Someone using my details to sign up on gambling sites for free bets

On a couple of occasions recently I've had an email in my inbox welcoming me to a gambling site which I've never signed up for. These are well known gambling sites (Pokerstars was one) and in each case I went to the site and contacted their customer service to get the account blocked. On one occasion I used the forgot password feature to access the account and could see that someone had put my name, email and address in to set it up, they'd taken a free bet offer, done some bets and then withdrawn it.

I've since read that this is a relatively common scam - people get your details somehow (e.g. a data leak on another website) and then sign up for huge numbers of free bets on gambling sites. Obviously I don't want this to happen again. I wondered if anyone else has experienced it and what they did.

My first thought was to sign up for Gamstop (the self exclusion from gambling websites service) as this would automatically block any future account creation using my details. My only concern is whether this will make me look like a gambling addict and cause some kind of problems down the line.
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Comments

  • Your concern is unfounded.  Nobody will know "you" have signed up to a bunch of gambling sites.  The only downside to this for you is that you won't be eligible for new customer free bets with any sites they signed up in your name.
  • JJ_Egan
    JJ_Egan Posts: 20,281
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    Is it praise or a warning ??
  • Your concern is unfounded.  Nobody will know "you" have signed up to a bunch of gambling sites.  The only downside to this for you is that you won't be eligible for new customer free bets with any sites they signed up in your name.
    My concern isn't that someone will know I've signed up to these gambling sites, it's that there might be some negative consequences from signing up to Gamstop to prevent this from happening.
  • Your concern is unfounded.  Nobody will know "you" have signed up to a bunch of gambling sites.  The only downside to this for you is that you won't be eligible for new customer free bets with any sites they signed up in your name.
    My concern isn't that someone will know I've signed up to these gambling sites, it's that there might be some negative consequences from signing up to Gamstop to prevent this from happening.
    The only negative would be that it'll stop you from gambling too.
  • mjm3346
    mjm3346 Posts: 46,854
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    On a couple of occasions recently I've had an email in my inbox welcoming me to a gambling site which I've never signed up for. These are well known gambling sites (Pokerstars was one) and in each case I went to the site and contacted their customer service to get the account blocked. On one occasion I used the forgot password feature to access the account and could see that someone had put my name, email and address in to set it up, they'd taken a free bet offer, done some bets and then withdrawn it.

    I've since read that this is a relatively common scam - people get your details somehow (e.g. a data leak on another website) and then sign up for huge numbers of free bets on gambling sites. Obviously I don't want this to happen again. I wondered if anyone else has experienced it and what they did.

    My first thought was to sign up for Gamstop (the self exclusion from gambling websites service) as this would automatically block any future account creation using my details. My only concern is whether this will make me look like a gambling addict and cause some kind of problems down the line.
    Wouldn't they need bank/card details to match the account details if they are withdrawing money and have passed ID checks?
  • mjm3346 said:
    On a couple of occasions recently I've had an email in my inbox welcoming me to a gambling site which I've never signed up for. These are well known gambling sites (Pokerstars was one) and in each case I went to the site and contacted their customer service to get the account blocked. On one occasion I used the forgot password feature to access the account and could see that someone had put my name, email and address in to set it up, they'd taken a free bet offer, done some bets and then withdrawn it.

    I've since read that this is a relatively common scam - people get your details somehow (e.g. a data leak on another website) and then sign up for huge numbers of free bets on gambling sites. Obviously I don't want this to happen again. I wondered if anyone else has experienced it and what they did.

    My first thought was to sign up for Gamstop (the self exclusion from gambling websites service) as this would automatically block any future account creation using my details. My only concern is whether this will make me look like a gambling addict and cause some kind of problems down the line.
    Wouldn't they need bank/card details to match the account details if they are withdrawing money and have passed ID checks?
    There's no indication they have these details so I guess not. I don't really have any idea how the scam works, I just don't want my details being used for it. 
  • mjm3346
    mjm3346 Posts: 46,854
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    mjm3346 said:
    On a couple of occasions recently I've had an email in my inbox welcoming me to a gambling site which I've never signed up for. These are well known gambling sites (Pokerstars was one) and in each case I went to the site and contacted their customer service to get the account blocked. On one occasion I used the forgot password feature to access the account and could see that someone had put my name, email and address in to set it up, they'd taken a free bet offer, done some bets and then withdrawn it.

