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    • ajm410
    • By ajm410 12th Dec 16, 11:09 AM
    • 136Posts
    • 32Thanks
    ajm410
    House selling - gas and electrical safety certificate requested
    • #1
    • 12th Dec 16, 11:09 AM
    House selling - gas and electrical safety certificate requested 12th Dec 16 at 11:09 AM
    Hi all,

    I'm trying to sell my late mum's 50-60-year-old house and wondering if you can help me, as I'm completely new to this process...?

    I accepted an offer about 8 weeks ago for the property which was 3k (just under 3%) below the asking price.

    However, despite that, the buyer has so far not instructed their solicitor to proceed due to some (questionable) confusion about not receiving packs from their solicitor etc.

    Anyway, they have had a homebuyer's survey done, which has flagged a few issues with regard to the gas and electrics, and they are now asking that I get a gas and electrical safety certificate before they proceed further, which I've been quoted will cost 180 +VAT.

    From doing a bit of research, I understand that I'm not required to provide this and I guess my question is what should I do about their request?

    On the one hand, I'm quite keen to get the house sold quickly. However, I don't want the certificate to throw up a load of issues that the buyers then expect me to resolve - especially when we accepted below the asking price. They are first-time buyers and I think this is what they may be expecting.

    (In addition, I worry that the agent is pushing me to get this done just to speed up the process,as they haven't told me I'm not legally required to get one.)

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!
Page 1
    • Alter ego
    • By Alter ego 12th Dec 16, 11:12 AM
    • 2,420 Posts
    • 2,392 Thanks
    Alter ego
    • #2
    • 12th Dec 16, 11:12 AM
    • #2
    • 12th Dec 16, 11:12 AM
    As they are ftb I guess they think rental requirements apply to private houses. I'd be telling them they do not.
    Ignore me if you like, it's not the real me anyway.
    • martinthebandit
    • By martinthebandit 12th Dec 16, 11:12 AM
    • 3,561 Posts
    • 6,101 Thanks
    martinthebandit
    • #3
    • 12th Dec 16, 11:12 AM
    • #3
    • 12th Dec 16, 11:12 AM
    Tell them no and tell your estate agent to put it back on the market until contracts are exchanged.
    Politics -
    from the words Poli, meaning many
    and tics meaning blood sucking parasites


    (thanks to Kinky Friedman (or Larry Hardman) for the quote}
    • Person_one
    • By Person_one 12th Dec 16, 11:14 AM
    • 26,968 Posts
    • 92,392 Thanks
    Person_one
    • #4
    • 12th Dec 16, 11:14 AM
    • #4
    • 12th Dec 16, 11:14 AM
    The survey will have had a standard line in it that the gas and electrics do not meet current standards and that the buyers should arrange their own checks. Are they first time buyers who have taken this literally?

    I'd respond that everything is currently working but obviously is not brand new and that you won't be paying for the checks. If you want to you could say that you are happy to allow access if they choose to pay for them.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 12th Dec 16, 11:16 AM
    • 44,992 Posts
    • 53,621 Thanks
    G_M
    • #5
    • 12th Dec 16, 11:16 AM
    • #5
    • 12th Dec 16, 11:16 AM
    Tell them you are happy to permit access by their gas and elecrical contractors to undertake inspections, just as you did with their surveyor.

    You do not have to provide the certificates yourself. If they are concerned about the electrics they should get them inspected.

    Meanwhile instruct your EA to start re-marketing the property?
    Last edited by G_M; 12-12-2016 at 11:43 AM.
    • Rain Shadow
    • By Rain Shadow 12th Dec 16, 11:23 AM
    • 1,672 Posts
    • 3,046 Thanks
    Rain Shadow
    • #6
    • 12th Dec 16, 11:23 AM
    • #6
    • 12th Dec 16, 11:23 AM
    Be prepared for your buyers to be spooked when the gas and electrical reports state that neither meets current regulations for a dozen different reasons.
    You can pick your friends and you can pick your nose but you can't pick your friend's nose.
    • marksoton
    • By marksoton 12th Dec 16, 11:44 AM
    • 16,507 Posts
    • 36,523 Thanks
    marksoton
    • #7
    • 12th Dec 16, 11:44 AM
    • #7
    • 12th Dec 16, 11:44 AM

    On the one hand, I'm quite keen to get the house sold quickly.
    Originally posted by ajm410
    Then i suggest you put it back on the market. They've already wasted 2 months of your time.
    • ajm410
    • By ajm410 12th Dec 16, 12:51 PM
    • 136 Posts
    • 32 Thanks
    ajm410
    • #8
    • 12th Dec 16, 12:51 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Dec 16, 12:51 PM
    Thanks all, this is very helpful.

    I'll let you know how I get on...

