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Flat roof

Hello

I have had an offer accepted on a house that has a flat roof. I didn't really understand the implications of the flat roof when I looked at the house. The surveyor has said it might be hard to get a mortgage. There were no concerns about damp etc. Also, the roof was replaced 3 years ago (he said to get proof of that).

I am a cash buyer due to inheritance, however I am concerned about having difficulties with selling the property later on. 

Does anyone know how hard it is to get a mortgage for properties with a flat roof?

How hard will it be to get building and home insurance?

Comments

  • user1977
    user1977 Posts: 13,245
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    Don't think it's a general problem, they're very commonplace and mortgageable. Buildings insurance might cost a bit more.
  • YBR
    YBR Posts: 526
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    We had no problem at all - property with flat-roofed extension and garage.
  • Bigphil1474
    Bigphil1474 Posts: 2,225
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    Do you mean a property with a completely flat roof, or just a bit of flat roof? A bit of flat roof shouldn't be a problem, very commonplace. They are also made of different materials, some can last for a very long time, some are designed to last 15 ish years. We had a look at fibre glass for our dorma and there doesn't seem to be much of a time limit on how long they can last.
  • Thanks for your replies. I mean completely flat, no pitched roof at all. 

    Does that change your answers at all? 
  • user1977
    user1977 Posts: 13,245
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    Thanks for your replies. I mean completely flat, no pitched roof at all. 

    Does that change your answers at all? 
    No, that's what I thought you meant.
  • Lorian
    Lorian Posts: 5,658
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    What is is made out of? Felt? Rubber? Fibreglass? Is there a warranty on it, does it have the required level of insulation under it (100-150mm) and a vapour barrier? did the vendor submit a request for Building Regulation approval and was it obtained? Are the edges dammed on the edges where there are no guttering.
  • tacpot12
    tacpot12 Posts: 7,829
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    Roofs that are designed to be 'flat' aren't actually flat at all. They should, if they are designed and built properly have a fall to one side, where the gutter will be installed. 

    Properly installed, a 'flat' roof will have a known lifespan, and promptly repairing or replacing it when it needs it will avoid most if not all problems.
    The comments I post are my personal opinion. While I try to check everything is correct before posting, I can and do make mistakes, so always try to check official information sources before relying on my posts.
  • Insurance can be more expensive on a completely flat roof, and there'll be a smaller choice of insurers as many will not offer cover.

    If there's access to the roof and then to windows or skylights, then insurers might impose security requirements (or decline cover/ increase the premiums.

    Might be worth getting some quotes just so you know.

    These days there are many materials used so find out what it is and research its lifespan. You'll also probably need to specify the material when getting an insurance quote.....
  • user1977
    user1977 Posts: 13,245
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    If there's access to the roof and then to windows or skylights, then insurers might impose security requirements (or decline cover/ increase the premiums.

    FWIW, I've insured flat-roofed properties and never been asked such supplementary questions.
  • Thanks for this info. I will find out more about the flat roof that has been installed. I think I will still proceed, and it's good to know the questions I should be asking and what I should be making sure I factor in when I replace the roof myself later on.
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