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  • FIRST POST
    • Mrsbarwocle
    • By Mrsbarwocle 17th Feb 17, 6:54 PM
    • 2Posts
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    Mrsbarwocle
    Replacement conservatory roof advice please
    • #1
    • 17th Feb 17, 6:54 PM
    Replacement conservatory roof advice please 17th Feb 17 at 6:54 PM
    I am planning to replace my existing 3x2 m polycarbonate conservatory roof built approx 10 years ago and cannot decide which type of roof to choose.
    I've had a quote for a Guardian roof from a trusted local installer for 6400 which includes internal plastering and replacement guttering.A friend also recommended a local builder who would insulate the existing roof, plasterboard and skim, he quoted 3500 which I thought was a bit steep
    I have also seen adverts for Thermolite panels which replace the existing polycarbonate. There is also the glass roof option but I don't want too much glare.
    I am totally confused and the loss of light in the adjoining room is a factor to consider if I were to opt for a solid roof.
    Does anyone have any advice/ suggestions? Thanks
Page 1
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 17th Feb 17, 9:31 PM
    • 2,917 Posts
    • 3,268 Thanks
    glasgowdan
    • #2
    • 17th Feb 17, 9:31 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Feb 17, 9:31 PM
    What does 'insulate the existing roof' actually mean? Is he going to stick boards up against the plastic? Build a timber framework to fix the new ceiling to?
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 18th Feb 17, 6:47 AM
    • 27,705 Posts
    • 73,721 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #3
    • 18th Feb 17, 6:47 AM
    • #3
    • 18th Feb 17, 6:47 AM
    A real roof on a proper extension wouldn't cost 6400. It probably wouldn't cost 3500 either.

    I have a builder friend who had someone fit a
    suspended ceiling like you find in offices. They stiffed the area above with insulation. It cost less than 1000 for two conservatories and, to me, seems in line with what one should spend on a structure that is not permanent.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 18th Feb 17, 7:57 AM
    • 2,917 Posts
    • 3,268 Thanks
    glasgowdan
    • #4
    • 18th Feb 17, 7:57 AM
    • #4
    • 18th Feb 17, 7:57 AM
    But that leaves you with a void between polycarb roof and the outside of some foil lined boards? Not sure, I can't picture it.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 18th Feb 17, 8:24 AM
    • 27,705 Posts
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    Doozergirl
    • #5
    • 18th Feb 17, 8:24 AM
    • #5
    • 18th Feb 17, 8:24 AM
    I'm not sure what the problem with a void is.

    You cannot see anything from outside. I presumed they put rockwool in for less weight on the ceiling and ease.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • SplanK
    • By SplanK 18th Feb 17, 8:30 AM
    • 1,069 Posts
    • 898 Thanks
    SplanK
    • #6
    • 18th Feb 17, 8:30 AM
    • #6
    • 18th Feb 17, 8:30 AM
    I'm not sure what the problem with a void is.

    You cannot see anything from outside..
    Originally posted by Doozergirl


    Maybe trying to point out ventilation of the void??
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 18th Feb 17, 11:15 AM
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    glasgowdan
    • #7
    • 18th Feb 17, 11:15 AM
    • #7
    • 18th Feb 17, 11:15 AM
    It would just look pretty ugly. I can see my conservatory roof from the garden. Just wondered if there was some liner that you out up close to the roof over a flat plaster ceiling.

    Also, would typical conservatory framework support the weight of a timber ceiling framework plus boards plus plaster?
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 18th Feb 17, 11:26 AM
    • 27,705 Posts
    • 73,721 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #8
    • 18th Feb 17, 11:26 AM
    • #8
    • 18th Feb 17, 11:26 AM
    It would just look pretty ugly. I can see my conservatory roof from the garden. Just wondered if there was some liner that you out up close to the roof over a flat plaster ceiling.

    Also, would typical conservatory framework support the weight of a timber ceiling framework plus boards plus plaster?
    Originally posted by glasgowdan
    I'm talking about a suspended ceiling, like in offices. Lightweight frame and panels that look much like polystyrene. Much less gubbins to see and much less work. They'll also have an element of ventilation as the panels float, aren't fixed. There's nothing to rot anyway.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 18th Feb 17, 12:25 PM
    • 4,666 Posts
    • 7,410 Thanks
    Silvertabby
    • #9
    • 18th Feb 17, 12:25 PM
    • #9
    • 18th Feb 17, 12:25 PM
    We have a tinted glass conservatory roof, and glare isn't a problem. Mind you. I suppose it depends on how much sun it gets - ours is east facing, if that helps.

