New to car insurance confused

Hey I'm in my 30s and I passed my driving test earlier this year, I had been on Motability for over 6 years prior and held a provisional licence up until passing my test earlier this year 

I've since left the scheme and have gone down the route of getting my own car through finance, 

I noticed that 95% of insurance companies wouldn't even provide me a quote and flat out refused to insure me, I did thankfully get insurance through my now current insurance company but I can't help but think perhaps it's a little too high compared to the average with my age along with how many miles per year for the policy I've got?

It's fully comprehensive cover at driving only 1000 miles per year the car is a automatic 1.6 Diesel,  with a family member on as a named driver who's got over 40+ years driving experience is just over £3000 for the year, is this inherently expensive or in the range of what to expect for holding a full licence for less then a year in there 30s? 

(That is also the cheapest quote I had received some branching out at over £10,000 for the year, and I did check on numerous different vehicles, and websites yet they were all majorly hiked prices)

 is it normal for the vast majority of insurance companies to refuse to give insurance quotes at all for newly qualified drivers? 

And providing there is no problems within this first year is it likely my insurance premium will drop somewhat when I get my next year premium? 

Thank you in advance 

Comments

  • A very low mileage and recently qualified driver will both push up premiums.

    You'll pay less as the years go on (all else being equal), assuming you don't have claims.
  • DullGreyGuy
    DullGreyGuy Posts: 9,148
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    Where you live will have a massive difference on premiums too, London's average premium is double south Wales (though that doesn't strip out the impact of potentially different average vehicle, claims history etc).

     Insurance pricing also compounds (rather than being additive) so each negative impact (eg newly qualified driver, newly purchase car etc) has greater and greater impact when considered as a whole.


  • Were companies actually refusing to insure you as that in itself can cause big problems.

    You've given no indication of what car other than an automatic. An automatic Range Rover is going to be significantly higher than a Micra.

    Motability was also mentioned. Is it possible than any disabilities may also have pushed the premium up
  • DullGreyGuy
    DullGreyGuy Posts: 9,148
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    Were companies actually refusing to insure you as that in itself can cause big problems.

    You've given no indication of what car other than an automatic. An automatic Range Rover is going to be significantly higher than a Micra.
    They are declining to quote as many insurers do every time anyone gets a quote on confused.com etc and causes no problems...anyone under 50 will get a straight decline from Saga for example

    They also said it was a 1.6 diesel which would eliminate a Range Rover and a Micra I suspect
  • Tiexen
    Tiexen Posts: 718
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    Not insurance related but driving a diesel 1000 miles a year is not good for a diesel engine it will clog the DPF
  • Hey thank you for the responses just to add, i haven't previously had any claims and when i was checking for insurance when i checked how much it'd be if i was driving more then 1000 miles for example 3000 it was more expensive then 1000 miles, 

    @bluelad1927 i think so as when i went onto RAC for example it came back stating they couldn't provide me a quote at all, again with Direct line they wouldn't provide me a quote either, i noticed on direct line in the address bar part of the URL contained the word Declined, Tesco also wouldn't provide me with a quote whatsoever there were a multitude of different companies who wouldn't provide me any quotes and i honestly dont know why? 

    with regards to the car it is a Kia Optima 2018, i mean it could be disability related but it's just DVLA aware no restrictions so i'm unsure, regarding driving 1000 miles in a diesel 1000 a year not being good for the engine at the time of getting the vehicle i wasn't aware but i have seen a few reports about this and have been pretty worried about it now, so i might've made a big mistake going for a diesel   :/ other then driving a ton of miles each year is there anything i can do to counteract clogging up the DPF filter like getting the DPF serviced specifically or anything? 


  • wongataa
    wongataa Posts: 2,598
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    Driving only 1000 miles per year with a diesel is fine if in general the journeys are long enough to keep the DPF happy.

    People say things like it isn't enough miles because usually with annual mileages that low most of the journeys will be short which can cause DPF issues.

    If a DPF becomes clogged there are companies out there that can take them out, clean them out, and put them back in.
  • DullGreyGuy
    DullGreyGuy Posts: 9,148
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    SDX91 said:
     i noticed on direct line in the address bar part of the URL contained the word Declined
    That would be as in "declined to quote".

    Insurance is a historic industry and holds onto language which no longer makes sense because how insurance is transacted has changed... it changed even before Direct Line existed. 

    Before you had IT systems that allowed thousands of concurrent quotes to be generated by machines for potential policyholders anywhere in the world you had brokers that had underwriting guides with pricing tables and a calculator. When you approached a broker they'd quote you manually applying the rules as they understood them, assuming you accepted you paid, possibly in cash or sending a cheque, the broker would give you a cover note and the application would be sent to the insurer. You could drive under the cover note whilst the insurer reviewed the application and issued the certificate of insurance. 

    For various reasons sometimes a broker would give a cover note but the insurer subsequently decline to issue the certificate. This was a decline that had to be mentioned going forward. These days cover notes don't exist, systems can talk to each other and get a live decision on if to provide cover or not and the certificate is issued within fractions of a second from the quote being accepted and paid for (by card these days)
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