What insulation can we have between bedroom and Kitchen below it? Can we put rockwool in Ceiling?

Hi all

We are having a new kitchen.  Initially, it was just going to be the kitchen and new downlights in the kitchen ceiling but we have discovered that there is no insulation in the kitchen ceiling (see photo) which explains why when we are in bed we can hear a pin drop in the kitchen below.  So, we are ripping the kitchen ceiling down soon and obviously replacing it.  What insulation is best to use? We cant use slabs etc because its a big kitchen and there's loads of Water pipes, central heating pipes, wires etc.  I assume there will be some fire regulations on what can/cannot be used etc and I also assume there are products that are designed for this type of project.
Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • grumbler
    grumbler Posts: 58,629
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    We cant use slabs etc because its a big kitchen and there's loads of Water pipes, central heating pipes, wires etc.
    I don't see why slabs can't be used. They are easy to cut and complex areas can be filled with smaller blocks. For sound insulation there are special acustic, higher density, rockwool slabs. The only issue is that it's better not to have socket cables buried in the insulation and the downlights need some free space around (see the specifications)

  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,262
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    One doesn't usually put insulation between the ceiling & floor unless it is an acoustic batt to limit noise transmission. Acoustic insulation is a complex subject, often with some very expensive & technical solutions. But the basics is to add mass and avoid using large spans of thin materials that could act like a drum skin.
    That said, when I replaced my kitchen ceiling, I filled the void with fibreglass loft insulation. Primarily to reduce any cold draughts in the void, but also in an attempt to reduce noise. Debatable as to whether it made any difference to heat loss in the room above, although it did reduce the perceived noise in the room a little. In conjunction with a fire resistant plasterboard, the insulation will provide a little bit more protection in the event of the unthinkable.
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  • Eldi_Dos
    Eldi_Dos Posts: 1,533
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    If you do not mind doing the work from above, once you have kitchen ceiling in place and downlighters have protector   hoods in place you could lift some floorboards above and put loose fill insulation in. Loose fill cellulose claims to be green and fire retardant, with this type of product you should be able to get it into all the nooks and crannies which will  cut down on noise from below.
  • 35har1old
    35har1old Posts: 953
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    Eldi_Dos said:
    If you do not mind doing the work from above, once you have kitchen ceiling in place and downlighters have protector   hoods in place you could lift some floorboards above and put loose fill insulation in. Loose fill cellulose claims to be green and fire retardant, with this type of product you should be able to get it into all the nooks and crannies which will  cut down on noise from below.
    If you insulate before replastering there could be a risk of mould developing unless you have good ventilation during the drying process
  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,262
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    35har1old said:
    Eldi_Dos said:
    If you do not mind doing the work from above, once you have kitchen ceiling in place and downlighters have protector   hoods in place you could lift some floorboards above and put loose fill insulation in. Loose fill cellulose claims to be green and fire retardant, with this type of product you should be able to get it into all the nooks and crannies which will  cut down on noise from below.
    If you insulate before replastering there could be a risk of mould developing unless you have good ventilation during the drying process
    In my experience, not likely to happen. Even if mould did gain a foothold, it will die off once the plaster has dried (which should only take a few days).

    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
  • Jonboy_1984
    Jonboy_1984 Posts: 1,194
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    Also just be aware that cables running in insulation normally need to be thicker diameter cable than those in free air due to the heat build up, and it might be worth asking a sparky if any need changing whilst the ceiling is down.

    (Particularly the case if there are any 6mm cables to cookers or power showers or 2.5mm cables to sockets).
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