    Our conservatory was about 16 years old when we asked for a quote to change the (dingy) polycarbonate roof for glass. That came out at 5K, which led us to thinking that was a bit much for an old conservatory, as a couple of the windows seals had gone, and the outer door was starting to discolour.

    That led to another quote to replace the windows and doors, which was less than the roof. After further discussions about the need (or not) for blinds, the quote was changed to a brick wall on one side of the conservatory and new windows and doors for the remainder. Well, you can see where this is going --- I liked the idea of the brick wall (we'd always kept the blinds down on that side anyway) but not the idea of 3 different brick lots. Took a deep breath, looked at Mr S, and asked for a quote for a complete new re-build using just the original foundations.

    That came out as a hybrid conservatory/orangery, and we love it. The final cost was 9K, being just 4K more than just the glass roof!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 18th Feb 17, 1:35 PM
    • 29,527 Posts
    • 102,361 Thanks
    Davesnave
    There is also the glass roof option but I don't want too much glare.
    I am totally confused and the loss of light in the adjoining room is a factor to consider if I were to opt for a solid roof.
    Does anyone have any advice/ suggestions? Thanks
    Originally posted by Mrsbarwocle
    If the room behind has no major windows other than those looking into the conservatory, you'll end up making it dreary if you opt for a solid roof.

    We had the benefit of having scaffolding up for a few months, so we were able to gauge the loss of light.

    We opted for a blue tinted roof and loads of ventilation.
    Opportunities may be missed, especially when they arrive disguised as hard work.

    • Mrsbarwocle
    • By Mrsbarwocle 18th Feb 17, 1:47 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Mrsbarwocle
    He said he would put insulation against the existing plastic roof and then add plasterboard and skim, he did a similar job for a friend who is very happy with it and charged around 1500 , so I was shocked at the amount he quoted but I guess he just didn't want the job, I don't think it's worth spending too much on a 10 year old roof, better to replace with something new, but just can't decide what is best?
    • cajef
    • By cajef 18th Feb 17, 3:00 PM
    • 5,055 Posts
    • 4,115 Thanks
    cajef
    We replaced the polycarbonate roof on our north facing 3.5 x 3 m conservatory twelve months ago by the company that installed it for us, we had an argon filled blue tinted glass roof installed for 1800, only wish we had one originally, as it is a bungalow we still get the sun partially of the roof, made the interior room brighter and the self cleaning glass really appears to work although you still need to clean the UPVC occasionally.
    Last edited by cajef; 19-02-2017 at 3:50 PM.
    I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 18th Feb 17, 4:42 PM
    • 2,917 Posts
    • 3,268 Thanks
    glasgowdan
    I'm talking about a suspended ceiling, like in offices. Lightweight frame and panels that look much like polystyrene. Much less gubbins to see and much less work. They'll also have an element of ventilation as the panels float, aren't fixed. There's nothing to rot anyway.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    Interesting. I'll have a look into it.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 19th Feb 17, 6:33 AM
    • 4,450 Posts
    • 2,889 Thanks
    Furts
    Why replace the roof? The money saving mse approach would be;

    1) If it is dirty then clean it. Cost, say 50

    2) If it is leaking then repair it. Cost, say 150

    3) If it is worn out then ample new sheets would cost 100 at B&Q


    Why pay thousands to tart up an old small conservatory? It is OK thinking about self cleaning glass, but unless the pitch meets the minimum requirement and the orientation and shading are suitable then the self cleaning will not work.

