    • 881 Posts
    • 1,348 Thanks
    camelot1971
    There ought to be a way of shutting them down but what that way is, I do not know.
    Originally posted by Todorovia
    If only there was a way for people to read up on what they sign up for.
    • Le_Kirk
    • By Le_Kirk 12th Jul 18, 3:53 PM
    • 3,206 Posts
    • 2,119 Thanks
    Le_Kirk
    Just a tip Loobyloo use the quote button when replying to a post, makes it easier for posters to see which post your replying too.
    Originally posted by DCFC79
    Good tip (some new users fall into this habit quite frequently - and some experienced posters) but I doubt the OP will be back, having declare herself "out" presumably because we were not giving the answers she wanted to hear. Advice given was good and OP should continue to pursue with the bank.
    • zagfles
    • By zagfles 12th Jul 18, 6:59 PM
    • 13,318 Posts
    • 11,290 Thanks
    zagfles
    I think you'll find that it was the posters who insisted they hadn't signed up to Prime who threw their toys out of the pram when screenshots clearly showed that they had indeed signed up to Prime.


    Drama queen behaviour about cancelling credit cards, reporting Amazon to various organisations when it was very simple to contact Amazon to ask for a refund.


    No correlation with this thread at all.
    Originally posted by Pollycat
    It has the usual "customer must be to blame" attitude. Proved completely wrong in the Amazon case as they were refunding, and proved wrong in many other cases as well. Not the mention the shyster sites one

    Probably this one too.

    Although not everyone of course - several people here have suggested OP pursuing with their bank, which is likely to be be the best course of action.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 12th Jul 18, 7:10 PM
    • 20,659 Posts
    • 55,517 Thanks
    Pollycat
    It has the usual "customer must be to blame" attitude. Proved completely wrong in the Amazon case as they were refunding, and proved wrong in many other cases as well. Not the mention the shyster sites one
    Originally posted by zagfles
    Actually proved wrong with screen shots from the Amazon website.
    The 'customer WAS to blame'.
    Even if they wouldn't admit it
    I have no idea what 'shyster' sites you are referring to
    • zagfles
    • By zagfles 12th Jul 18, 10:54 PM
    • 13,318 Posts
    • 11,290 Thanks
    zagfles
    Sadly, I have been involved with this same company and I do consider it to be a scam, though I admit immediately that I have been foolish.

    I completed a survey on behalf of, or what I thought at the time was, the Daily Telegraph. As a supposed thank you for taking this survey I was informed that I could buy a watch for 6.99. I filled out the form with my details and received the watch. I did not check my bank account and so missed a payment of 84. Yesterday I received another watch and on checking my bank account, another 84 had been debited.

    I will swear on the original 'order form' there was nothing to say about the first watch being sent as a 'trial', but of course have no way of proving that now.
    Originally posted by Todorovia
    You don't need to prove anything, the retailer needs to prove you authorised the transactions.
    In my opinion, this company ARE scammers but as there is no proof as above, I have to bear the loss and bemoan my stupidity in thinking the survey originated from the Daily Telegraph.

    I suspect the OP has done the same as I have, or something very similar, despite their protestations to the contrary, and I am genuinely sorry that this has happened to them. There are some low-life companies out there and this is one of them. There ought to be a way of shutting them down but what that way is, I do not know.
    There is. You complain to your bank, so do lots of other customers, and they'll soon have their card handling facilities removed.
    • zagfles
    • By zagfles 12th Jul 18, 11:05 PM
    • 13,318 Posts
    • 11,290 Thanks
    zagfles
    Actually proved wrong with screen shots from the Amazon website.
    The 'customer WAS to blame'.
    Even if they wouldn't admit it
    Originally posted by Pollycat
    Yeah, Amazon are just so nice that they refund when they were right! Really annoyed some of the bitter "it's all the stupid customer's fault" brigade
    I have no idea what 'shyster' sites you are referring to
    Copycat govt websites. Passport, EHIC, driving licences etc. Some people here reckoned these sites were perfectly legitimate and OK because they had a disclaimer somewhere. Several court cases proved them wrong
    • takman
    • By takman 13th Jul 18, 9:25 PM
    • 3,646 Posts
    • 3,275 Thanks
    takman
    Yeah, Amazon are just so nice that they refund when they were right! Really annoyed some of the bitter "it's all the stupid customer's fault" brigade
    Originally posted by zagfles
    Companies often refund and give gestures of goodwill when they don't really need to so they maintain a good image.

    Copycat govt websites. Passport, EHIC, driving licences etc. Some people here reckoned these sites were perfectly legitimate and OK because they had a disclaimer somewhere. Several court cases proved them wrong
    Originally posted by zagfles
    These websites were very obviously not the official sites but people don't pay attention, don't read things properly and fall for lots of scams. But these people need to be protected so that's why strict consumer law is put in place.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 14th Jul 18, 7:43 AM
    • 20,659 Posts
    • 55,517 Thanks
    Pollycat
    Yeah, Amazon are just so nice that they refund when they were right! Really annoyed some of the bitter "it's all the stupid customer's fault" brigadeCopycat govt websites. Passport, EHIC, driving licences etc. Some people here reckoned these sites were perfectly legitimate and OK because they had a disclaimer somewhere. Several court cases proved them wrong
    Originally posted by zagfles
    Why are you trying to derail the OP's thread with something that has no relevance whatsoever?
    • zagfles
    • By zagfles 14th Jul 18, 9:39 AM
    • 13,318 Posts
    • 11,290 Thanks
    zagfles
    Why are you trying to derail the OP's thread with something that has no relevance whatsoever?
    Originally posted by Pollycat
    It is relevant - the OP was getting exasperated at people implying it's all her fault and she won't get her money back - I was pointing out that people that say that sort of thing have been proved wrong time and time again, eg Amazon, shyster sites, gaming consoles etc. So encouraging her not to give up, and pursue with her bank.
    Last edited by zagfles; 14-07-2018 at 9:41 AM.
    • tonyh66
    • By tonyh66 15th Jul 18, 3:56 PM
    • 1,222 Posts
    • 856 Thanks
    tonyh66
    Back to the original OP problem, you say your husband checked his emails at 8.56am less than 20mins before purchase, could it be possible he clicked through a link on one of his emails and signed up for his 'free' watch without checking the T&Cs
    • pmduk
    • By pmduk 15th Jul 18, 7:19 PM
    • 8,991 Posts
    • 6,723 Thanks
    pmduk
    As the OP has stated her intention to disregard us why are we even bothering with her problem?
    • robatwork
    • By robatwork 16th Jul 18, 8:05 PM
    • 4,528 Posts
    • 5,072 Thanks
    robatwork
    She had me up to "85.25.156.50" is an address in Cosham. Firstly that's close enough to her home to be dispostive. Also that address is actually from Germany, so someone isn't telling the whole truth.

    100-1 someone signed up from her PC.
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