Using Tongue and Groove to overboard Ceiling

What are the pros and cons of using tongue and groove instead of plasterboard to cover a damaged lime plaster ceiling in a Victorian cottage?

Thanks in advance
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  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,229
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    Aside from the aesthetics, T&Q panelling went out of fashion back in the 1970s.
    Taking down a lath & plaster ceiling, whilst a very dirty and messy job, doesn't require any skill. Once down, and all nails have been removed, putting up plasterboard will give you a nice flat ceiling. Also, with the price of timber at the moment, it could well cost a lot more. Done some of the ceilings here, and still have four more to do at some point.
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  • TELLIT01
    TELLIT01 Posts: 16,232
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    I can't see any pro's to using T&G boarding.  Plasterboard will be faster, easier and almost certainly cheaper.  If/when you ever wish to sell the property I suspect many would be put off by T&G.
  • Emmia
    Emmia Posts: 2,927
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    edited 9 January at 10:05PM
    T&G on the ceiling might work in a sauna, where it's all wood or T&G.

    Otherwise I'd steer well clear, even if only on a stylistic basis.
  • secla
    secla Posts: 291
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    plenty of people overboard with plasterboard as well to avoid the mess of ripping ceilings down, not saying its the best option but its going to be 100 times better than a tongue and groove boarded ceiling
  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,229
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    edited 10 January at 12:46AM
    secla said:
    plenty of people overboard with plasterboard as well to avoid the mess of ripping ceilings down, not saying its the best option but
    I'll stick my neck out and say ripping the old ceiling down is the best option. Overboarding is a bit of a crap shoot trying to screw the plasterboard to the (hidden) joists. It also adds extra weight to the ceiling.
    When I did my lounge (roughly 4m by 4m), I filled two bulk bags with plaster - Estimate about a tonne. The joists are now having an easier life. It also gives you the opportunity to route new cables for lighting & sockets and perhaps tidy up any dodgy plumbing that might be uncovered. Oh, and if this ceiling is the top floor, an ideal time to stuff more insulation between the joists and kill that cold spot under the eaves.

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  • TELLIT01
    TELLIT01 Posts: 16,232
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    Ripping down the old ceiling is certainly the best route to go if the property isn't occupied.  Doing it in a property which is occupied is a different matter altogether.  Putting up new plasterboard can be messy, but nothing compared to the dust and other carp which will come down with the old ceiling.
  • Niv
    Niv Posts: 2,457
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    I had to have a number (three in total I think) ceiling pulled down while occupying my house (as they were in a bad way - with one of them the builder removed the wallpaper from the edges of the ceiling and the ceiling fell down...), the mess in the room in question was bad but the overall house mess wasn't too bad in the grand scheme of things.
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  • stuart45
    stuart45 Posts: 3,799
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    You can keep the dust down to a minimum by using masking tape round the door. Open the windows, have a hose with a mister spray, damp down the rubble and bag it. Hoover as much dust as possible before opening up the door.
  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,229
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    stuart45 said:
    You can keep the dust down to a minimum by using masking tape round the door. Open the windows, have a hose with a mister spray, damp down the rubble and bag it. Hoover as much dust as possible before opening up the door.
    Misting the air certainly makes a huge difference in helping to keep the dust down. I just use a spray bottle rather than a hose. Also misting the air before and whilst sweeping up helps to keep the dust in check.
    Still a very, very dirty job, so disposable overalls and a decent quality P3 dust mask is essential.

    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
  • twopenny
    twopenny Posts: 5,290
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    Tongue and grove was weird in the 70s.
    Even weirder in a lovely old cottage 50yrs later.
    Very difficult to clean and cobwebs love it.
    There's a reason that short lived fashion was never revived.

    But I am curious. Why do you think of doing that? 
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