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Do I have to give defendant my bank details?

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Do I have to give defendant my bank details?

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Wasn't sure which category to put this in, but here goes.
I have just won a small claims case against someone who hit my car causing £700 worth of damage, leaving me to foot the bill after duping me into agreeing to sort it without going through insurance. Finding out later that was because he actually had no Ins/tax/m.o.t. 
He promised to foot the bill at the garage where repairs were done but did not so muggins had to pay otherwise I couldnt get to work. 
I took it to small claims court and got the judgement. £60 a month he has to pay. Got 1st payment from him via postal order along with a letter asking for my bank details to make future payments easier for HIM. . I am not willing to do this for 2 reasons - not willing to make his life easier after putting me through what he did, also not willing to give my bank details out to some randm bloke who has showed himself to be dishonest.
Does anybody know where I would stand on this, demanding that I be paid via postal order or cheque etc? Surely that is my right?
Thanks
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  • edited 23 April at 10:45AM
    FarwayFarway Forumite
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    edited 23 April at 10:45AM
    Cherry.N said:
    Does anybody know where I would stand on this, demanding that I be paid via postal order or cheque etc? Surely that is my right?
    Thanks
    I doubt it is your "right" to demand how it is paid, as long as it is
    Do you have savings accounts linked to your current account?
    If so give him the sort code & account number of the savings account as savings account IME will only transfer to the linked current account of which he will have no knowledge
    As a further precaution, if the option exists, set up a specific linked savings account with just an opening quid in it

  • edited 23 April at 10:52AM
    bradders1983bradders1983 Forumite
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    edited 23 April at 10:52AM
    Other than fraudently set up a Direct Debit, which you can easily cancel and get a refund back under the DD Guarantee, what do you think they will be able to do with your sort code and account number?

    Also why should they spend an extra 10% (?) buying postal orders?

    As an aside, if they send you a cheque then you have THEIR sort code and account number at the bottom of it. Just pointing out the potential hypocrisy here ;)
  • Cherry.NCherry.N Forumite
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    Why should he spend an extra 10% buying postal orders? The potential hypocrisy?
    You're having a laugh, surely? This dishonest person has put me out of pocket by £700 for something he admitted to causing. As a low paid care worker, I did not have that kind of £ to hand, so had to pay the bill on a credit card, on which there is obviously interest to pay by yours truly. I owe that man nothing, if he has 10% extra to pay to send me a p.order, considering he had (and still has) no tax/ins/m.o.t, he has got off light. Police were informed but . Ahh, unable to do anything about it.
    I don't suspect he is able to do anything with my bank details, I am digging my heels in because I do not have to do him a favour. He has caused me untold stress and left me feeling a fool after giving him the benefit of the doubt when he caused the damage and promised to pay for it. I was relying on him having the same morals as I have. Yep, silly.
    Thanks for the reply.
  • edited 23 April at 12:43PM
    bradders1983bradders1983 Forumite
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    edited 23 April at 12:43PM
    Ok, I looked the amount up, it isnt 10%. Fair enough. It is actually MORE than that if he is only buying £60 at a time, it is 12.5%  You didnt think buying postal orders just cost the face value, surely?

    Just swallow your pride and give him the details of a savings account you can set up attached to your current account, as already mentioned. Direct Debits cant be set up from these. If you make it difficult then the plaintiff could easily go back to the court and say you are refusing a payment.


  • p00hsticksp00hsticks Forumite
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    Cherry.N said:
    I don't suspect he is able to do anything with my bank details, I am digging my heels in because I do not have to do him a favour. He has caused me untold stress and left me feeling a fool after giving him the benefit of the doubt when he caused the damage and promised to pay for it. I was relying on him having the same morals as I have. Yep, silly.
    Thanks for the reply.

    The thing is, I suspect you may be 'cutting off your nose to spite your face' here.
    The more difficult you make it for him to pay you, the less likely you are to get the money.....
    By refusing to give him your bank details you're giving him an excuse to delay / stop paying you.
  • Cherry.NCherry.N Forumite
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    Nope, didn't think buying postal orders just cost the face value, knew it cost on top. But should I care? No. I didn't request he paid that way, it's just how the 1st payment turned up.
    Good point though re him saying I'm refusing payment. Guess I will have to have a rethink. It seems the law is rarely on the side of the victim. Don't think anyone could blame me though for wanting just a tiny say in something that I didn't bring on myself.
  • bradders1983bradders1983 Forumite
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    The judgement wont state that you get to choose the method of payment. If he is offering you a bank transfer you cant really say no. No cost to him, no faff to you in cashing cheques or postal orders.
  • zagubovzagubov Forumite
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    Just hope he doesn't cough on the cheque, P.O. and/or the envelope.
    You want the payment virtually not physically in this day and age, anything else will be a faff.
    There is no honour to be had in not knowing a thing that can be known - Danny Baker
  • bradders1983bradders1983 Forumite
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    Hadnt even thought of that aspect of it. Good point. 
  • Cherry.NCherry.N Forumite
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    The judgement didn't state that he gets to choose the method of payment either, it just said do not send cash through the post unless registered. 
    You not currently opening your mail then? 
    Think I will decide what's a faff for myself, but thanks for input.
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