PLEASE READ BEFORE POSTING

Hello Forumites! In order to help keep the Forum a useful, safe and friendly place for our users, discussions around non-MoneySaving matters are not permitted per the Forum rules. While we understand that mentioning house prices may sometimes be relevant to a user's specific MoneySaving situation, we ask that you please avoid veering into broad, general debates about the market, the economy and politics, as these can unfortunately lead to abusive or hateful behaviour. Threads that are found to have derailed into wider discussions may be removed. Users who repeatedly disregard this may have their Forum account banned. Please also avoid posting personally identifiable information, including links to your own online property listing which may reveal your address. Thank you for your understanding.

Crack on the wall - What do I need to do?

Looking to purchase a property. During the Survey, a hairline crack was observed on the wall. This crack has progressed through the bricks as well. The surveyor recommended that Foundations needs to be checked. 

Upon further inquiry through solicitors; the Vendors are saying that this is a thermal crack and is not a structural issue. It has been reported a few years ago when it appeared, it was surveyed at the time and it was classified as Thermal Crack. 

Where I am with this? I seems to have two different views - its a Foundation issue or its a Thermal Crack. What should I be doing at this time? get it surveyed 3rd time and what if the view is different than.

Also what are the consequences of the thermal crack. Should this be repaired as soon as possible? with the bricks and mortar replaced etc. Or should I be leaving it as it is to evaluate whether it gets worst overtime?

«1

Comments

  • doodling
    doodling Posts: 935
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    Hi,

    You have paid a professional for advice and they have said that the foundations need to be checked.

    You have now been told about some advice the vendor received a while ago which suggests that the foundations do not need to be checked.

    Your surveyor is required to act in your interest in their advice and if they give incorrect advice can be held accountable by you.

    The vendor's surveyor is required to act in the interest of the vendor and is accountable to the vendor if they give incorrect advice, not to you.  (To be fair, a professional surveyor shouldn't be making untrue statements in any event, but the fact remains that if you aren't a surveyor's customer then you have no recourse if they get it wrong).

    Whose advice would you trust?

    I would be going back to my surveyor and asking them to (a) comment on the alternative reason for the crack given by the vendor and (b) advise as to the next step.
  • ProDave
    ProDave Posts: 3,614
    First Anniversary Name Dropper Combo Breaker First Post
    Forumite
    Where does the third picture (with the step in the brick line) fit in with the other two?

    i.e. do you have more than one crack?

    How special is this house?  If you buy it you might have work to do and if you ever sell it you will have buyers asking the same question about the crack(s)

    If there is another you could buy that is just as good without the crack I would just buy a different house.
  • user1977
    user1977 Posts: 13,317
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    Forumite
    Hanzkbar said:

    it was surveyed at the time and it was classified as Thermal Crack. 

    Have you seen this survey? Note though that you wouldn't be able to rely on it anyway (i.e. be entitled to sue that surveyor for getting it wrong).
  • Section62
    Section62 Posts: 7,491
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    Hanzkbar said:

    Upon further inquiry through solicitors; the Vendors are saying that this is a thermal crack and is not a structural issue. It has been reported a few years ago when it appeared, it was surveyed at the time and it was classified as Thermal Crack. 

    You've got crack(s) through bricks close to a corner of a wall.

    I'd love to see a report that confidently puts that down to thermal movement rather than a structural issue.

    For more comprehensive advice from forum members we'd really need to see overview pictures to see how these close-up areas fit within the overall building.
  • As above I'd only be listening to the person acting for you.

    If there is a mortgage you may have problems as it is as you'll struggle to get buildings insurance needing to declare the cracks
  • daveyjp
    daveyjp Posts: 12,386
    First Post Name Dropper First Anniversary
    Forumite
    It needs a wider shot showing the context of the projection as the crack stops at the DPC. Is it a bay window or similar?

    Ask your surveyor that as a foundation problem starts at ground level why no crack below DPC?
  • Section62
    Section62 Posts: 7,491
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    daveyjp said:

    Ask your surveyor that as a foundation problem starts at ground level why no crack below DPC?
    It depends on the type of movement.  If the wall is subject to 'hogging' then typically the crack starts near the top of the wall and works its way down - the crack usually being wider at the top than the bottom.  The DPC acts as a form of discontinuity, the crack can run horizontally for some distance before continuing downwards.
  • stuart45
    stuart45 Posts: 3,822
    First Anniversary Name Dropper First Post
    Forumite
    The best thing to do is to employ your own SE to check the walls. The photos don't show how long a run of brickwork it is. Longer runs are more likely to suffer. They usually crack in the weakest part of the wall at frames, although they can go at corners as they expand and then contract at night and the return brickwork holds the end in place.
  • Tiglet2
    Tiglet2 Posts: 2,456
    First Anniversary Photogenic First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    Hanzkbar said:
    Looking to purchase a property. During the Survey, a hairline crack was observed on the wall. This crack has progressed through the bricks as well. The surveyor recommended that Foundations needs to be checked. 

    Upon further inquiry through solicitors; the Vendors are saying that this is a thermal crack and is not a structural issue. It has been reported a few years ago when it appeared, it was surveyed at the time and it was classified as Thermal Crack. 

    Where I am with this? I seems to have two different views - its a Foundation issue or its a Thermal Crack. What should I be doing at this time? get it surveyed 3rd time and what if the view is different than.

    Also what are the consequences of the thermal crack. Should this be repaired as soon as possible? with the bricks and mortar replaced etc. Or should I be leaving it as it is to evaluate whether it gets worst overtime?


    Quoted in case this thread disappears.

    "It has been reported a few years ago when it appeared, it was surveyed at the time and it was classified as Thermal Crack."

    Ask your solicitor to enquire about the above.  If there is evidence provided to the vendor a few years ago that this is not structural, you and your solicitor need to see the said evidence and proof that it was not structural. 

    Your solicitor is not an expert on structural matters, but if you can see what proper evidence the vendor can provide to satisfy you/your solicitor and lender, before you commission in any further structural surveys, it will assist in your decision as to whether to continue with this property or find an alternative property to purchase.

    At the moment, this is a problem for the vendor to sort out, don't make it your problem.



  • m0bov
    m0bov Posts: 2,509
    First Anniversary Name Dropper First Post
    Forumite
    Looks to me to be thermal, its quite common on properties where its not been tied in close to the corners. You can it stops at the DPC. But, for piece of mind, check with your engineer.
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 341.7K Banking & Borrowing
  • 249.7K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 449.1K Spending & Discounts
  • 233.8K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 606K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 172.5K Life & Family
  • 246.8K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.8K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards