DIY borrowed light window

Hi, I need to help modernising this window (provided picture with this thread). It’s called a ‘borrowed light’ window and it’s an internal window designed to provide light from the living into my kitchen room which doesn’t get much natural light. Anyway that means I have to keep this space rather than block it out but I’d like to make it more modern. Does anyone have any experience or tips on how to remove the edging and the glass with our accidentally damaging the structure of the wall? I’m so worried about damaging the whole wall but I’d really like the remove the edging as not squared off properly and either replace the glass with some clearer or just have it as a gap. 

Comments

  • grumbler
    grumbler Forumite Posts: 57,743
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    edited 21 August at 10:21PM
    I don't think that you can make any structural damage by removing the decorative edging and the glass. It can't be load-bearing.
    However, if it's a brick wall and there is no lintel, then, indeed, the timber frame can bear the load. Remove the decorative architrave at the top and, most likely, you'll be able to see what's behind it.
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  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Forumite Posts: 2,860
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    Apart from the glass, what exactly do you wish to remove?
  • daivid
    daivid Forumite Posts: 1,074
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    Is it the trim holding it in or is it putty on the other side?
  • ThisIsWeird
    ThisIsWeird Forumite Posts: 2,860
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    edited 22 August at 6:47AM
    Assuming by 'edging' you mean the timber beading that holds the glass in place, if you post a close-up pic of this edging on both sides, we can advise further.
  • Emmia
    Emmia Forumite Posts: 2,253
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    edited 23 August at 5:42AM
    If the glass is between your kitchen and living room and you remove it, leaving a gap, you may increase the fire risk of the property. 

    This may not be an issue for you, but could be an issue later on when the property is sold.

  • CSI_Yorkshire
    CSI_Yorkshire Forumite Posts: 1,792
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    Emmia said:
    If the glass is between your kitchen and living room and you remove it, leaving a gap, you may increase the fire risk of the property. 

    This may not be an issue for you, but could be an issue later on when the property is sold.

    With the amount of open plan living spaces now, I think very few people will care.
  • daivid
    daivid Forumite Posts: 1,074
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    Emmia said:
    If the glass is between your kitchen and living room and you remove it, leaving a gap, you may increase the fire risk of the property. 

    This may not be an issue for you, but could be an issue later on when the property is sold.

    With a decent set of smoke detectors fire risk wouldn’t bother me at all. If my cooking produced lots of smoke and/or steam the inconvenience of the living room smoke detector being triggered would, for that reason and to reduce transfer of sound and smells I'd replace the glass with a more modern pane. 
  • Emmia
    Emmia Forumite Posts: 2,253
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    edited 23 August at 9:45AM
    Emmia said:
    If the glass is between your kitchen and living room and you remove it, leaving a gap, you may increase the fire risk of the property. 

    This may not be an issue for you, but could be an issue later on when the property is sold.

    With the amount of open plan living spaces now, I think very few people will care.
    I mention it, as I know someone who knocked a hole through their wall as a serving hatch between their kitchen and living room - the hole  and the layout of their house means that they have a greater fire risk as a result - especially in relation to exit points.

    If it's reglazed with plain or another pattern of glass then it's not an issue, but I'd think carefully about leaving a hole, which is why I raise it.
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