    Also consider the weight, the strength, the insulation, the ventilation and Buildings Regulations if a solid roof is fitted onto the existing conservatory. All round this is a route to a potential disaster. Why pay thousands to take on all these potential risks?
    • bouncydog1
    • By bouncydog1 19th Feb 17, 1:19 PM
    • 2,616 Posts
    • 2,079 Thanks
    bouncydog1
    We've replace our conservatory roof with a new glass one. Its blue tinted and has argon gas between the panes to help with insulation. We've also put in underfloor heating which has hardly come on. The conservatory has been a constant 20-21 degrees so far this winter which is the best we've ever had it. On sunny days the glare is much reduced. We're going to replace all of the windows next which should make it even more thermally efficient.
    • Peter Crew
    • By Peter Crew 19th Feb 17, 1:26 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Peter Crew
    If you are going to do anything to your conservatory roof there is a simple way to check you are getting it done correctly and with a product that WILL COMPLY WITH BUILDING REGULATIONS. Simply go to the Local Authority Building Control website (LABC) and click on the "search" button. Type in the Keywords "conservatory roof". This will provide you with a list of Certificated Manufacturers recognised by LABC and the current GUIDLINES AND PITFALLS. In brief it will warn you that only a factory manufactured roof system that already carries their LABC approval certification is likely to pass Building Regulations. It warns you to be wary of on site manufactured builds and particularly "CLAD OVERS" using the existing structure which will become "Overstressed" by the additional weight. LABC list recognised and certificated systems. You would be simply nuts to have a non certified roof installed !
    • Furts
    • By Furts 19th Feb 17, 4:27 PM
    • 4,450 Posts
    • 2,889 Thanks
    Furts
    If you are going to do anything to your conservatory roof there is a simple way to check you are getting it done correctly and with a product that WILL COMPLY WITH BUILDING REGULATIONS. Simply go to the Local Authority Building Control website (LABC) and click on the "search" button. Type in the Keywords "conservatory roof". This will provide you with a list of Certificated Manufacturers recognised by LABC and the current GUIDLINES AND PITFALLS. In brief it will warn you that only a factory manufactured roof system that already carries their LABC approval certification is likely to pass Building Regulations. It warns you to be wary of on site manufactured builds and particularly "CLAD OVERS" using the existing structure which will become "Overstressed" by the additional weight. LABC list recognised and certificated systems. You would be simply nuts to have a non certified roof installed !
    Originally posted by Peter Crew
    This is only a partial answer and does not state reality. If an Approved roof is fitted one has to check and inspect the installers to ensure bad work is not occurring.

    A neighbour has recently had an Approved roof fitted, There have been endless problems with the ceiling falling in, the lights falling out, crack appearing...after weeks of remedial works hopefully matters are now OK.

    The moral is to treat all such roofs as dubious and go into matters with your eyes wide open.
    • Polly2639
    • By Polly2639 25th Jul 17, 5:24 AM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Polly2639
    Hi Silvertabby

    I found what you have posted very interesting as I am in a similar position. Would you be prepared to let me know the name of the company you used as they seem competitive.

    Many thanks
    • Polly2639
    • By Polly2639 25th Jul 17, 5:31 AM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Polly2639
    We have a tinted glass conservatory roof, and glare isn't a problem. Mind you. I suppose it depends on how much sun it gets - ours is east facing, if that helps.

    Our conservatory was about 16 years old when we asked for a quote to change the (dingy) polycarbonate roof for glass. That came out at 5K, which led us to thinking that was a bit much for an old conservatory, as a couple of the windows seals had gone, and the outer door was starting to discolour.

    That led to another quote to replace the windows and doors, which was less than the roof. After further discussions about the need (or not) for blinds, the quote was changed to a brick wall on one side of the conservatory and new windows and doors for the remainder. Well, you can see where this is going --- I liked the idea of the brick wall (we'd always kept the blinds down on that side anyway) but not the idea of 3 different brick lots. Took a deep breath, looked at Mr S, and asked for a quote for a complete new re-build using just the original foundations.

    That came out as a hybrid conservatory/orangery, and we love it. The final cost was 9K, being just 4K more than just the glass roof!
    Originally posted by Silvertabby
    Hi Silvertabby

    I found what you have posted very interesting as I am in a similar position. Would you be prepared to let me know the name of the company you used as they seem competitive.

    Many thanks
    • tibs2647
    • By tibs2647 6th May 18, 7:38 AM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    tibs2647
    conservatory roof
    if you intend to sit in your conservatory in the summer or winter a solid roof option would be a better choice it becomes a garden room that can be used all year round.There many company's
    out there but not many who self support their roofs. There are some who just under cloak the original conservatory roof structure with insulation and plaster board then skim this presents a problem with glass or poly as this creates high temperatures between the insulation and poly or glass eventually causing distortion and break down of the above cheap to start but costly in the long run. As for the light issues strategically placed roof lights will solve that problem. Besides that you will be siting in your new space a lot more often so the light will be all around you.
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