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New build flat, the roof is sagging

snowqueen555
snowqueen555 Posts: 1,519
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edited 4 January at 12:24AM in House buying, renting & selling
Hi, I'm currently buying a new build flat, mortgage application is going through and paid the conveyancer for searches. The property has a professional consultant certificate and not a structural warranty. Anyway, I noticed the flat has a sag in the roof which is ridiculous because it's a new roof just put on this year. The developer has said a bit of sag is fine, this will be signed off by building control and the architects certificate.

Basically should I walk away from this because there is no structural warranty so the leaseholders would be liable for repairs. As it's a flat there would be collective buildings insurance however their coverage may not cover a roof replacement. This is a bit of a pain as I've been searching for 18 months now, to pull out again and lose money is a kick in the teeth but I feel like the right decision? As I've paid I may as well wait until I get all the paperwork to look at, and then question building control and the architect about roof and see what responses I get back. I have posted on other websites, the general consensus is to walk away.

It's the middle roof by the way, I would be in the 1st floor and there is a loft flat above me.

https://imgur.com/5hFgANe
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Comments

  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,267
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    A sagging roof line on an old building is called character - As long as it is structurally sound, it should be fine.
    I'd be more concerned with what the ground floor will be used for - Looks like a prime spot for commercial use such as a fast food joint. Quite likely that all three ground floor units are earmarked for commercial use - This could seriously impact on the value of your flat and limit the number of potential buyers when you come to sell.
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  • Emmia
    Emmia Posts: 2,962
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    I have to agree, the likelihood of the ground floor being non-residential and currently empty so unknown in terms of occupiers, (do you want to live over a noisy, smelly open all hours takeaway?) would put me off, along with the roof sag.

    Ultimately, you'll at some point be selling what you buy, I'd avoid anything that may have issues making it difficult to resell.
  • eddddy
    eddddy Posts: 16,143
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     As it's a flat there would be collective buildings insurance however their coverage may not cover a roof replacement. 

    Just to clarify... Buildings insurance typically covers loss or damage caused by events specified in the policy like:
    • fire, explosion, storms, floods, earthquakes
    • theft, attempted theft and vandalism
    • frozen and burst pipes
    • fallen trees, lampposts, aerials or satellite dishes
    • subsidence
    • vehicle or aircraft collisions

    So if the roof was damaged by any of those things once you have insurance is in place, it should be repaired (or replaced, if necessary) by the insurers.

    It's unlikely that the sagging was caused by any of those, and in any case the sagging has already occurred.  You can't take out insurance to cover something that has already occurred.



    And generally, if the roof needs repairing or replacing due to things like
    • age
    • wear and tear
    • gradual damage (e.g. rot or woodworm)
    • poor workmanship
    • poor materials
    ... none of those things are generally covered by buildings insurance policies.



  • bobster2
    bobster2 Posts: 444
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    FreeBear said:
    A sagging roof line on an old building is called character - As long as it is structurally sound, it should be fine.

    Indeed. But this looks like it could be an entirely new roof (as part of a loft conversion) stuck on top of an old building. 
    So I wonder why middle one is sagging but similar new roof to the right is not sagging?

    Wouldn't it be normal to replace the roof timbers as part of loft conversions like these?
  • snowqueen555
    snowqueen555 Posts: 1,519
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    edited 4 January at 10:07AM
    The roof sag has occurred after the new roof was installed (I looked on google streetview history), and notice it is only one of the roofs and not the other two which were all done together. I have posted this on some diy forums, the consensus is that the loft conversions was done shoddily or calculations are not correct. Either way a new roof shouldn't be sagging. The structure wasn't completely replaced, but reinforced and certain beams were replaced

    The bottom will be made into flats so its all been turned to residential.

    Okay so sounds like any future problems with the roof would be footed by the leaseholder, with no warranty and the fact that buildings insurance doesn't cover it. 

    I could pay for a roof survey to be done, the issue with that is I have never found a new build developer who would allow surveyors in before sale.
  • bobster2
    bobster2 Posts: 444
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    The roof sag has occurred after the new roof was installed (I looked on google streetview history), and notice it is only one of the roofs and not the other two which were all done together. I have posted this on some diy forums, the consensus is that the loft conversions was done shoddily or calculations are not correct. Either way a new roof shouldn't be sagging. The structure wasn't completely replaced, but reinforced and certain beams were replaced

    The bottom will be made into flats so its all been turned to residential.

    Okay so sounds like any future problems with the roof would be footed by the leaseholder, with no warranty and the fact that buildings insurance doesn't cover it. 

    I could pay for a roof survey to be done, the issue with that is I have never found a new build developer who would allow surveyors in before sale.
    It's not really "new build" is it - it's a renovation/conversion.
    If the developer will not permit you to have your own fully independent roof survey carried out - I would walk away.
  • gwynlas
    gwynlas Posts: 1,622
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    As there is such  noticeable sag I am amazed that the developer has not tried  to get it rectified already and I would certainly walk rather than accept this. if they are happy with  this issue then how can you be sure that they have not skimped on other areas in order to maximise their profits?
  • artyclarty
    artyclarty Posts: 214
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    I walked away from a terrace house with a similar looking problem.

    My specialist survey said that they have used the wrong type of tiles for the roof (originally slate so modern concrete ones were too heavy) without reinforcing the roof. In my case it would have required either the whole lot coming off and reinforcing or replacing the heavy concrete ones with something more suitable. Being that I'm in the north, the house only was up for sale for £60k so redoing a roof again would have cost farm more to do than it would have added in value. That made it an easy choice for me!
  • snowqueen555
    snowqueen555 Posts: 1,519
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    bobster2 said:
    The roof sag has occurred after the new roof was installed (I looked on google streetview history), and notice it is only one of the roofs and not the other two which were all done together. I have posted this on some diy forums, the consensus is that the loft conversions was done shoddily or calculations are not correct. Either way a new roof shouldn't be sagging. The structure wasn't completely replaced, but reinforced and certain beams were replaced

    The bottom will be made into flats so its all been turned to residential.

    Okay so sounds like any future problems with the roof would be footed by the leaseholder, with no warranty and the fact that buildings insurance doesn't cover it. 

    I could pay for a roof survey to be done, the issue with that is I have never found a new build developer who would allow surveyors in before sale.
    It's not really "new build" is it - it's a renovation/conversion.
    If the developer will not permit you to have your own fully independent roof survey carried out - I would walk away.
    It's not built from scratch, but renovations like this is classed as a new build by the seller and the bank as it has been gutted and rebuilt.

    Yeah I am thinking that too.
  • snowqueen555
    snowqueen555 Posts: 1,519
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    I walked away from a terrace house with a similar looking problem.

    My specialist survey said that they have used the wrong type of tiles for the roof (originally slate so modern concrete ones were too heavy) without reinforcing the roof. In my case it would have required either the whole lot coming off and reinforcing or replacing the heavy concrete ones with something more suitable. Being that I'm in the north, the house only was up for sale for £60k so redoing a roof again would have cost farm more to do than it would have added in value. That made it an easy choice for me!
    Yes this is what some of the other posts have said. They would need to completely redo the job again and they don't want to do that.
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