Wood prices

Hello all,

We have recently had a log burner fitted in our new home and wanted to stock up on fuel before the autumn arrives (and I assume prices increase with demand?) 

I have found a local supplier who has quoted £85 including delivery per cubic metre of wood. Does that sound about right price wise?  

And does anyone have any suggestions of how much we might use over the season? We are not people who overly feel the cold and would probably only use it on colder days for a few hours in the evening to heat our main living space. 
 
It’s a 5kw stove if that makes a difference? 

Many thanks for any help! 

Comments

  • Ectophile
    Ectophile Posts: 7,238
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    edited 29 August 2020 at 10:21AM
    If it's just top-up heating, then a cubic metre could last you for the winter.  That's about how much I go through.  But if it's going to be your main heating, then at least double that.  It all depends on how well insulated your home is.
    Where I live, I would expect something quite special for my £85, and not just a pile of slightly manky logs.  But I live in an area with a lot of woodland, so there are a lot of tree offcuts for people to get rid of.  I would expect to pay more like £65 for ordinary hardwood logs.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
  • @Ectophile  thank you for your response. I will see if I can compare with anyone else locally - we’re in a National Park so maybe felling is more regulated and they do say the logs are seasoned and they guarantee a low moisture level. 

    We have central heating too so this would be secondary and we would still use the heating to take the chill off elsewhere in the house. 
  • In a 7kw stove, using heating just to take the chill off the house and burning every evening from approx 6pm to 11pm I used to use about 3 cubic metres. 
  • dunstonh
    dunstonh Posts: 115,730
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    We have recently had a log burner fitted in our new home and wanted to stock up on fuel before the autumn arrives (and I assume prices increase with demand?)
    Generally, it doesn't increase in price in winter.  However, delivery times tend to drift due to demand.
    If it's just top-up heating, then a cubic metre could last you for the winter.
    It depends on the size of the house and how you use the heating.   We go through about 4-5 cubic meters from Autumn to Spring. (weather, of course, influencing it - indeed, we have had it only already this week which is unusal for this time of year).  And that is top up to central heating (which I refuse to put on at this time of year!)
    probably only use it on colder days for a few hours in the evening to heat our main living space.
    It will take an hour (possibly a tad more) to get to target heating.   You will probably find you light it up earlier so it is burning when you really need it.
    You can put the same stove in 5 different rooms and get totally different heating patterns and effectiveness.   Airflow can be key to how the heat moves around.    Until you use it, you won't know the effectiveness of the burner or how much you wood you are likely to go through.   A stove fan is a must for dispersing heat and creating airflow.
    I have found a local supplier who has quoted £85 including delivery per cubic metre of wood. Does that sound about right price wise? 
    What type of wood is it?  Hardwood? Softwood? Combination? 
    Is it kiln dried? Seasoned or wet (where you will need to season it yourself)?
    Prices vary around the country.   £85 is in the ballpark.  
    However, the quality of wood is important.   We got a batch of kiln-dried hardwood last year that was truly awful.   It just charcoaled up and failed to generate the usual levels of heat.    Whereas a decent supply of seasoned hardwood can give you longer burn and greater heat.    I wasn't overly impressed with the kiln dried before that bad batch.  I prefer seasoned.   However, you need to be wary when buying seasoned that you may need to add your own seasoning period to it as well.

    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). The comments I make are just my opinion and are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice and you should not treat them as such. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from an Independent Financial Adviser local to you.
  • Sorry thanks for everyone's responses - have just caught up on this!

    They offer seasoned hardwood with less that 20% moisture content (£90) or mixed firewood (£85).  

    Yes I guess we are on a bit of a learning curve at the moment - we currently have the original rotting and poorly fitting single glazing too so this will impact heat loss, but these are due to be replaced before the depths of winter so hopefully will improve!




  • Penguin_
    Penguin_ Posts: 1,192
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    Here in West Wales, I tend to pay £50 for a builders tonne bag of kiln dried wood.
  • Ectophile
    Ectophile Posts: 7,238
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    I mostly use scrounged wood these days, seasoned for 2 years.  When I used to buy in wood, I preferred to get it in the spring, and leave it in the wood store for a summer.  That way I would know it was properly seasoned.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
  • I made friends with a tree surgeon so I try and get what I can from him he asks for donations to local hospice so we happy with that this year I was a bit short so had to buy some local place had an offer on for larch wood split and dry builders bag £45 I also use smokeless coal 22kg £7.50 a bag
  • I've always used scrounged wood: I can hear the sound of a chainsaw over quite a distance! Neighbour builds his own furniture so lovely off-cuts from him too. In my reasonably insulated terrace I barely used my gas CH last year but there's only me to please, and I don't bother with heating upstairs. The 5kw stove heats the lounge after which I open the doors for wider benefit to the house. Pallets, the heat treated ones, are a useful and free source of kindling, along with blocks and planks for a quick burn.
    I keep a few packs of briquettes in the house for the wetter periods to get a good start to the fire, but wouldn't expect to use more than one 'log' and only occasionally.

  • Thanks everyone for their comments. We've ordered 1 cubic metre so far and will see how far that gets us.
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