Buying a house with girlfiend

Hi, just after some information on where people stand when buying a house with a girlfriend. 
After divorcing over a year ago I am now thinking about my future and how to protect myself when in a further relationship.
Can legal agreements between non married couples be drawn up if you purchase a house together. Say I put in 60/40 monthly or a bigger deposit can this be made so in the event of a split you both get back what you agreed at the start?
I currently own a property and so does she, we are both looking to rent out our individual properties out and buy together. We both have children from a previous relationship but not together. What would my rights be if we were to have a child together but not married and split? Could she make me leave the house for 18 years? I have heard and read this on the internet. If this is the case what protection do guys have when in this situation apart from getting the snip.

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  • Scorpio33
    Scorpio33 Posts: 745
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    Yes . I am in a similar position, but I currently own my own house and she doesn't.

    if she is not on the deeds, unmarried, as long as she doesn't contribute anything to the house (including major works to the house), then she won't have a claim.

    If you are both going to be on the deeds (& presumably mortgage), you need the title held as tenants in common(rather than join tenants), as well as getting a trust deed drawn up. This will detail what % of the house you own, and what % she owns.  Then if you split, you are both entitled to you resepctive %s (after costs).

    Should you have a child together, the needs of the child comes first. If she is the main carer for the child, it would mean that housing her and the child would be seen as a proirity. This could mean that she stays in the house and you move out, but it depends on who is the main carer, your respective earning powers and what is best for the child long term. Even if you moved out, you would still be entitled to your share.


  • If it were me I would do it 50/50 jointly.  Both put the same in for deposit.  If she can't afford to contribute 50% to the mortgage and bills, I would step up as a partner and pay the rest but still keep the agreement 50/50.  There's always a partner on less money than the other and in my view, the mortgage and bills should really be based on a percentage of your earnings.  For example, you earn 20k and she earns 10k, I would expect you to pay more so it feels the same for each.
  • Exodi
    Exodi Posts: 2,769
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    edited 6 September 2023 at 10:09AM
    mallen said:
    Hi, just after some information on where people stand when buying a house with a girlfriend. 
    After divorcing over a year ago I am now thinking about my future and how to protect myself when in a further relationship.
    Can legal agreements between non married couples be drawn up if you purchase a house together. Say I put in 60/40 monthly or a bigger deposit can this be made so in the event of a split you both get back what you agreed at the start?
    Very common and easy to do -

    Done by a 'Deed of Trust' and owning the house as 'Tenants in Common'. A Deed of Trust is a document written with a solicitor in which you define how the proceeds of the house will be divvied up in the event of a sale.

    An unequal initial contribution stipulated to be returned after a split is very normal.
    If it were me I would do it 50/50 jointly.  Both put the same in for deposit.  If she can't afford to contribute 50% to the mortgage and bills, I would step up as a partner and pay the rest but still keep the agreement 50/50. 
    We'll see if you think the same after you have walked a mile in the OP's shoes (e.g. a divorcee) or if the partner you agreed to be joint tenants with cheats on you and takes the full half the house you gracefully gifted.

    Expecting people to just gift their girlfriend tens of thousands of pounds, while romantic, is not realistic and makes for terrible money saving advice.
    Know what you don't
  • castle96
    castle96 Posts: 2,874
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    there is no 'romance' in these financial decisions/safeguards. Think of the worst and 'protect' against it
  • MrsStepford
    MrsStepford Posts: 1,483
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    My brother's wife took the entire house when she divorced him. When he and second wife bought together they had his kids and hers, living with them in a smaller house. 
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