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Medical certificate required

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Hi, I'm claiming on my travel insurance for a holiday curtailment. When I purchased the insurance last year I declared a medical condition. In fact, I had to pay extra for the insurance because of the condition. Now the company want me to prove that I suffer with this condition. Easy enough, my doctor will confirm it but there is a £50 charge for the medical certificate which the insurance company insist I am liable for. Does that sound right?
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  • JGB1955JGB1955 Forumite
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    How are you going to prove it otherwise?
    #36 Saving for Christmas 2020 - £1 a day challenge.... £379/366
  • edited 30 July at 5:09PM
    SandtreeSandtree Forumite
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    edited 30 July at 5:09PM
    Have they explained why they want to validate your declared medical condition? Was the medical emergency related to it?

    I am assuming it was related and they want to validate not that you have the condition but the screening questions in relation to it (eg when diagnosed, medication taken, any hospitalisations or similar type questions) to ensure its severity was the level you indicated.
  • Marvo5Marvo5 Forumite
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    Nothing like that actually. I have susceptibility to DVD, was hospitalised in 2016 in Australia when, believe it or not the same insurance company dealt with the resulting claim. Since which time I've had to pay extra (fair enough) for travel insurance. I'd been advised by a specialist to only fly short haul but when going round the world got stuck in Singapore due to the Covid19 crisis so with short flights ceasing (mine to the Maldives was cancelled), I couldn't get home other than by taking a 13hour+ flight. That was dangerous, I'm pretty sure the insurance company wouldn't have sanctioned it anyway so the claim relates to being stuck in Singapore for 6 weeks. The way I look at it, they want proof so surely they should pay for it? I could understand it (maybe) if they had asked for proof when I purchased the insurance but none was asked for.
  • rs65rs65 Forumite
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    Marvo5 said:
    Now the company want me to prove that I suffer with this condition.  
    Sounds like the condition is fundamental to the claim so asking for proof is correct.  Usually the cost incurred in presenting the claim is your cost.
  • SandtreeSandtree Forumite
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    So they are asking you to substantiate that your course of action was reasonable and that action was driven by the medical condition.

    Do you have a price comparison between the 6 weeks stay -v- the 13+ hour flight? I'm assuming the actions increased the overall cost?

    It is generally up to the claimant to substantiate their claim which in some cases may result in costs. In practice with personal lines insurance insurers may well take on some of those costs themselves (or even pay to disprove a claim) but its not always fully clear cut.

    Have you spoken to them to ask explicitly what they want? Simply a letter to say you've had a DVT before? That its the Drs expert opinion that it'd be unsafe to have taken the long haul flight?  If its the former then they reasonably should be able to be referred to information they hold on file given you've had a prior claim for the condition that was settled.
  • silvercarsilvercar Forumite, Board Guide
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    I'd been advised by a specialist to only fly short haul but when going round the world got stuck in Singapore due to the Covid19 crisis so with short flights ceasing (mine to the Maldives was cancelled), I couldn't get home other than by taking a 13hour+ flight. That was dangerous, I'm pretty sure the insurance company wouldn't have sanctioned it anyway so the claim relates to being stuck in Singapore for 6 weeks

    I suspect that the insurer would wanted to have been consulted at the point where you couldn't get short haul flights. They would have wanted some input into whether your stay in Singapore should have been open ended or whether you should have taken some medical advice at that point as to next steps. One of the solutions that the insurer may have looked at (and they do have medical advisors) would be for you to have a short course of blood thinners in order to reduce the risk of DVT and to travel in business class or higher in order to have more room and a flat bed. That may well have been a reasonable solution and less costly to the insurer.

    Out of curiosity, how would you have got home from the Maldives taking short haul flights only?

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  • Marvo5Marvo5 Forumite
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    Sorry, been so bust trying to sort this out.
    rs65: I haven't got a condition, I am susceptible to one. According to the specialist in Singapore, once you have had a case of DVT you've a 3 in 1 chance of getting it again. You have to remember that I declared the condition and had to pay extra (a lot) to be covered. They must have and weighed the risk up before giving me the additional cost and they themselves put no restriction of what I then did. It was my choice to go round the world in stages as advised by the specialist.

    Sandtree: I spoke to them while abroad, told them of the situation and was advised that I was still covered and that I shouldn't worry, it would all be sorted when I eventually returned. They want a medical certificate from my doctor, they have given him a questionnaire to fill in. However it was the specialists in Australia and Singapore that advised safe flight lengths. In fact I consulted a doctor in Singapore and he said he wasn't qualified enough to make a decision about traveling home on a long flight and he arranged for me to see a specialist. In 2016 when I had DVT the same insurance company wouldn't allow be to return until the specialist said it was safe and when I did they flew me back first class at some considerable expence to themselves.

    silvercar: I spoke to them while in Singapore, to be honest they didn't really want to get involved, they had so many cases to deal with, you literally waited hours on the phone. The medical team would ONLY talk to you if you had a medical emergency. I wasn't in that position.
    As for our scheduled flights home, Singapore to Maldives, Maldives to Dubai, Dubai to Athens, Athens to London.


  • silvercarsilvercar Forumite, Board Guide
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    I suspect you or the insurers need to get hold of a report by the specialist you saw, or persuade the insurers to see what their own medical advisors say.
    I have heard of a 5 hour rule, where those at risk of DVT should only take flights of less than 5 hours, Dubai to Athens is a tad over that, but I suppose they needed to be pragmatic.
    I'm a Board Guide on the Debate House Prices & the Economy, House Buying, Renting & Selling, Mortgages and Endowments, In My Home incl DIY, Overseas Holidays & Student boards.
    I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly.
    Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an abusive or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. Any views are mine and not the official line of moneysavingexpert.com.
  • SandtreeSandtree Forumite
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    Have you spoken to your GP? Do you have a good relationship with them?

    if I were in your shoes I’d be much more worried about the GP’s answers than the £50 fee
  • Marvo5Marvo5 Forumite
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    silvercar said:
    I suspect you or the insurers need to get hold of a report by the specialist you saw, or persuade the insurers to see what their own medical advisors say.
    I have heard of a 5 hour rule, where those at risk of DVT should only take flights of less than 5 hours, Dubai to Athens is a tad over that, but I suppose they needed to be pragmatic.

    The insurers already have the specialists report and recommendations. The Australian (and my doctor) recommended flights of no more than 6 hours. The Singapore specialist said 4hr 30m.
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