Built in oven connection options

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Comments

  • missindie
    missindie Posts: 13 Forumite
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    edited 3 November 2023 at 12:50PM
    @cerebus turns out as well that by looking at fuse box and switching each off individually that my up and down sockets are on the same circuit but my kitchen sockets are on a separate switch. Is this normal? 
  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,588 Forumite
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    Section62 said:
    cerebus said:  As you seem to only have one rcd protecting all your cuircuits , you have to be careful if you just switch off the mcb protecting the circuit you're working on , this is because if you touch the neutral and earth together you will trip the rcd , you will not get a shock however
    The OP shouldn't do what you are recklessly advising them to do, because the level of protection and capacity of that circuit is unclear. You are just guessing and making assumptions.

    It is also dangerous advice to tell the OP "you will not get a shock however".  That again makes certain assumptions about how the existing wiring has been done.

    If the brown round junction box is on a final ring circuit then the OP cannot simply connect the cooker directly to the junction box. Again, if you think it is only a question of 'diversity' then you really aren't qualified to give advice on electrical installation work.
    If the live & neutral have been swapped (not unheard of, and is a possibility if Bodger Joe has been at the electrics), there is a very real risk of a shock. Always, always check all wires for voltage, but not with one of those non-contact testers or a neon screwdriver.
    As for the junction box - It could be a spur off a spur. Without proper investigation, it is unsafe to assume it is even part of a ring main.

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  • @Section62 @FreeBear thank you both so much for your input. Really appreciated. I guess I'm still no further forward in how this can be connected, if at all.  However, I will try to find a decent and knowledgeable electrician to come and look at everything. Seems to be more difficult than I thought lol. Thanks again for your time. 
  • Section62
    Section62 Posts: 7,761 Forumite
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    missindie said:
    @Section62 @FreeBear thank you both so much for your input. Really appreciated. I guess I'm still no further forward in how this can be connected, if at all.  However, I will try to find a decent and knowledgeable electrician to come and look at everything. Seems to be more difficult than I thought lol. Thanks again for your time. 
    The issue is the practical work involved in making the connection is relatively simple, which is why some people can be rather over-enthusiastic about encouraging other people to DIY electrical work.  The difficult part is the theory and technical knowledge that professional electricians need to safely work on electrical systems.  It also requires some test equipment, plus a knowledge of how to use that safely and understand the results.

    Faulty wiring is a cause of house fires, and a significant part of the wiring regulations is about avoiding electrical installations causing fire. (the tangential discussion about the capacity/rating of electrical sockets is part of that).  Circuits under higher load (e.g. hobs/ovens/heaters) come with a higher level of risk than those with lighter loads.

    From a homeowner perspective, if your home was to burn down and the cause was traced to an electrical issue, the insurers may decline to pay a claim (in full) if it becomes apparent the installation was not in accordance with the wiring regs.  If they discover the homeowner themselves carried out non-compliant work then not paying out would be all the more justified.  And that assumes the outcome of the fire was only property damage, rather than anything more serious.

    So, fairly simple to get it to work, but the consequences of getting things wrong can be devastating.  Hence the value in getting a professional electrician involved where there is any doubt.
  • @Section62 I totally understand and agree. Electrics are something I never mess with. I certainly wouldn't be confident in doing anything like this. Just really wanted to clarify if it could be fitted without routing to fuse box due to difficulties with reaching thar. Was really hoping it could be connected somehow to where the hobbies connected (as it would be had I left it there in the first place). Anyway will source a decent electrician hopefully soon! Thanks again for your help much appreciated. 
  • Ectophile
    Ectophile Posts: 7,316 Forumite
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    If the oven and hob are only around the corner from each other, and you have a proper cooker supply, then to me the easiest answer would be to get an electrician to run an extra wire from the hob to the new oven, with them both sharing the cooker circuit.
    The electrician could probably improve that nasty lash-up wiring on the hob while they are at it.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
  • @Ectophile. Thanks very much. I wasn't sure if that was an option and wondered why my guy didn't suggest it (I only thought of it down the line). 
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