Thoughts on bike and firewood storage options

Emily_Joy
Emily_Joy Posts: 1,159
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It appears our existing garden shed is coming to the end of its life, so it is probably better to get a new one rather than fixing & relocating what we currently have, partially because it is just a bit small for the existing bike and you can't fit any wood in when the bike is there. There seem to be two alternatives:
1) use a nationwide company, e.g. waltons; or
2) use a local shed/garden buildings expert
I think we are looking for something like 8'x3' pent shed, that has two sections - one for the bike and another one for the firewood. We use the WW2 war shelter to store the main supply of the firewood, so there will be only a small amount there close to the house.
On the other hand, we are planning to add a porch anyway, so could keep a small amount of wood there, then we only need a bike storage.
Nationwide company is a bit cheaper, but it appears they quote without floor/base and request that you install the base first before they will put a shed up, then add wood preserver treatment etc. I don't quite see the point of that. The base is sort of important, as the garden is on a natural slope; and after putting up a proper base we can just as well put a shed up!
(1) combine or separate storage? 
(2) nationwide or local company?(3) when we come to sell in 5 years time, is it likely that the buyers request us to remove the shed? 
Any thoughts are very welcome.
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Comments

  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Posts: 4,458
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    8' x 3' - did I read that right?!
    (Tiny :smile: )
  • Albermarle
    Albermarle Posts: 21,062
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    In my very limited experience, pent sheds seem to be more leak prone than apex ones.
    Regarding the base, usually all you really have to 'supply' is a flat area, that is solid. Although a concrete base is recommended, they are only really necessary for a larger shed/workshop that will have heavy stuff inside.
    I used gravel as a base, as it easy and it levels out any dips and bumps in the ground. Then you need to buy the timbers that the shed will rest on.
    I think the shed companies also have some solutions using metal or plastic frames implanted in the ground.
    I had both recent sheds built by someone who knew what they doing, as it is not as easy as they make out. Then again I am not very good at DIY.
  • Emily_Joy
    Emily_Joy Posts: 1,159
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    8' x 3' - did I read that right?!  (Tiny :smile: )
    How big a bike shed should be?...

  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Posts: 4,458
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    In general, tho', a log store needs good ventilation - the draughtier the better. A bike store is similar - you want a damp muddy bike to dry out asap. So, a shed for these jobs should have good ventilation built in. 
    A porch should be ventilated in order to prevent condensation, but to a lesser extent - 'trickle' should do.
    Unseasoned timber will give out a lot of moisture, so you won't want it where this moisture can affect anything else, but I guess your bomb shelter (I have one too!) Does the majority of this?
    Can you confirm the dims? A 8x3 shed doesn't really need 'founds', and could be done with some sunken posts (ideally concrete) or even levelled blocks for the shed to sit on. The new owner would have no trouble disposing if it should they want to.
    If your new porch is large enough, then neatly stacked, well cut logs could look great in there, very country-cottage. Otherwise, tho', would you really want logs in there?
    As for where to get a shed, also consider metal and even plastic/composite. Having to maintain a timber shed can quickly become a pita.
    But, very little 'base' required. I'd be looking at a local handyperson who could do it all. Ask on local pages for recommendations, and chat with the results. Ask their thoughts - "Here's the space for the shed - what do you think? What base is best? What type of shed?" Q's and Q's - and come on here for clarification if needed.
  • Grenage
    Grenage Posts: 2,894
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    edited 1 January at 5:02PM
    Assuming your firewood is seasoned, anything with cover to keep the rain off will do.  I have a large open store for seasoning, and a small closed store by the front door for use.

    I'm assuming you buy seasoned logs if you're keeping them in a bunker.

    I'd opt for separate storage simply because it's a lot easier to stack logs in a confined space.

    I wouldn't store logs indoors unless they are kiln-dried (which are a waste of money).
  • Alderbank
    Alderbank Posts: 2,675
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    8' x 3' - did I read that right?!
    (Tiny :smile: )
    Lots of makers do bikesheds about 6'6"x2'6". That's ample for one (or two) modern bikes.

    But I have found a picture of @ThisIsWeird and his bike:

  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Posts: 4,458
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    EEK! EXPOSED!
    It's a beaut, innit?
  • Emily_Joy
    Emily_Joy Posts: 1,159
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    Re: Albermarle - thank you. The current shed is a pent shed and it does leak a little indeed. We don't really have preference, apart from apex will probably look nicer.
    @ThisIsWeird why do you think maintenance of a wooden shed is a pita? We have several wooden constructions anyway, so it doesn't seem to add much. Our bomb shelter is brick and concrete. it has some mdf shelves installed from 2 owners ago and still solid.
    @Grenage we buy seasoned firewood, but also have some of our own - from cutting a large ivy that spread from neighbours garden into ours, and it is undergoing seasoning now. So indoor storage is out of question. Why kiln dried firewood is a waste of money? Sellers seem to advertise it as a better option heat-wise.
    @Alderbank I will take proper measurements of my Gazelle tomorrow :)

  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Posts: 4,458
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    Emily_Joy said:

    @ThisIsWeird why do you think maintenance of a wooden shed is a pita? We have several wooden constructions anyway, so it doesn't seem to add much. Our bomb shelter is brick and concrete. it has some mdf shelves installed from 2 owners ago and still solid.
    Fair do's. They don't really need a 'lot' of maintenance, but if you don't maintain them, expect issues such as rot to begin in around 10 years. And for them to look untidy before then. It all depends on what you are after, and how visible they are.
    If a wooden shed/outhouse is visible and needs to look good, then factor in recoats of whatevs every few years. For such a presumably small shed, I'd be inclined to go for an off-the-shelf jobbie that is fit-and-forget.
    Is the size correct? It ain't 'roomy' for logs and a bike.
  • Grenage
    Grenage Posts: 2,894
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    Emily_Joy said:
    @Grenage we buy seasoned firewood, but also have some of our own - from cutting a large ivy that spread from neighbours garden into ours, and it is undergoing seasoning now. So indoor storage is out of question. Why kiln dried firewood is a waste of money? Sellers seem to advertise it as a better option heat-wise.
    They do indeed, because they charge more, it's often twice the price.  Kiln-dried will end up at the same moisture level as regular seasoned wood unless you are storing it in a home.

    It's easier to light for those who aren't great at managing a fire, but price per kWh it's much worse.
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