    I've since read that this is a relatively common scam - people get your details somehow (e.g. a data leak on another website) and then sign up for huge numbers of free bets on gambling sites. Obviously I don't want this to happen again. I wondered if anyone else has experienced it and what they did.

    My first thought was to sign up for Gamstop (the self exclusion from gambling websites service) as this would automatically block any future account creation using my details. My only concern is whether this will make me look like a gambling addict and cause some kind of problems down the line.
    Wouldn't they need bank/card details to match the account details if they are withdrawing money and have passed ID checks?
    There's no indication they have these details so I guess not. I don't really have any idea how the scam works, I just don't want my details being used for it. 


    They almost certainly must have some matching details to be able to withdraw the money from any winnings to a card/paypal e-mail address etc  - I would think the site you accessed should show the method used for withdrawals.
    (one of the scams involves sending out fake welcome e-mails)
  • mjm3346 said:
    mjm3346 said:
    On a couple of occasions recently I've had an email in my inbox welcoming me to a gambling site which I've never signed up for. These are well known gambling sites (Pokerstars was one) and in each case I went to the site and contacted their customer service to get the account blocked. On one occasion I used the forgot password feature to access the account and could see that someone had put my name, email and address in to set it up, they'd taken a free bet offer, done some bets and then withdrawn it.

    I've since read that this is a relatively common scam - people get your details somehow (e.g. a data leak on another website) and then sign up for huge numbers of free bets on gambling sites. Obviously I don't want this to happen again. I wondered if anyone else has experienced it and what they did.

    My first thought was to sign up for Gamstop (the self exclusion from gambling websites service) as this would automatically block any future account creation using my details. My only concern is whether this will make me look like a gambling addict and cause some kind of problems down the line.
    Wouldn't they need bank/card details to match the account details if they are withdrawing money and have passed ID checks?
    There's no indication they have these details so I guess not. I don't really have any idea how the scam works, I just don't want my details being used for it. 


    They almost certainly must have some matching details to be able to withdraw the money from any winnings to a card/paypal e-mail address etc  - I would think the site you accessed should show the method used for withdrawals.
    (one of the scams involves sending out fake welcome e-mails)
    Although I said they withdrew the money, I didn't actually have a chance to properly check what they did with the free bet as the site deleted the account almost immediately. They might not have withdrawn it and did something else - e.g. you can manipulate tables in online poker with multiple users blowing hands so someone can earn money on their real account. In any case, just take it as read that I've already done a number of checks to make sure my bank details are secure and that this is not my concern.

    What I was interested in is anyone who has also experienced this problem before or used Gamstop. The latter seems like an obvious way to solve it, but despite it appearing not to cause any issues at first glance, I don't know enough about it in practice to be completely sure there isn't a downside to it.
  • MalMonroe
    MalMonroe Posts: 5,783
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    Why don't you also change your email details, password etc as well?

    I would say also report to Action Fraud but have recently heard that they're in a bit of a turmoil too. (Although still accepting reports of fraud, etc., apparently.)

    Also, do you think someone you know could be trying to wind you up? Just trying to look at things from all angles. . . 
    Please note - taken from the Forum Rules and amended for my own personal use (with thanks) : It is up to you to investigate, check, double-check and check yet again before you make any decisions or take any action based on any information you glean from any of my posts. Although I do carry out careful research before posting and never intend to mislead or supply out-of-date or incorrect information, please do not rely 100% on what you are reading. Verify everything in order to protect yourself as you are responsible for any action you consequently take.
  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] Posts: 0
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    edited 8 August 2021 at 4:04AM
    They don't have access to my email address, these sites can be signed up to without email verification (though I did change my email password just to be safe). If you search online you can see this has happened to lots of people so it's likely an organised scam involving hundreds or thousands of people's details. Action Fraud were completely useless when I tried to report it, which is what led me to think Gamstop might be the answer.
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