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What engine oil do I need?

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What engine oil do I need?

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shoutshoutshoutshout Forumite
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Hi everyone,
I was trying to find engine oil to buy online, but admittedly I got a bit lost. My car manual says I need to go for VW 507 00. When I entered my reg online, it offered me these two:
Shell Helix HX8 ECT 5W-30 - 5Ltr - https://www.carparts4less.co.uk/p/shell-helix-hx8-ect-5w-30-5ltr-521773591
Shell Helix HX8 ECT 5W-40 - 5Ltr - https://www.carparts4less.co.uk/p/shell-helix-hx8-ect-5w-40-5ltr-521773571
What I could find from search is that 5w-30 is for "younger" engines and 5w-40 is for "high mileage". I have 126k miles, so I'm assuming I should go for 5w-40? The other one is twice the price, which I'm willing to pay if it's actually better for my car, but I just don't know anything about these things.
However, even though I entered my reg on the page, neither of those two list 507.00 under Product Details, making me unsure if it is even the right oil for my car.

Following details are from the car papers, if it helps:
Car sales model 8PABHD
BLS engine
KBL gearbox
A3 Spb TDIe 1.9 R4 77 DPF
Model year 2010

If anyone can shed a light on what oil would be the best for my car, I would be forever grateful! Thanks in advance!
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Replies

  • AdrianCAdrianC Forumite
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    5w40 is a little bit thicker than 5w30 when it's hot. That's why they say "for high mileage engines" - the extra thickness can compensate for internal wear, if you're having problems with the oil pressure light coming on at hot idle.

    507.00 is just one of VW's approvals, it doesn't specify any particular oil in and of itself. Your manual will also state a viscosity.

    Putting your car details into a specialist oil supplier's search comes back with just 5w30.
    https://www.opieoils.co.uk/f/2354/18398/2010/engine-oil.aspx
  • oh_reallyoh_really Forumite
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    Castro Edge meets your requirements. Costco sometimes have it on offer.

  • cymruchriscymruchris Forumite
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    For a ten year old car with over 100k on the clock, I would use a decent quality oil, and change it often, but not the leading edge technology oils. The 5w40 helix at just over £20 for 5 litres looks to do the job. 
    An ex-bankrupt on a journey of recovery. Feel free to send me a DM reference credit building credit cards from the usual suspects :) Happy to help others going through what I've been through!
  • AdrianCAdrianC Forumite
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    For a ten year old car with over 100k on the clock, I would use a decent quality oil, and change it often, but not the leading edge technology oils. The 5w40 helix at just over £20 for 5 litres looks to do the job. 
    Apart from the minor detail that he needs 5w30, not 5w40.
  • cymruchriscymruchris Forumite
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    AdrianC said:
    For a ten year old car with over 100k on the clock, I would use a decent quality oil, and change it often, but not the leading edge technology oils. The 5w40 helix at just over £20 for 5 litres looks to do the job. 
    Apart from the minor detail that he needs 5w30, not 5w40.
    For an engine of that age and mileage - it's not going to make a jot of difference. The more important factor is to change it regularly. The viscosity of the oil recommended changes all over the world depending on what climate you happen to live in - so you could argue that someone in Aberdeen needs a thinner oil than someone living in Brighton, as it's much colder up there in the winter. 
    An ex-bankrupt on a journey of recovery. Feel free to send me a DM reference credit building credit cards from the usual suspects :) Happy to help others going through what I've been through!
  • AdrianCAdrianC Forumite
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    Isn't it? I don't know those VAG engines specifically, but I do know a lot of modern(ish) engines that require thin(ish) viscosities like 0w30 and 5w30 can have issues quite rapidly if you start putting thicker stuff in.

    Multigrade oil viscosity is rated at 0degC and 100degC. 5w30 and 5w40 are the same at 0degC, the same as a straight 5-weight oil at 0degC. But at 100degC, the 5w40 is the same as a straight 40 at 100degC, the 5w30 as a straight 30. Ambient temp differences aren't that relevant compared to the internal working temperatures.
  • KimJongUn88KimJongUn88 Forumite
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    AdrianC said:
    5w40 is a little bit thicker than 5w30 when it's hot. That's why they say "for high mileage engines" - the extra thickness can compensate for internal wear, if you're having problems with the oil pressure light coming on at hot idle.

    507.00 is just one of VW's approvals, it doesn't specify any particular oil in and of itself. Your manual will also state a viscosity.

    Putting your car details into a specialist oil supplier's search comes back with just 5w30.
    https://www.opieoils.co.uk/f/2354/18398/2010/engine-oil.aspx
    I think you’re wrong. 5w30 is the thicker of the two oils, not the 5w40.

    Anyway, OP search for your local TPS. They’re a wholly owned subsidiary of VAG who sell parts to the trade. Have a look at Quantum LongLife III oil. It’s 507 approved and can be had for decent money.
  • edited 30 May at 12:32PM
    MinuteNoodlesMinuteNoodles Forumite
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    edited 30 May at 12:32PM
    AdrianC said:
    5w40 is a little bit thicker than 5w30 when it's hot. That's why they say "for high mileage engines" - the extra thickness can compensate for internal wear, if you're having problems with the oil pressure light coming on at hot idle.
    Sorry but that's just plain wrong. Thicker oil DOES NOT AND NEVER WILL compensate for internal wear. In fact what thicker oil actually does is increase the rate of wear. When you've got problems that bad the oil pump is usually not that healthy either. Thicker oil takes longer to pump around an engine when you start it so that means that if your car has been stood for several hours then using this stupid advice your engine, especially the top end of it, will spend more time running without any oil getting to it as the pump tries to shove the thicker oil through it than it would with thinner oil. This means even more premature wearing of things like your camshaft.
  • MinuteNoodlesMinuteNoodles Forumite
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    I think you’re wrong. 5w30 is the thicker of the two oils, not the 5w40.
    The wXX figure refers to its viscosity when it's hot, to be specific, it's viscosity at 100C. W40 has a higher viscosity than W30 at 100C. If you're in a warmer country you want W40 or W50. Go to the south of France for example and you'll find it almost impossible to find W30 oil on the shelves.

  • edited 30 May at 1:29PM
    oh_reallyoh_really Forumite
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    edited 30 May at 1:29PM
    I suspect there may be some mis-information re viscosity creeping in..
    [quote]The smaller the number, the better it will flow. So a 5W-30 will flow easier than a 10W-30 at start-up temperatures and a 10W-30 will flow easier than a 10W-40 at normal engine operating temperatures.[/quote] source castrol.

    Op bear in mind, in addition you should ensure the oil you choose should have a low sulphated ash spec SAPS.
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