insulation advice needed for office, Thanks

Please see picture attached below:
The office was garage converted, it is cold then the other room, I realized the wall(green colour in the picture) was not insulated, It looks pretty simple job, my question: do I need need extra layer or work before I put the insulation board on this green wall? as this insulation is inside of the garage, I guess it should not much damp, as the garage is not as cold/wet as outdoor,  am I right? 
is this kind of board ok: links from wicks
Many thanks



«1

Comments

  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Posts: 4,458
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    At 100mm thick, that insulation board you linked to should transform your office. What's on the office/garage floor, and the ceiling? These are important too, of course.
    Since that wall is effectively internal - even tho' one side is a garage - then, as you say, there should be no damp issues. I would simply bond these sheets directly to the wall, using a powerful adhesive such as Stixall, or a spray foam construction adhesive. Run a solid bead along the bottom in order to seal the insulation to the wall, and not inadvertently leave a tiny air venting gap up between them.
    Foil-tape the boards together.
    I suspect the insulation will be more immediately effective if fitted to the office wall side - ie, the room should heat up very quickly after the heating is turned on - but won't have the 'store' value of the block wall after the heating is turned off.
    What are folk's thoughts on this?
  • cherry2017
    cherry2017 Posts: 168
    First Anniversary First Post Photogenic
    Forumite
    At 100mm thick, that insulation board you linked to should transform your office. What's on the office/garage floor, and the ceiling? These are important too, of course.
    Since that wall is effectively internal - even tho' one side is a garage - then, as you say, there should be no damp issues. I would simply bond these sheets directly to the wall, using a powerful adhesive such as Stixall, or a spray foam construction adhesive. Run a solid bead along the bottom in order to seal the insulation to the wall, and not inadvertently leave a tiny air venting gap up between them.
    Foil-tape the boards together.
    I suspect the insulation will be more immediately effective if fitted to the office wall side - ie, the room should heat up very quickly after the heating is turned on - but won't have the 'store' value of the block wall after the heating is turned off.
    What are folk's thoughts on this?
    Many thanks, recently the radiator is not working in this office room, Upstairs is bedroom, the office flooring is about 10cm higher than the garage, I guess it is insulated?
    I bit doubt this green 4 meters wall causing cold temperatures for the office, but the rest looks ok, the windows of office are new wooden double glazing, 
    If I don't glue the insulation board to the wall, what's the difference? Thanks for your professional advice, foil tape the board is good idea.

  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Posts: 4,458
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    If I don't glue the insulation board to the wall, what's the difference? Thanks for your professional advice, foil tape the board is good idea.
    I don't understand.
    The boards need to be secured by some method, and I'm suggesting that the easiest would be to 'glue' it in place :smile:
    Any other method would likely be more complex. Or, you could drill through the boards and into the wall and use mechanical fasteners, and that would be a good & quick alternative - I understand fixings are available for just this, essentially tapped into place with a hammer. https://tradefixdirect.com/c/nails-screws-fixings/fixings-fastenings/insulation-fixings/


  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,253
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper Photogenic
    Forumite
    ThisIsWeird said: The boards need to be secured by some method, and I'm suggesting that the easiest would be to 'glue' it in place :smile:
    Any other method would likely be more complex. Or, you could drill through the boards and into the wall and use mechanical fasteners, and that would be a good & quick alternative - I understand fixings are available for just this, essentially tapped into place with a hammer. https://tradefixdirect.com/c/nails-screws-fixings/fixings-fastenings/insulation-fixings/
    Even with adhesive, you should be using mechanical fixings. As this wall is internal, I'm assuming it is going to be plastered. In which case, any fixings need to go through both the plasterboard and insulation.
    I prefer using the "warm batten" method - This involves fixing 2x1 battens to the wall vertically at 600mm intervals with good strong screws. Fill the space between the battens with 25mm Celotex, using expanding foam to fill any gaps, and then tape the joints with aluminium tape. Cover the whole wall with more Celotex, again, foam & taping the joints. Fix horizontal battens (400-600mm centres), and use screws through the whole lot in to the vertical battens. Another layer of Celotex between the battens (more foam & tape), and finish off with plasterboard. Yes, quite a bit more work, but it avoids the cold bridging that long hammer fixings might give.

    Here is the last wall I did - Only had space for 65mm of insulation, so fixed a layer of 40mm Kingspan to the wall, and used hammer fixings to secure the 2x1 battens. The hammer fixings are countersunk in to the battens with stainless steel washers to spread the load.


