Retail online website threatens to remove customers

Received letter from a popular retail company, online shopping.
I have been with the online company for 20 years now with a very good credit rating at all times.
The last few years, I ordered more than one footwear item to try them on. With the intention of keeping one pair.  Shoes are tricky, especially trainers and special events.
This has bumped up my Returns statistics.  I return items within days and never hold on to them for more than a week at the most.
And yet, they still threaten me that I made too many returns.  What is the point of online retail if you cannot try before you buy?
Can they do this?
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Comments

  • Simple answer is yes. Free returns and the such are a calculation on how much you buy vs return. If you return more than you buy (or they believe you’re just trying to get clothes or products for a specific occasion and then return them - thus abusing the policy) they can cancel your account with them. You can appeal to them but there is no formal appeals process. Only exception is if you feel you’ve been discriminated against for a protected characteristic, but that’s a hard thing to prove. 
  • Yes, they can.  They've calculated that you're on the verge of being more trouble than you're worth.  While what you're doing is entirely understandable and practical, you are eating into their margin and adding cost to other customers.  They are at liberty to deny your custom, as long as they're not discriminating on the basis of a protected characteristic.
  • user1977
    user1977 Posts: 13,315
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    Yes, they don't need to do business with you if they don't want to. You may need to reconsider your buying habits, as most people don't do what you're doing. And you're not "trying before you buy", you're buying and then asking for a refund.
  • Simple answer is yes. Free returns and the such are a calculation on how much you buy vs return. If you return more than you buy (or they believe you’re just trying to get clothes or products for a specific occasion and then return them - thus abusing the policy) they can cancel your account with them. You can appeal to them but there is no formal appeals process. Only exception is if you feel you’ve been discriminated against for a protected characteristic, but that’s a hard thing to prove. 
    So, I could not see any policy about "abusing" the policy. I purchased more than I returned usually. Only the last couple of years, I ordered more than one, with the view of trying them on first and returning the rest.  The Terms and Conditions are clear about Return and Refund and I have never "abused" their policy!  
    So,  I see a photograph of trainers, no idea how they will fit and what size (not like shopping in a store).  What should I do if I ordered it and it does not fit yet again?  Lose my money and keep a pair of shoes I will never wear?
  • user1977
    user1977 Posts: 13,315
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    Simple answer is yes. Free returns and the such are a calculation on how much you buy vs return. If you return more than you buy (or they believe you’re just trying to get clothes or products for a specific occasion and then return them - thus abusing the policy) they can cancel your account with them. You can appeal to them but there is no formal appeals process. Only exception is if you feel you’ve been discriminated against for a protected characteristic, but that’s a hard thing to prove. 
    So,  I see a photograph of trainers, no idea how they will fit and what size (not like shopping in a store).  What should I do if I ordered it and it does not fit yet again?  Lose my money and keep a pair of shoes I will never wear?
    You're entitled to return them if you bought them, I presume the company is saying they don't want to sell them to you in the first place?
  • Simple answer is yes. Free returns and the such are a calculation on how much you buy vs return. If you return more than you buy (or they believe you’re just trying to get clothes or products for a specific occasion and then return them - thus abusing the policy) they can cancel your account with them. You can appeal to them but there is no formal appeals process. Only exception is if you feel you’ve been discriminated against for a protected characteristic, but that’s a hard thing to prove. 
    So that is the risk of online Retail.  They've got you!  You try and they don;t fit ..  If I shopped in a store, I would try several pairs before I decide.  Don;t you do that?
  • Hoenir
    Hoenir Posts: 1,210
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    The business sets the terms. If they feel that some customers are taking the mickey and/or are incurring them in too much additional expense. In relation to the actual trade they do. Then yes they have the right to terminate the relationship. That's the reality. The matter won't be up for discussion. 
  • elsien
    elsien Posts: 32,269
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    edited 18 December 2023 at 11:26PM
    Is it Amazon by any chance?

    Whoever it is, they are running a business. And as someone has already said, if your returns are costing them and are pushing them towards nonprofitability, then they are not going to want you as a customer anymore, and that is their decision to make. It’s not a legislative decision, it’s an economic one and they are not obliged to sell to you if they don’t want to.

    Your options are to find somewhere where you can buy in store and try them on. Or spread your purchases between different online shops so your returns are not all to the same place. Or buy more things that you keep.


    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
  • No point discussing here.  This is not a consumer rights but supporting the business (which makes billions £ profit). I guess that's what it is all about.  Best advise,  I'll use Amazon they are best at  online retail and not the UK high street retail websites.
  • elsien said:
    Is it Amazon by any chance?

    Whoever it is, they are running a business. And as someone has already said, if your returns are pushing them towards nonprofitability, then they are not going to want you as a customer anymore, and that is their decision to make. It’s not a legislative decision, it’s an economic one and they are not obliged to sell to you if they don’t want to.

    Your options are to find somewhere where you can buy in store and try them on. Or spread your purchases between different online shops so your returns are not all to the same place. Or buy more things that you keep.
    Not Amazon but a British retail website that is a global website.  Amazon has Consumer Rights that is fair.
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