Other half is moving in, how much rent should I charge?

It's a new relationship and the question is what's the most I can charge without them having a claim on my property if it all goes west?
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  • kaMelo
    kaMelo Posts: 2,280
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    edited 19 January 2023 at 12:33AM
    Assuming you own the home zero towards your mortgage (if you have one), share all other bills at whatever ratio you agree upon..
  • Marvel1
    Marvel1 Posts: 7,134
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    edited 19 January 2023 at 2:40PM
    50/50 bills only or just don't go ahead with it.

    You are saving money by paying 50% if you have a TV licence, broadband, unmetered water.
    Also an extra 25% on the council tax.
  • elsien
    elsien Posts: 32,250
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    Why would you be charging rent? 
    They are a partner not a lodger. 
    You would be paying your mortgage anyway and you don’t want them to have a claim on the property so whatever between you, you feel as a sensible split of the day to day bills, food et cetera.

    That may leave them with more spending on a day-to-day basis, but it leaves you with a property which hopefully is appreciating in value and where you have security but they don’t because you can throw them out at any point. Swings and roundabouts.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
  • Scorpio33
    Scorpio33 Posts: 745
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    Technically, you can charge what you like, as long as both of you are clear that it is money towards bills and not the mortgage. In legal terms, as long as she is paying you (and she is not paying that mortgage company directly) you should be covered.

    However, practically, you may want to agree between you a fair split, based on earning power, current financial commitments, and childcare (if relevant). 

    My other half moved in June 2022, we agreed that she will pay me for 50% of the bills after she moves in, which includes food, but excludes the mortgage. Both happy that if it goes wrong, she doesn't get any of the house. Things may change in the future and we may get married at some point which will obviously change things.
  • Spendless
    Spendless Posts: 23,999
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    There isn't a maximum amount you can charge without them being able to make a  claim on your property. If they contribute to the mortgage they can make a claim.  They can also potentially make a claim if they've paid for/contributed to improvements etc eg they pay for your property to be double glazed. 


  • Mark300zx
    Mark300zx Posts: 185
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    elsien said:
    Why would you be charging rent? 
    They are a partner not a lodger. 
    You would be paying your mortgage anyway and you don’t want them to have a claim on the property so whatever between you, you feel as a sensible split of the day to day bills, food et cetera.

    That may leave them with more spending on a day-to-day basis, but it leaves you with a property which hopefully is appreciating in value and where you have security but they don’t because you can throw them out at any point. Swings and roundabouts.

    Rent is a term for a contribution to living there, they may buy a property to rent out while with me so they would benefit from that, also if they are a partner shouldn't they share costs but not wish to be reimbursed for the benefit of moving in?
  • Mark300zx
    Mark300zx Posts: 185
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    Mark300zx said:
    It's a new relationship and the question is what's the most I can charge without them having a claim on my property if it all goes west?
    As this is, as you say, a new relationship, perhaps you should wait a little longer before your partner moves in so that you can both appreciate the other person's attitude to questions like this?

    I have seen too many friends get financially trashed by partners to not ask awkward questions!
  • MobileSaver
    MobileSaver Posts: 4,134
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    Mark300zx said:
    elsien said:
    Why would you be charging rent? They are a partner not a lodger. 
    You would be paying your mortgage anyway and you don’t want them to have a claim on the property so whatever between you, you feel as a sensible split of the day to day bills, food et cetera.
    Rent is a term for a contribution to living there, they may buy a property to rent out while with me so they would benefit from that, also if they are a partner shouldn't they share costs but not wish to be reimbursed for the benefit of moving in?
    You can't have it both ways.
    Your partner contributing (typically 50%) to normal living costs that everyone has to pay is fine however if they contribute to the mortgage and/or improvements to the property then eventually they will (rightfully) have a claim on the property.
    It's the same if "they buy a property to rent out while with me". If you contribute to the mortgage for that rental and/or contribute to the costs of that property in other ways then you would also eventually have a claim on it barring any evidenced agreement to the contrary.
    So to answer your original question, the most you can "charge" is probably 50% of your normal monthly bills (excluding mortgage and buildings insurance). Charge more than that and you're making a rod for your own back if things go pear-shaped in the future.
    Oh and don't call it "rent" as that could introduce another world of pain if things get ugly at any point.

    Every generation blames the one before...
    Mike + The Mechanics - The Living Years
  • Mojisola
    Mojisola Posts: 35,544
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    Mark300zx said:
    It's a new relationship and the question is what's the most I can charge without them having a claim on my property if it all goes west?
    Looking at it from your partner's point of view, they will have absolutely no rights of occupation - you could tell them to leave at a moment's notice and they would have to go.
    It's worth suggesting that they put away every month money that would have been spent on rent in order to build up a fund to cover temporary accommodation and enough money to cover all the costs getting somewhere else to live.
    If the relationship goes well and becomes permanent, agree that those savings can go towards the mortgage, home improvements, a joint holiday or whatever suits you both.
    That arrangement works well for a lot of couples - the person moving in doesn't feel they are being subsidised by their partner and the home owner doesn't feel as if they are being taken advantage of with their OH having a lot more disposable income.
    If you can't come to some arrangement that suits you both, it's probably too early in the relationship to live together.
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