    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
  • cherry2017
    cherry2017 Posts: 168
    First Anniversary First Post Photogenic
    Forumite
    FreeBear said:
    ThisIsWeird said: The boards need to be secured by some method, and I'm suggesting that the easiest would be to 'glue' it in place :smile:
    Any other method would likely be more complex. Or, you could drill through the boards and into the wall and use mechanical fasteners, and that would be a good & quick alternative - I understand fixings are available for just this, essentially tapped into place with a hammer. https://tradefixdirect.com/c/nails-screws-fixings/fixings-fastenings/insulation-fixings/
    Even with adhesive, you should be using mechanical fixings. As this wall is internal, I'm assuming it is going to be plastered. In which case, any fixings need to go through both the plasterboard and insulation.
    I prefer using the "warm batten" method - This involves fixing 2x1 battens to the wall vertically at 600mm intervals with good strong screws. Fill the space between the battens with 25mm Celotex, using expanding foam to fill any gaps, and then tape the joints with aluminium tape. Cover the whole wall with more Celotex, again, foam & taping the joints. Fix horizontal battens (400-600mm centres), and use screws through the whole lot in to the vertical battens. Another layer of Celotex between the battens (more foam & tape), and finish off with plasterboard. Yes, quite a bit more work, but it avoids the cold bridging that long hammer fixings might give.

    Here is the last wall I did - Only had space for 65mm of insulation, so fixed a layer of 40mm Kingspan to the wall, and used hammer fixings to secure the 2x1 battens. The hammer fixings are countersunk in to the battens with stainless steel washers to spread the load.

    I'm so grateful for your professional advice, I will read the details when I'm starting the plan
  • cherry2017
    cherry2017 Posts: 168
    First Anniversary First Post Photogenic
    Forumite
    If I don't glue the insulation board to the wall, what's the difference? Thanks for your professional advice, foil tape the board is good idea.
    I don't understand.
    The boards need to be secured by some method, and I'm suggesting that the easiest would be to 'glue' it in place :smile:
    Any other method would likely be more complex. Or, you could drill through the boards and into the wall and use mechanical fasteners, and that would be a good & quick alternative - I understand fixings are available for just this, essentially tapped into place with a hammer. https://tradefixdirect.com/c/nails-screws-fixings/fixings-fastenings/insulation-fixings/


    Brilliant, thanks a lot for your advice 
  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Posts: 4,458
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    If you fit the insulation on the garage side, and if you are happy with a metallic wall, then any fixing method is fine. And you can paint it in any case.
    If on the office side, or if you want a perfect finish, then you are best to use insulated plasterboard, which will do both jobs for you - insulate & board. In this case, I'd recommend adhesive as it'll fix the boards solidly with no subsequent movement, and add a few mechs too as it's recommended as the boards could fall off in the event of a fire - the insulation will melt.
    If you wish to batten out first - another method - by all means do so, but a lot more work. 
    100mm is a lot, and you'd get excellent results with 75mm if space is precious.
  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Posts: 4,458
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    Your raised floor will hopefully suggest it's insulated, but no guarantee. What material is used? Possible to lift or cut a small test hole?
    In any effect, the floor is less important, as far less heat travels that way, and even a small sealed void there will be 'insulating'. Try and check, tho'.
    If it feels 'stone cold', you can always add insulated underlay to the top.
    Ceiling - what's on there? That's a Biggie.
  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,253
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper Photogenic
    Forumite
    ThisIsWeird said: If you fit the insulation on the garage side, and if you are happy with a metallic wall, then any fixing method is fine.
    In a garage where a vehicle might be parked, it is best to avoid materials that will burn easily - Yes, I know few garages actually have cars parked in them, but the risk should not be ignored.
    If I ever fit EWI inside my garage, it will be cork with a rendered finish (garage is stuck on the side of the house).

    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
  • cherry2017
    cherry2017 Posts: 168
    First Anniversary First Post Photogenic
    Forumite
    If you fit the insulation on the garage side, and if you are happy with a metallic wall, then any fixing method is fine. And you can paint it in any case.
    If on the office side, or if you want a perfect finish, then you are best to use insulated plasterboard, which will do both jobs for you - insulate & board. In this case, I'd recommend adhesive as it'll fix the boards solidly with no subsequent movement, and add a few mechs too as it's recommended as the boards could fall off in the event of a fire - the insulation will melt.
    If you wish to batten out first - another method - by all means do so, but a lot more work. 
    100mm is a lot, and you'd get excellent results with 75mm if space is precious.
    I will insulate in garage side and no batten, thanks for 75mm advice, it can save money and space. :)
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 341.7K Banking & Borrowing
  • 249.7K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 449.1K Spending & Discounts
  • 233.9K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 606K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 172.5K Life & Family
  • 246.8K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.8K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards