We've changed the name of this board from 'Greenfingered MoneySaving' to simply 'Gardening'. This is to help make it easier to find for the horticulturally inclined. The URL remains unchanged for the time being, so all links to the board are unaffected.

Creosote (the real thing!) for raised bed

elljay
elljay Posts: 1,010 Forumite
First Anniversary First Post
Thank you for  all your responses to my duck problem - had a good laugh!  This is more serious, I have some men at present building some raised beds in the garden.  They've done the flower one and are about to start on the veg one.  I went out to have a look, it looks very smart but the garden stinks of creosote which is exactly what they've been using - the showed me the container.  I asked them not to use it on the veg one (too late for the flower one) and they looked at me blankly.  I'm sure I'm right in thinking that it can leach into the soil and poison the veg.  Or am I being alarmist?  There must be a reason why it was banned years ago!  How long before I can plant?  How long before I can let the dog and cat out? 

Can anyone advise please?  Also I'll have to treat the veg bed myself now, can anyone recommend an alternative?

Thanks very much.  Liz
«13

Comments

  • roddydogs
    roddydogs Posts: 7,478 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary
    Thought it had be banned years ago.
  • clive0510
    clive0510 Posts: 812 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post
    I believe actual creosote is no longer sold in the shops. you can get something called creosote substitute. I  used to use ronseal one coat for my shed, but when that went rotten underneath, I knocked  it down and had a brick one built instead. so dont need it now. 
    As for the veg, I don't know whether it would harm it or not, I'm afraid.
  • elljay
    elljay Posts: 1,010 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post
    The guy is a farmer and builder, his son is an apprentice joiner and was looking for some projects to improve his skills so I thought I was doing a good thing by giving him this work.  Creosote is  still available for professional use according to what I've read.  Thanks.
  • Years ago my Grandad had a wooden framed  greenhouse. He creosoted it. The tomatoes he lovingly tended inside were inedible. They had absorbed the creosote leaching into the soil. He never did it again!
  • Hasbeen
    Hasbeen Posts: 4,404 Forumite
    First Anniversary Photogenic Name Dropper First Post
    edited 7 January 2021 at 6:36PM
    clive0510 said:
    I believe actual creosote is no longer sold in the shops. you can get something called creosote substitute. I  used to use ronseal one coat for my shed, but when that went rotten underneath, I knocked  it down and had a brick one built instead. so dont need it now. 
    As for the veg, I don't know whether it would harm it or not, I'm afraid.
    You can still order online:  TRADITIONAL CREOSOTE – Original, proper Coal Tar Creosote, supplied for FOR INDUSTRIAL / PROFESSIONAL AND FARM USE.

    So basically anyone can buy, as long as you tick the professional box etc, :D:wink:   but is in large containers

    Traditional Creosote – Creosote Sales
    The world is not ruined by the wickedness of the wicked, but by the weakness of the good. Napoleon
  • twopenny
    twopenny Posts: 5,509 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary Photogenic
    I love the smell of that stuff and used it on my shed.
    It did kill the plants it touched and sadly, my frog that I'd been so careful to cover his patch before painting and I was traumatised so would not use it now. No help to you.
    Is there soil already in the flower one? Or did they just paint the outside?
    From the plant point of view you could line the beds before putting the soil in even if you have to take it out, line and put it back in.
    I'd like to give you some good news but a search was alarming when it comes to plants or vegetables. I think you need to gen up on the facts and kindly say to them that the beds they've built can't be used because of the creosote and see where you go from there. Also take a close look at the containers and make quite sure it is pure creosote.
    Whatever possessed them?!  Both are professionals they should have known.
    As for the animals you need to wait until it's completely dry. Not easy in midwinter. But they will probably avoid it because of the smell.

    viral kindness .....kindness is contageous pass it on

    The only normal people you know are the ones you don’t know very well


  • trickydicky14
    trickydicky14 Posts: 947 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    edited 7 January 2021 at 10:47PM
    It's not good for the environment or insects and I would not want my veg growing in that.
    It may well do a good job on the wood but I would stay away from it.
    Lots of other products on the market.
    Just to add, industry and farms can often use in my mind bad stuff that is not on sale to the public.
    Just look at some of the bug killers used that end up killing bees and lots more.
    I choose the rooms that I live in with care,
    The windows are small and the walls almost bare,
    There's only one bed and there's only one prayer;
    I listen all night for your step on the stair.
  • Davesnave
    Davesnave Posts: 34,741 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Anniversary Photogenic First Post
    When did you last see a telegraph pole that had rotted at the base? For this reason, creosoted fence posts are coming back into favour with some farmers, but they're expensive and contractors hate handling them.
    Creosote is good stuff to use on chicken houses, but only if you have the ability to leave the treated one fallow for a long time and then only paint it on the outside. Inside, Creocote, still kills mites and the shed's safe to use in a few days.
    If your guys were true professionals, they would have used pressure treated timber for deep beds. Most people consider that safe and it doesn't need treatment. Frankly, 'safe' treatments in contact with the ground are a waste of money. My deep beds built with 150mmx25mm treated and 50mm square stakes have lasted 10 years and are still OK for a year or two more..
  • elljay
    elljay Posts: 1,010 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post
    Thank you everyone, it just confirms what I had read.  I've hardly slept worrying about this and haven't dared let the dog into the garden as although I can keep him away from the beds I've a feeling some has been spilt elsewhere - judging by the smell..  As soon as the snow melts a bit I'll go out and clear up what I can find. I'm torn between asking them to take the flower one away or finding some fabric to cover it with.  The problem is the people are near neighbours and have been very welcoming and friendly since I moved  here recently.

    There's no soil in them yet, that's for me to source.  Would normal weed suppressant fabric work or do I need something more substantial?

    Thanks again for all the advice.  Liz
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 343K Banking & Borrowing
  • 250.1K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 449.6K Spending & Discounts
  • 235.1K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 607.8K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 173K Life & Family
  • 247.8K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.9K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards