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Changing just one tyre

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13

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  • SergeantBaker
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    mgfvvc said:
    Are we talking about  people that drive around corners on the limit or brake at the last minute?? Or people that drive sensibly and could take a corner with slicks on ice without sliding off the road and use the engine to slow rather than the brakes?
    or people that might encounter a pedestrian stepping out from behind a van, a deer running out from hedge or a car running a red light?

    Hi


    The thing is and which many good drivers are aware of, as the thread is worn down on any tyre, the braking distances increase.

    I always get my tyres changed long before legal limits as it is not worth the risk.

    Thanks
    Is it?

    How do racing cars manage to brake when not on wet weather tyres then?

    Given you have held a race licence you'll have no problems with that. 
  • SergeantBaker
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    400ixl said:
    One misconception to correct is that you best tyres should always be on the rear axle, regardless of front or rear wheel drive. More so on front wheel drive.

    On the front you have both steering and acceleration / deceleration control to adjust to any lack of grip. On the rear you have deceleration.

    This is a long proven fact, unfortunately too many people don't know it.
    Hello

    I've had a look through the posts, did anyone say that as I've not noted it.
    I'm not havig a go at you just want to know why you said that, please?

    Many thanks i advance.
    Given the claims you've made as a driver you should know that fact. 
  • 400ixl
    400ixl Posts: 3,107 Forumite
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    There was a post about moving the mismatch from the front to the rear due to an imbalance and all being good. That is not the correct answer as all you do in that situation is mask a bigger potential problem.

    It was purely to point out the safety aspect of where you should have the better grip on a vehicle.

  • caprikid1
    caprikid1 Posts: 2,186 Forumite
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    I think a lot of us still remember this...

    (2399) Radial And Cross Ply Mix UK Public Information Film - YouTube

    I still think good practice is to keep everything the same on one axle that way the car should always stop balanced if you hit the brakes hard at speed in the wet.

  • Ebe_Scrooge
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    400ixl said:
    One misconception to correct is that you best tyres should always be on the rear axle, regardless of front or rear wheel drive. More so on front wheel drive.

    On the front you have both steering and acceleration / deceleration control to adjust to any lack of grip. On the rear you have deceleration.

    This is a long proven fact, unfortunately too many people don't know it.
    There is a good reason for the argument of having the best tyres on the rear, and that's simply because they're likely to have the most amount of grip.  If the front wheels lose grip then you'll get understeer, which most average drivers can cope with.  If the rear wheels lose grip then there's the risk of oversteer, which is much more difficult to control, unless you've been trained or had lots of practice at it.
    So yes, your argument that the front wheel provide both power and steering (in FWD cars) is very valid.  I'm just pointing out that there's also a valid argument for putting the best tyres on the back.

  • rdr
    rdr Posts: 401 Forumite
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    In addition to this I always put new tires on the back and move the previous ones forward because otherwise there is so little wear on the tyres on the back that they tend to die of old age before they wear out meaning you have to buy more tyres in the long term. It also smooths the cash flow as you are buying two tyres at a time at fairly regular intervals rather than having to buy four occasionally.
  • maurice28
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    Thanks all who replied to this - used the car all weekend and it feels exactly the same, so (as most seem to suggest) hopefully it's no issue at all!
  • CoastingHatbox
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    mgfvvc said:
    Are we talking about  people that drive around corners on the limit or brake at the last minute?? Or people that drive sensibly and could take a corner with slicks on ice without sliding off the road and use the engine to slow rather than the brakes?
    or people that might encounter a pedestrian stepping out from behind a van, a deer running out from hedge or a car running a red light?

    Hi


    The thing is and which many good drivers are aware of, as the thread is worn down on any tyre, the braking distances increase.

    I always get my tyres changed long before legal limits as it is not worth the risk.

    Thanks

    https://www.carsuk.net/michelin-say-dont-change-tyres-hit-legal-limit/

    > Michelin are advising car owners not to change tyres when they wear to 3mm, but to keep them until they hit the legal limit of 1.6mm.

    There's a more detailed article somewhere. Good quality tyres will continue to perform well enough until they reach 1.6mm of tread. Further more, because the rate of wear slows down, a tyre with 3mm tread still has 30% of it's usable life remaining.

    Buy quality tyres, use them right up until the legal limit rather than buy budget tyres that perform poorly to begin with.

    A dream is not reality, but who's to say which is which?
  • Money_Grabber13579
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    mgfvvc said:
    Are we talking about  people that drive around corners on the limit or brake at the last minute?? Or people that drive sensibly and could take a corner with slicks on ice without sliding off the road and use the engine to slow rather than the brakes?
    or people that might encounter a pedestrian stepping out from behind a van, a deer running out from hedge or a car running a red light?

    Hi


    The thing is and which many good drivers are aware of, as the thread is worn down on any tyre, the braking distances increase.

    I always get my tyres changed long before legal limits as it is not worth the risk.

    Thanks

    https://www.carsuk.net/michelin-say-dont-change-tyres-hit-legal-limit/

    > Michelin are advising car owners not to change tyres when they wear to 3mm, but to keep them until they hit the legal limit of 1.6mm.

    There's a more detailed article somewhere. Good quality tyres will continue to perform well enough until they reach 1.6mm of tread. Further more, because the rate of wear slows down, a tyre with 3mm tread still has 30% of it's usable life remaining.

    Does it? I always thought the rate of wear became faster (as in the tyre becomes of slightly smaller circumference and so has to  turn through more revolutions to cover the same distance).
    Northern Ireland club member No 382 :j
  • diystarter7
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    mgfvvc said:
    Are we talking about  people that drive around corners on the limit or brake at the last minute?? Or people that drive sensibly and could take a corner with slicks on ice without sliding off the road and use the engine to slow rather than the brakes?
    or people that might encounter a pedestrian stepping out from behind a van, a deer running out from hedge or a car running a red light?

    Hi


    The thing is and which many good drivers are aware of, as the thread is worn down on any tyre, the braking distances increase.

    I always get my tyres changed long before legal limits as it is not worth the risk.

    Thanks

    https://www.carsuk.net/michelin-say-dont-change-tyres-hit-legal-limit/

    > Michelin are advising car owners not to change tyres when they wear to 3mm, but to keep them until they hit the legal limit of 1.6mm.

    There's a more detailed article somewhere. Good quality tyres will continue to perform well enough until they reach 1.6mm of tread. Further more, because the rate of wear slows down, a tyre with 3mm tread still has 30% of it's usable life remaining.

    Buy quality tyres, use them right up until the legal limit rather than buy budget tyres that perform poorly to begin with.

    Hi 

    Thanks for that.

    I will run our tyres close to the limit but as I worry etc and fully aware that braking is affected, EG the difference between an accindet and not, ie contact with the other item can be 1mm.  I've seen tests on cars with same tyres, same cars, same road conditions where they brake from 30/50 and 70mph and the distance between new tryes and getting to about 2/3 mm can be staggering - ie emegency braking

    I think all cars have anti-lick brakes and ESP as standard for years this helps a lot but come an emergency a brand new tyre will perform a lot better than one near the legal limit
    I changed all 4 tyres on the gls when there was close to 4mm at least as on tyre got a crew and non-repairable as tyres are very exnpsive on my car and I hardly drive the gls, I thought it was best to replace all 4 but worried about getting another puncture.


    I agree that good quality and even some others may perform well as they do but at times the difference can be a mm, inches are even feet but I hear you and agree with you

    Thanks


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