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Dogs attacking a dog on lead when out walking.

edited 12 July at 7:32PM in Pets & Pet Care
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Kim_kimKim_kim Forumite
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edited 12 July at 7:32PM in Pets & Pet Care
My daughter bought a British bulldog 3 months ago, he still has his bits, she plans to get them snipped - he’s one year old. 
When they are out in public areas she keeps him on the lead (He’s not nasty).  Three times in three months he’s been attacked on the lead by dogs off the lead being walked.  The first time he didn’t fight back, the second he did a bit, today he did some more.  Today was two labradors so big dogs.
She saw them approach, she stood to one side of the pathway (It wasn’t narrow) & made her dog sit.  They didn’t attempt to put their dogs on the lead, one came bounding up & run off, the other came bounding up and attacked.  
She is worried he will get aggressive with other dogs out of fear of them.  He is very nice mannered, he takes a fair bit of stick from the cat in good humour!
I suggested she gets a lead that’s stamped warning vicious dog - it might make others keep their dogs away.  I know at least two of the occasions were in different parks, not sure about the third.  I have told her not to go back to parks where it happens, but at this rate she will run out!
When she gets him neutered will that help?

Any other tips?
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  • tacpot12tacpot12 Forumite
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    She needs to take a walking stick with her and shout to other dog walkers to keep their pets away. She can use the stick to hit the dogs if they come too close. It's not fair on your sister's dog to have to risk being attacked because other people won't control their dogs. I'm inclined to think that neutering will help, but the basic issue is big dogs that have not had their aggression tamed out of them. 
    The comments I post are my personal opinion. While I try to check everything is correct before posting, I can and do make mistakes, so always check official information sources before relying on my posts.
  • duncanthedogduncanthedog Forumite
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    She needs to report the other dogs to the dog warden, you can get the number from the local council website.

    Neutering might help keep other dogs from attacking but don't count on it, that was certainly not the case with me and losing my bits made me even more of a coward than I already was, I now have 'small dog syndrome' meaning that I go on the defensive with any dog that is bigger than me and start barking as soon as they get close.
  • Kim_kimKim_kim Forumite
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    She needs to report the other dogs to the dog warden, you can get the number from the local council website.

    Neutering might help keep other dogs from attacking but don't count on it, that was certainly not the case with me and losing my bits made me even more of a coward than I already was, I now have 'small dog syndrome' meaning that I go on the defensive with any dog that is bigger than me and start barking as soon as they get close.
    Thing is they know they shouldn’t have a dog out of control in a public area, so they won’t hang about and give their details. 

  • Kim_kimKim_kim Forumite
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    tacpot12 said:
    She needs to take a walking stick with her and shout to other dog walkers to keep their pets away. She can use the stick to hit the dogs if they come too close. It's not fair on your sister's dog to have to risk being attacked because other people won't control their dogs. I'm inclined to think that neutering will help, but the basic issue is big dogs that have not had their aggression tamed out of them. 
    That is a great idea and I’m embarrassed I didn’t think of it! 
  • sherambersheramber Forumite
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    Can she video  them on her mobile phone? If she give a description the dog warden can look out for them by visiting the park. If others have reported  the dog too it helps as the more complaints, the more likely they will take action. 

    Dogs who are on the lead feel vulnerable to a loose   dog approaching them in an inappropriate manner. Labs are very guilty of this due to their  bouncy, outgoing  nature ( my dog's temperament  was ruined after being mugged on three separate occasions by over friendly labs) As a result the onlead can give off body signals or even a low growl that escalates the situation.  This is , in no way, blaming your daughter's dog. It is just to explain why the situation may arise.The fault is squarely with the owner of the out of control dog. We have several who walk along engrossed in their mobile phones with no idea where their dog is or what it is doing. 
    There are tactics she can try,   
    Teach her dog to go behind her on cue. When she sees  a threat of something happening then she cues the dog to go behind her. This tells her dog that she is taking control of the situation and creates a barrier between her dog and the other one.

    Carry several small treats and fling a handful down on the ground away from her dog.  The approaching dog will probably go for the teats and she move away while it is distracted. If the other objects then tell them thy should have their dog under control.

     Carry a pop up umbrella and raise it in front of the approaching dog. The shock of this happening can stop the approaching dog and again make a barrier. But she must  get her own dog used to the umbrella popping open ( pair it  with getting a treat) so that it doesn't  frighten him

    She can shout to the owner( if they are around) that her dog has very contagious skin condition so can they keep their dog away.

    I did scare  off  a cavalier King Charles spaniel , which pestered my dog - and others- every day,  by stepping forward forcefully and growling at it. It stopped dead and turned a fled back to its owner with its tail tucked under.  From that day when the owner saw me in the field with my ( scary) dog , who was otherwise occupied and unaware of what had happened, he put it on the lead. 

    Please be very cautious   about neutering him. Testosterone  is what gives courage and if a dog is timid/nervous at all then removing the testosterone will make him worse. Neutering him will not necessarily make things better because a  neutered dog can  be pestered by entire dogs who think he is a female as he does not give off a 'dog' smell. If her dog is not showing signs of being sexually active then do not rush into anything.
    Read up online on the pros and cons of neutering and make your own informed decision. 
    Personally I am not in favour of early neutering . I think  they need their hormones to mature properly and would try to wait until he was at least 2 years old. 
    Try and let him meet friendly dogs under control to give him confidence  about dogs approaching him. Training classes, which use positive, reward  based methods,   are good for that.
  • edited 12 July at 10:03PM
    Kim_kimKim_kim Forumite
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    edited 12 July at 10:03PM
    Thank you sheramber for all the advice and suggestions, sorry if I wasn’t clear, it’s always different dogs, never the same one(s).
    Yes he does get to play with friendly dogs & loves it.  He wants to play with the cat, but the cats not having it.
    He does need neutering, he humps my grandsons leg sometimes, so he needs fixing.
  • onwards&upwardsonwards&upwards Forumite
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    Are they really attacking?  Or is your sister overreacting to over excitable dog greetings?  Only because 3 separate attacks in 3 months seems highly unlikely.  I've had dogs all my life and none of them have ever been attacked by other dogs.  I'm not saying it doesn't happen but its not this common! 
  • Kim_kimKim_kim Forumite
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    Are they really attacking?  Or is your sister overreacting to over excitable dog greetings?  Only because 3 separate attacks in 3 months seems highly unlikely.  I've had dogs all my life and none of them have ever been attacked by other dogs.  I'm not saying it doesn't happen but its not this common! 
    He’s been bitten and had blood drawn on one of them, it’s definitely fighting.  
    She’s stunned, 3 in 3 months.  
  • KatiehoundKatiehound Forumite
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    One thing I would have is a small pop bottle (hopefully with a nozzle rather than a lid) full of water in a pocket. If any offending dog comes up all they get is a surprise squirt in the face. I would also shout at the dog  &/or owner to get away.
    Other than that go to dog training classes and get tips there, and let him meet friendly dogs.

    Humping other dogs isn't always sexual- its a dominance thing
    Being polite and pleasant doesn't cost anything!
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  • Kim_kimKim_kim Forumite
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    One thing I would have is a small pop bottle (hopefully with a nozzle rather than a lid) full of water in a pocket. If any offending dog comes up all they get is a surprise squirt in the face. I would also shout at the dog  &/or owner to get away.
    Other than that go to dog training classes and get tips there, and let him meet friendly dogs.

    Humping other dogs isn't always sexual- its a dominance thing
    He’s not humping dogs, he’s humping my 9 year old grandsons leg! 
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