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Replacement conservatory roof advice please

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Mrsbarwocle_2Mrsbarwocle_2 Forumite
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I am planning to replace my existing 3x2 m polycarbonate conservatory roof built approx 10 years ago and cannot decide which type of roof to choose.
I've had a quote for a Guardian roof from a trusted local installer for £6400 which includes internal plastering and replacement guttering.A friend also recommended a local builder who would insulate the existing roof, plasterboard and skim, he quoted £3500 which I thought was a bit steep
I have also seen adverts for Thermolite panels which replace the existing polycarbonate. There is also the glass roof option but I don't want too much glare.
I am totally confused and the loss of light in the adjoining room is a factor to consider if I were to opt for a solid roof.
Does anyone have any advice/ suggestions? Thanks
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Replies

  • What does 'insulate the existing roof' actually mean? Is he going to stick boards up against the plastic? Build a timber framework to fix the new ceiling to?
  • DoozergirlDoozergirl Forumite
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    A real roof on a proper extension wouldn't cost £6400. It probably wouldn't cost £3500 either.

    I have a builder friend who had someone fit a
    suspended ceiling like you find in offices. They stiffed the area above with insulation. It cost less than £1000 for two conservatories and, to me, seems in line with what one should spend on a structure that is not permanent.
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  • But that leaves you with a void between polycarb roof and the outside of some foil lined boards? Not sure, I can't picture it.
  • DoozergirlDoozergirl Forumite
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    I'm not sure what the problem with a void is.

    You cannot see anything from outside. I presumed they put rockwool in for less weight on the ceiling and ease.
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  • SplanKSplanK Forumite
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    Doozergirl wrote: »
    I'm not sure what the problem with a void is.

    You cannot see anything from outside..



    Maybe trying to point out ventilation of the void??
  • It would just look pretty ugly. I can see my conservatory roof from the garden. Just wondered if there was some liner that you out up close to the roof over a flat plaster ceiling.

    Also, would typical conservatory framework support the weight of a timber ceiling framework plus boards plus plaster?
  • DoozergirlDoozergirl Forumite
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    glasgowdan wrote: »
    It would just look pretty ugly. I can see my conservatory roof from the garden. Just wondered if there was some liner that you out up close to the roof over a flat plaster ceiling.

    Also, would typical conservatory framework support the weight of a timber ceiling framework plus boards plus plaster?

    I'm talking about a suspended ceiling, like in offices. Lightweight frame and panels that look much like polystyrene. Much less gubbins to see and much less work. They'll also have an element of ventilation as the panels float, aren't fixed. There's nothing to rot anyway.
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  • SilvertabbySilvertabby Forumite
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    We have a tinted glass conservatory roof, and glare isn't a problem. Mind you. I suppose it depends on how much sun it gets - ours is east facing, if that helps.

    Our conservatory was about 16 years old when we asked for a quote to change the (dingy) polycarbonate roof for glass. That came out at £5K, which led us to thinking that was a bit much for an old conservatory, as a couple of the windows seals had gone, and the outer door was starting to discolour.

    That led to another quote to replace the windows and doors, which was less than the roof. After further discussions about the need (or not) for blinds, the quote was changed to a brick wall on one side of the conservatory and new windows and doors for the remainder. Well, you can see where this is going --- I liked the idea of the brick wall (we'd always kept the blinds down on that side anyway) but not the idea of 3 different brick lots. Took a deep breath, looked at Mr S, and asked for a quote for a complete new re-build using just the original foundations.

    That came out as a hybrid conservatory/orangery, and we love it. The final cost was £9K, being just £4K more than just the glass roof!
  • DavesnaveDavesnave Forumite
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    There is also the glass roof option but I don't want too much glare.
    I am totally confused and the loss of light in the adjoining room is a factor to consider if I were to opt for a solid roof.
    Does anyone have any advice/ suggestions? Thanks
    If the room behind has no major windows other than those looking into the conservatory, you'll end up making it dreary if you opt for a solid roof.

    We had the benefit of having scaffolding up for a few months, so we were able to gauge the loss of light.

    We opted for a blue tinted roof and loads of ventilation.
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  • He said he would put insulation against the existing plastic roof and then add plasterboard and skim, he did a similar job for a friend who is very happy with it and charged around £1500 , so I was shocked at the amount he quoted but I guess he just didn't want the job, I don't think it's worth spending too much on a 10 year old roof, better to replace with something new, but just can't decide what is best?
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