Help with how much my appliance costs?

TractorFactor
TractorFactor Posts: 80
First Post
Forumite
edited 1 December 2023 at 4:27PM in Energy
Can someone help with a couple of these?

I have something that consumes 0.05 kw kwh a day.
I pay 0.27 per kwh.
Does this mean I am paying 13p a day or 1.3p a day?

Something else consumes 0.50 kw kwh a day.
Does this mean I am paying 13.5p a day?

I think the values are throwing me off as they're fairly low.


EDIT:  Yes, I realise the term "kw" is not right.  So let's just say it's "kwh".  Leaving original so below comments make sense.  The issue is with the data I have, it is displayed like that.  The numbers total PER DAY, not per hour, hence getting rid of the "h" part of "kwh".
«134

Comments

  • Can someone help with a couple of these?

    I have something that consumes 0.05 kw a day.
    I pay 0.27 per kwh.
    Does this mean I am paying 13p a day or 1.3p a day?
    If my "kw" you mean kWh, then at £0.27 / 27p per kWh, so £0.01.35, or 1.35p per day.
    Something else consumes 0.5 kw a day.
    Does this mean I am paying 13.5p a day?
    Yes, correct, provided the same basis, you were confusing kW for kWh. 
    I think the values are throwing me off as they're fairly low.
    What are you trying to work out the usage of and where are you getting the data from? The problem is if you are looking at a device with a constant draw of 0.5kw, that means it will use 12kWh over the course of a day, which is £3.24 based on the 27p per kWh price.
  • PeterGr
    PeterGr Posts: 258
    First Anniversary First Post
    Forumite
    You have to calculate in kWh, which is kw rating for a length of time.

    So if your appliance is rated at 0.05kW (50Watts), and it is used continuously for 24 hours,
    The cost is 0.05 x 24 x 27 = 32.4p

    Similarly, if the appliance is rated at 0.5kW (500W)
    The cost is 0.5 x 24 x 27 = £3.24
  • CliveOfIndia
    CliveOfIndia Posts: 1,187
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    edited 1 December 2023 at 3:57PM
    Well your figures are right as far as they go.  The first one costs 1.2p a day, the second one costs 13.5p a day (ignoring the standing charge which you'll pay irrespective).  And if they do, indeed, use that amount of electricity per day.
    But it seems an odd way of looking at it.  When you say the appliance consumes x KW per day, I'm not sure you're understanding that correctly - it depends entirely on how long it's drawing power for.  It's measured in KWH - KW on its own is pretty meaningless.  So something that's rated as 1 KW (an electric radiator for instance) would consume 1KWH of electricity for every hour that it's switched on (ignoring any switching on/off that the thermostat might do).
    A fridge or freezer might be rated at 700W for the sake of argument, so it'll consume 0.7 KWH for every hour that its running.  But it won't be running constantly as the thermostat will switch it off and on as required.
    A 100W light bulb will consume 0.1 KWH for every hour that it's on - so if you leave it on constantly for 12 hours that'll use 1.2 KWH and cost you 32.4p.
    The figures are easy enough to work out, but your reasoning of "0.5 KW per day" I suspect may be flawed.
  • Can someone help with a couple of these?

    I have something that consumes 0.05 kw a day.
    I pay 0.27 per kwh.
    Does this mean I am paying 13p a day or 1.3p a day?
    If my "kw" you mean kWh, then at £0.27 / 27p per kWh, so £0.01.35, or 1.35p per day.

    What are you trying to work out the usage of and where are you getting the data from? The problem is if you are looking at a device with a constant draw of 0.5kw, that means it will use 12kWh over the course of a day, which is £3.24 based on the 27p per kWh price.
    So 0.05 power usage over 24 hours (that's the total use for 24 hours!) is £1.35?
    I'm a bit confused as £0.01.35 is not £1.35
  • Krakkkers
    Krakkkers Posts: 1,087
    First Post First Anniversary Name Dropper
    Forumite
    Are you talking about something that consumes 50w continually or 50wh in a day?
  • PeterGr said:
    You have to calculate in kWh, which is kw rating for a length of time.

    So if your appliance is rated at 0.05kW (50Watts), and it is used continuously for 24 hours,
    The cost is 0.05 x 24 x 27 = 32.4p

    Similarly, if the appliance is rated at 0.5kW (500W)
    The cost is 0.5 x 24 x 27 = £3.24
    Why is 0.05kW not 5W?  Or if you think it's 50W, why is it not shown as 0.50?

    I know it's confusing but no way is a set of LED Christmas tree lights consuming 32p of electric a day.

    I think the issue is with the data I have - it is displayed in kwh but shows the total for the day (well, since the plug was turned on, which I left on for 24 hours to get the 0.05 number).
  • Can someone help with a couple of these?

    I have something that consumes 0.05 kw a day.
    I pay 0.27 per kwh.
    Does this mean I am paying 13p a day or 1.3p a day?
    If my "kw" you mean kWh, then at £0.27 / 27p per kWh, so £0.01.35, or 1.35p per day.

    What are you trying to work out the usage of and where are you getting the data from? The problem is if you are looking at a device with a constant draw of 0.5kw, that means it will use 12kWh over the course of a day, which is £3.24 based on the 27p per kWh price.
    So 0.05 power usage over 24 hours (that's the total use for 24 hours!) is £1.35?
    I'm a bit confused as £0.01.35 is not £1.35
    Krakkkers said:
    Are you talking about something that consumes 50w continually or 50wh in a day?
    This, we need to know what you are actually talking about in terms of consumption. You seem to confuse kW and kWh, without knowing which you mean we cannot be totally accurate. 

    If something had a constant draw of 0.05kW for 24 hours it would use 1.2kWh of energy over a day, which based on your 27p per kWh figure would cost £0.32.4.
  • Here is a phot from the app:



    This is a lamp with an LED bulb in it.
    Today it has used 0.01 units of electric. 

    If I pay £0.27 per 1.00 units of electricity, then today it's used £0.27 (27p - surely not as it hasn't used 1.00kwh?) or £0.02 - 2p?
  • Krakkkers
    Krakkkers Posts: 1,087
    First Post First Anniversary Name Dropper
    Forumite
    There are 1000 watts in a kilowatt so 0.05 kw is 50w, 0.005kw would be 5w.
  • PeterGr said:
    You have to calculate in kWh, which is kw rating for a length of time.

    So if your appliance is rated at 0.05kW (50Watts), and it is used continuously for 24 hours,
    The cost is 0.05 x 24 x 27 = 32.4p

    Similarly, if the appliance is rated at 0.5kW (500W)
    The cost is 0.5 x 24 x 27 = £3.24
    Why is 0.05kW not 5W?  Or if you think it's 50W, why is it not shown as 0.50?
    You need to be sure what you are actually asking. Are they rated for 5w or 0.05kW, because 0.05kW is 50w, not 5W. The power in W if a constant draw then needs time factored in, which gives the kWh usage which can then be used to calculate cost. 
    I know it's confusing but no way is a set of LED Christmas tree lights consuming 32p of electric a day.
    There is plenty of "way" for a set of LED lights running for 24 hours to use 32p of electricity. 
    I think the issue is with the data I have - it is displayed in kwh but shows the total for the day (well, since the plug was turned on, which I left on for 24 hours to get the 0.05 number).
    Where are you getting your data from?
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 341.5K Banking & Borrowing
  • 249.7K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 449K Spending & Discounts
  • 233.6K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 605.7K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 172.4K Life & Family
  • 246.5K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.8K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards