Managing Sequence of Risk

in Savings & Investments
56 replies 2.5K views
Heard about this recently, anyone been impacted by this in a negative way, but managed to get through it ?
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  • LintonLinton Forumite
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    You wont get much of a response to your question I am afraid as very few people in this country would have met an SORR.  The last event that could have represented a Sequence of Returns Risk was the 2008 crash, though in the event recovery was reasonably quick and was followed by a decade of unprecedented rises in the markets  Anyone taking retirement up to 2008 would probably have bought an annuity since annuity rates were much higher than now.  Drawdown was a niche option then only fully available to people who could show they had significant other ncome.

    I retired prior to 2008 but as I was planning to buy annuities most of my investments were in low risk funds.  Looking at the graph of my wealth the 2008 crash had no noticeable effect.
  • edited 17 January at 8:45AM
    ChesterDogChesterDog Forumite
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    edited 17 January at 8:45AM
    I have, although I can't recall much detail.

    We retired early by selling our business in about 2005.

    Started investing seriously in 2007... straight into the plunge! That certainly focused the mind.

    A large proportion of our investments were externally managed. We took those back under our own control, stayed invested, came out the other side and lived to tell the tale.
    I am one of the Dogs of the Index.
  • JohnWinderJohnWinder Forumite
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    "I have been retired for 10 years. I am one who has said over and over again. Stay the course. Look for the long term. Yeah, sure. That's fine until today. Today did it. I am just starting to be scared so that I won't tell my wife what happened today...stocks down...bonds down...I'm down."
    This is a live, ball by ball account of what it felt like in 2008, and how it turned out over 13 years. You can almost smell the fear.
  • MaxiRobriguezMaxiRobriguez Forumite
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    Unlikely to find many people who really timed it badly.

    Realistically need to find someone that averaged in from 1998 through to 2001 or so, who won't have seen any positive returns (dividends excluded) for near 12 years.

    Forecasting/planning around SORR is meant to be around those times, not a market sell off which recovers within 2-3 years or less, which can be managed with a reasonably small cash allocation.
  • FIREmenowFIREmenow Forumite
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    "I have been retired for 10 years. I am one who has said over and over again. Stay the course. Look for the long term. Yeah, sure. That's fine until today. Today did it. I am just starting to be scared so that I won't tell my wife what happened today...stocks down...bonds down...I'm down."
    This is a live, ball by ball account of what it felt like in 2008, and how it turned out over 13 years. You can almost smell the fear.
    Thanks @JohnWinder - read that whole thread and it was really interesting (and scary!).  Seems to have provided an important cautionary tale to some approaching retirement, and even helped some people hold on during the March 2020 drop.  Must remember to go back there during the next bear market.
  • bostonerimusbostonerimus Forumite
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    I was a few years from retirement in 2008 and I managed to rebalance and keep buying equities through the crash so that by my retirement in 2014 I had made everything back and was actually well set again. But it convinced me that I wanted to avoid sequence or return risk so I made plans to rely on my DB pension and rental income rather than my DC pension pot and other investments. Then the Covid crash came and I halved my tenants rent for a few months while she couldn't work. But the DB pension and cash kept things comfortable. My DC pot took a big hit, but, again, it's now back up and doing well. So have sources of income that are not directly lined to the markets and some cash and you can avoid SORR.
    “So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
  • tacpot12tacpot12 Forumite
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    I think I have manage to avoid SORR during the dip caused by the pandemic duing 2020 by having my retirement portfolio mainly invested in income-producing Investment Trusts (ITs) and Funds. Because I am withdrawing the income and not reinvesting it, if the income is lower, it doesn't affect my future income, just my current income and I have a cash buffer in my SIPP that allowed me to continue to withdraw cash at the same rate for a couple of years. 

    My dividend income is significantly up over the last 18 months, so there was a strong rebound in dividend payments, and I am on track to have two full years with above average levels of dividend income. (normally I expect about 4% pa, but in late 2020 & early 2021 I had 4.5% and late 2021 and early 2022 looks like it might be closer to 5%.   

    It was my experience during the pandemic that most of the ITs that I hold used capital reserves to support their dividend payments to some degree. They did not maintain dividend levels at their previous rate, but neither did they drop in the way that the dividends did from a couple of EFTs that I hold. 
    The comments I post are my personal opinion. While I try to check everything is correct before posting, I can and do make mistakes, so always try to check official information sources before relying on my posts.
  • AegisAegis Forumite
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    Then the Covid crash came and I halved my tenants rent for a few months while she couldn't work.
    We don't always see eye to eye, but that was a really decent thing to do, so you have my respect for this action, for what it's worth.

    I am a Chartered Financial Planner
    Anything I say on the forum is for discussion purposes only and should not be construed as personal financial advice. It is vitally important to do your own research before acting on information gathered from any users on this forum.
  • coyrlscoyrls Forumite
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    tacpot12 said:
    I think I have manage to avoid SORR during the dip caused by the pandemic duing 2020 
    But there was no "sequence" of poor returns, it was a temporary dip.  Sequence normally refers to multi-year poor returns.

  • AlbermarleAlbermarle Forumite
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    Realistically need to find someone that averaged in from 1998 through to 2001 or so, who won't have seen any positive returns (dividends excluded) for near 12 years.

    1998 to 2001 , is only three years , not 12 ?

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