HG Mold Remover

I have had problems with mold and in turn removing it, I have finally found a spray called HG mold remover which is extremely effective. My issue is that it's quite lethal especially when spraying it onto ceilings and it also leaves a potent smell which takes some time to disappear and is probably very unhealthy to breathe in.

My question is, can anyone recommend an equally effective mold remover that is less lethal to use?
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  • tacpot12
    tacpot12 Posts: 7,849
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    edited 20 October 2023 at 1:47PM
    No. HG Mold Spray is the only thing i have found that really works.  I agree that the smell is unpleasant, and you're right it's not a good idea to breath it in. The answer is to get a JSP dust mask with A2 organic vapour filters. Cost will be about £45 from Screwfix but you will also get an excellent dust mask that can be used with its orginal filters for DIY work around the home - you need the additional A2 filters to filter out harmful vapour.   
    The comments I post are my personal opinion. While I try to check everything is correct before posting, I can and do make mistakes, so always try to check official information sources before relying on my posts.
  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,251
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    SieIso said: My question is, can anyone recommend an equally effective mold remover that is less lethal to use?
    You could try hydrogen peroxide - Available from some chemists as a 3% or 4% solution. For some moulds, it is an effective treatment,

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  • Emmia
    Emmia Posts: 2,958
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    edited 20 October 2023 at 3:21PM
    I don't spray on the surface directly, I find you get fewer vapors and mist if you spray onto a sponge and wipe (I use the sponge side of a dishwashing sponge, which gets binned afterwards). 

    But, can you make changes to slow / eliminate mould growth, like ventilation, anti mould paint etc. 
  • Marvqn1
    Marvqn1 Posts: 634
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    Cillit Bang Black Mould Remover is effective for removing mold from ceilings. The smell isn't that potent either.
  • cerebus
    cerebus Posts: 515
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    White vinegar works too

    But as others have said you do not have effective ventilation , even having a window open is better than nothing 

    Better is an extract fan with a means of air getting into the room to replace the air sacked out such as a slice taken out of the bottom of the door 
  • HG makes also foam spray, much less of unpleasant  smell, just have to let  it work a littler bit longer ( even less smelly to put in in a paint  kettle and use sponge or a brush to work it in ) . Those  sprays wont get  rid of mould long term though, they  basically burn off everything  on surface so ceiling appear to be clean... Vinegar work as well , if not  better ( it  will leave dead remnants of mould visible though ). There is a treatment  (  called Bactdet  and Halophen IIRC ) -  quite  expensive to buy and not really  needed for light mould infestation . Vinegar  -  sponge or brush it in and let  it work , once dry, paint with any  antimould paint, or even  better - any water based paint with  anti mould additive added ( works out a lot cheaper than a big pot of specialist  paint )
  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,251
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    floppydisk1 said: Vinegar work as well , if not  better ( it  will leave dead remnants of mould visible though ).
    Vinegar is a mild acid which will etch in to the surface of your plaster - So be careful if you do use it.

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  • Bigphil1474
    Bigphil1474 Posts: 2,277
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    edited 23 October 2023 at 7:23AM
    HG spray is ace - just found it last year and transformed my bathroom. However, you should read the instructions, which I am pretty much sure say don't use it on ceilings. The danger is that it will drip right into your face and it's strong stuff.

    When I did my bathroom, I blitzed all the tiles and sealant with it, left it a while, wiped off, then closed the door with the window open and didn't use that room for a good 24 hours. Nearly a year later, and the tiles still look good. Elsewhere I was a bit more liberal with it. If you do want to do the ceiling, I would suggest spraying onto a cloth first and dabbing on. 
  • SieIso
    SieIso Posts: 134
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    I have tried vinegar in the past and it has not had any effect, I have tried improved ventilating etc but nothing works with the exception of HG Spray. The foam sounds like a better option or even the Cillit bang mould remover - does anyone have any experince of either?
  • Bigphil1474
    Bigphil1474 Posts: 2,277
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    The main active ingredient of HG spray is the chlorine (which is the potent smell). I've also previously dabbed thick bleach on to the ceiling - smells for a bit but less than HG.

    Can't say I've used Cillit bang. I did repaint the bathroom ceiling last year with proper bathroom paint, which has helped. I think the paint i used years ago was probably just standard emulsion.

    We only get mould in our bathroom - and only if we don't leave the window open enough. The other thing to look at is insulation above the ceiling if it's caused by condensation - if the ceiling is colder, you'll get more condensation there. If it's caused by damp, find the source. It could also be the room temperature. If the room is warmer, the relative temperature gap is less, so less condensation. Might be worth treating the cause and not the symptom if you can.
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