Does Annex require separate Council Tax?

Does not seem to be a planning board on MSE so this does not fit anywhere properly.  
When you apply for planning permission to create an annex on the property either physically attached to the main house or totally separate within the main house curtillage.  
You don't have to register it as a separate dwelling for council tax ..do you ?
Thanks

Replies

  • edited 30 June 2020 at 7:16PM
    Sibbers123Sibbers123 Forumite
    318 Posts
    100 Posts Second Anniversary
    ✭✭
    edited 30 June 2020 at 7:16PM
    No. It’s an annex, it is not a separate dwelling.

    It may mean your council tax band increases however.
  • edited 30 June 2020 at 8:24PM
    greatcrestedgreatcrested Forumite
    5.9K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    edited 30 June 2020 at 8:24PM
    If it is self-contained it is likely to be assessed seperately for council tax purposes.
    Though if it is used only by family members (eg granny annexe) that may not be the case.
    (Please don't tell my council about my annexe though........)
    See



  • edited 1 July 2020 at 12:05PM
    CISCIS Forumite
    12.1K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited 1 July 2020 at 12:05PM
    A part of a property that is capable of being as, or is used for, a distinct unit of occupation can be banded for council tax purposes whether or not you try to call it an annexe, an extension or a garden shed. The actual situation has to be looked at (and can change over time).
    For council tax purposes there's two different issues at play here - 1) whether it forms a dwelling that should be banded for council tax and 2) whether or not it is an annexe under council tax legislation and eligible for any discounts/exemptions.

    I no longer work in Council Tax Recovery but instead work as a specialist Council Tax paralegal assisting landlords and Council Tax payers with council tax disputes and valuation tribunals. My views are my own reading of the law and you should always check with the local authority in question.
  • jolou75jolou75 Forumite
    1 Post
    First Post
    MoneySaving Newbie
    until he until he moved in with me last year, my partner rented a self-contained annex in the grounds of a private property for nine years. His tenancy agreement stated that his rental payment covered all utilities including council tax. The whole property has now been sold and the new owner is having problems letting out the annex as it appears it had not been registered as an independent property. As I informed the council that my partner had moved in with me, including details of his previous address, he has now been sent a bill for almost £9k for council tax arrears on the property he rented and have told him he is legally liable as he was the occupier of the property, despite him telling the council that the payments were covered in his rent, as stated in his tenancy agreement. Clearly the landlord has been dishonest about the status of the property but where do we stand legally? Thank you for any advice.
  • SlitherySlithery Forumite
    4.2K Posts
    Seventh Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭
    jolou75 said:
    until he until he moved in with me last year, my partner rented a self-contained annex in the grounds of a private property for nine years. His tenancy agreement stated that his rental payment covered all utilities including council tax. The whole property has now been sold and the new owner is having problems letting out the annex as it appears it had not been registered as an independent property. As I informed the council that my partner had moved in with me, including details of his previous address, he has now been sent a bill for almost £9k for council tax arrears on the property he rented and have told him he is legally liable as he was the occupier of the property, despite him telling the council that the payments were covered in his rent, as stated in his tenancy agreement. Clearly the landlord has been dishonest about the status of the property but where do we stand legally? Thank you for any advice.
    Pay the £9k to the council as yes, he is liable. He then takes the landlord to small claims court to get back the £9k using the tenancy agreement as proof.
  • edited 1 July 2020 at 2:31PM
    greatcrestedgreatcrested Forumite
    5.9K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    edited 1 July 2020 at 2:31PM
    Council Tax liability follows a strict hierarchy. It is not affected by any contractual arrangements eg between occupier and landlord. So yes, the council will chase him for payment, via the courts if he does not pay.
    As slithery says, it is then a case of breach of contract by his landlord which he can pursue via the courts seperately.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Latest MSE News and Guides

Energy price cap could be extended beyond 2023

New plans have just been announced by the Government

MSE News

Cheap contents insurance for tenants

DON'T assume your landlord covers you

MSE Guides

Summer sizzlers round-up

Incl £2ish sun cream & £1.50 disposable BBQs

MSE Deals