    Thanks again!!!
    • sheff6107
    • By sheff6107 12th Dec 16, 1:22 PM
    • 445 Posts
    • 293 Thanks
    sheff6107
    • #9
    • 12th Dec 16, 1:22 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Dec 16, 1:22 PM
    Be prepared for your buyers to be spooked when the gas and electrical reports state that neither meets current regulations for a dozen different reasons.
    Originally posted by Rain Shadow
    Exactly. Sometimes best to get it done so you know where you stand. It's easier to sell a car with a 12 month MOT instead of none.
    • Alter ego
    • By Alter ego 12th Dec 16, 1:27 PM
    • 2,420 Posts
    • 2,392 Thanks
    Alter ego
    Exactly. Sometimes best to get it done so you know where you stand. It's easier to sell a car with a 12 month MOT instead of none.
    Originally posted by sheff6107
    Yes but an MOT is transferrable. Surveys etc are not.
    Ignore me if you like, it's not the real me anyway.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 12th Dec 16, 5:19 PM
    • 4,719 Posts
    • 6,930 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    If all else fails put the property into a property auction.
    • csgohan4
    • By csgohan4 12th Dec 16, 6:19 PM
    • 4,763 Posts
    • 3,000 Thanks
    csgohan4
    who knows what else the buyer will want you to pay for? New carpet? blinds? Bogroll?
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land/Estate Agents"
    • Marktheshark
    • By Marktheshark 12th Dec 16, 6:21 PM
    • 5,692 Posts
    • 7,184 Thanks
    Marktheshark
    You tell the agent to keep the for sale sign up and to keep taking other offers.
    The house is FOR SALE, like anything else for sale and stays for sale until they pay for it.
    Brexit will become whatever they invent it to be.
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 12th Dec 16, 6:33 PM
    • 4,244 Posts
    • 8,906 Thanks
    DaftyDuck
    I agree with most, saying consider remarketing and let them pay if they want the survey done.

    However, under the circumstances, it isn't that unreasonable a request, as the previous owner is sadly deceased. Therefore, there's nobody to casually ask condition and the like.

    Problem is, as you are aware, any such survey WILL throw issues up, and a ftb may well over worry over the issues.
    • glasgowdan
    • By glasgowdan 12th Dec 16, 7:11 PM
    • 2,905 Posts
    • 3,259 Thanks
    glasgowdan
    I agree with most, saying consider remarketing and let them pay if they want the survey done.

    However, under the circumstances, it isn't that unreasonable a request, as the previous owner is sadly deceased. Therefore, there's nobody to casually ask condition and the like.
    Originally posted by DaftyDuck
    This is where you offer another viewing. Buyers are welcome to check things work, fire up the heating, turn lights on and off, go around wall sockets with a hairdryer and check they all work.

    What happens in the likely scenario where you pay 200 for these meaningless extra checks and the buyers still change their minds last minute. You're not only down on time and other money, you'll be down another 200 too.

    They can arrange their own, though I'd be looking to get a communication to them that this is not a new build property, sold as seen, end of.
    • ajm410
    • By ajm410 13th Dec 16, 10:42 AM
    • 136 Posts
    • 32 Thanks
    ajm410
    Hi everyone - thanks very much for all your advice.

    To update you as promised... I went back to my estate agent and said "no"; however, I offered them access to get their own certificates done - but said I would not budge on price either way. I also told my estate agent to inform them that I would be putting the property back on the market immediately.

    Lo and behold the buyer has now said they still want to proceed, will get their own certificates done, and has promised to instruct their solicitor this morning. I called my estate agent, who said it appears they finally get the message.

    Fingers crossed this actually moves quickly now.

    Thanks very much once again!
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 8th Mar 18, 12:21 PM
    • 3,623 Posts
    • 6,808 Thanks
    Smodlet
    It is not the seller's responsibility to provide anything other than an EPC unless they are in Scotland. This was tried in England several years ago and did not take off. If buyers want these surveys/checks done, it is for them to arrange and pay for.

    BTW, I have reported your post as advertising.
    Last edited by Smodlet; 08-03-2018 at 12:23 PM.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • tonytee
    • By tonytee 14th Mar 18, 1:24 PM
    • 147 Posts
    • 51 Thanks
    tonytee
    For the sake of a few hundred pounds why would you hold up the sale or purchase of the property
    Originally posted by DaftyDuck
    Exactly this.

    Personally, I have bought and sold a property on more than 20 occasions now and I would always get a gas and electrical check done.

    There's a company I use. They do both checks in one go for buyers and sellers. They work for estate agents as well.

    Here's what's covered:
    • full boiler safety check including the inside of the boiler
    • full flue gas analysis and readings
    • a check of heating controls for function and reliability
    • a check of the hot water cylinder for function and reliability
    • a full electrical installation condition report
    • a check for any broken sockets
    • a full check of the wiring
    • a full check of the fuse board
    • advice on all the above in regards to safety, condition and future reliability

    Also if you click the link below it is 175 for both checks, not 200 -

    https://www.gassafetycertificate.info/home-buyers-survey-house-survey-buying-house-gas-boiler-electrical-safety-checking-certificates/


    I hope this helps someone!

    Tony.
    Last edited by tonytee; 16-08-2018 at 11:18 AM.
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 14th Mar 18, 2:31 PM
    • 3,623 Posts
    • 6,808 Thanks
    Smodlet
    Yet your post has been removed...
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
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