New Post Advanced Search

Coronavirus: The latest from MSE


The MSE team is working extremely hard to keep the info we have about your travel rights, cancellation rights, sick pay (and more) up to date.
The official MSE guides: NEW MSE Coronavirus Guides

NEWSFLASH
FOREIGN OFFICE TRAVEL ADVICE * FURLOUGH UPDATE * MORTGAGE LENDING

Care Costs - How Much???!!!

73 replies 4K views
A friend's mother has recently had to move into a care home.  very sad but all too common etc etc.  But what has astounded me is that it is costing £1200/week!.  I don't know the full details but that's not really relevant to my question . . . which is, has anyone here any experience of home care alternatives, because it seems to me that at if care homes are charging 40, 50, 60k per year it must surely be cheaper to employ a full-time home carer.  Indeed, many retired people have spare bedrooms in their homes so why not even a live-in carer?  Perhaps this is what we used to call a 'housekeeper' in the good old days?  They get somewhere to live, rent-free, plus a 'living allowance' and they run the household for the elderly owner.  OK, maybe not so appropriate if there are serious medical conditions, but for basic old-age frailty it must surely be an option.  After all, I don't think there was the prevalence of care homes in the 'good old days' - or perhaps 'extended families' were more the norm back then?  - but they certainly seem to be raking in the profits these days.  Is there really no alternative?
«1345678

Replies

  • noclafnoclaf Forumite
    268 posts
    Sixth Anniversary 100 Posts
    ✭✭
    Unfortunately this is how it is now especially as many 'residential' homes have been shut down to cut costs. The nursing homes especially are usually charging in the region of £800-£2000 per week depending on the level of care someone receives and yes the figures are eye watering. In-house care is done and something I do for one parent but have carers coming in daily. Other parent is in a nursing home. Home care sounds great but I can tell you from firsthand experience is not easy. 
  • edited 20 February at 6:56PM
    onwards&upwardsonwards&upwards Forumite
    2.2K posts
    1,000 Posts Name Dropper First Anniversary
    ✭✭✭✭
    edited 20 February at 6:56PM
    Will the live in carer be working 24 hours a day?  
  • Mickey666Mickey666 Forumite
    161 posts
    100 Posts
    £2000 per week??!!  £100k+ per year!!!  How many care nurses could be employed for that sort of money?
    I'm not suggesting Home care is easy or that their children should provide the care, that's why help is needed, I'm just questioning the economics.  I'd much rather have a live-in 'housekeeper' run the house, cook my meals, do the shopping, change my bed etc etc and I'm sure it would be a far less costly way of providing 24hour basic care. Plus, they get their meals and accomodation paid for, so it could be a win-win situation if the right combination could be found.  Perhaps there are agencies that specialise in finding such people?  A bit like finding a live-in Nanny in a way.  If additional medical care was needed then that could be on a 'drop-in' daytime basis.  I'm just really surprised there's not much discussion about the other options to a £100k/year care home!
  • lisyloolisyloo Forumite
    26.4K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    My MIL (for whom I'm deputy) is paying £925 per week residential (plus £160 funded nursing care which she doesn't pay).
    That is an average home in Bristol i.e. there are cheaper ones (which are dreadful) and more expensive ones that are lovely.
    Homes in London and the SE are more expensive and up north they are cheaper.
    My MIL requires assistance of 2 carers as do many immobile people who are being hoisted and sometimes those with a zimmer.
    The bathroom in the homes are huge for a wheelchair, hoist, client plus 2 carers to get in.
    Also one carer simply cannot work 24/7 and the homes do have staff on at night (sometimes not sleeping).
    I guess it depends on the persons needs but assistance of 2 is a major issue.
    The advantage of having nursing care 24/7 is that simply issues (like UTIs) can be picked up and treated immediately so this may be in the client's best interests even if they aren't sick? Immobility and incontinence are issues that can make frail people sick e.g. UTIs, so they don't need to have acute conditions to qualify for nursing care.
    Obviously circumstances may vary, but there are advantages to being in home with entertainment, activities, trips and facilites e.g. dining room, if able to enjoy them.
  • lisyloolisyloo Forumite
    26.4K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Also note that you can buy an annuity to fix costs.
    For example for my MIL this would have been approx £100K female at age 91 (it's indivdually medically underwritten).
    This means you pay a fixed fee to get care forever. Obviously insurance comapnies aren't charities so it's biased towards profit as with any insurance, but it's an option to reduce the risk (at a cost of course).
    We didn't go for it because we though my MIL would not live that long (she's currently proving us wrong) but such a financial product MAY suit some people.
  • Mickey666Mickey666 Forumite
    161 posts
    100 Posts
    Will the live in carer be working 24 hours a day?  
    Presumably, but not in the conventional way.  I'm thinking old-fashioned 'housekeeper', doing what's needed to run the house as if it were their own home.  Indeed the house would also be their home as well so it's not like a typical 'job'.  When they cook a meal they cook for two instead of just themselves - is that 'work' in the conventional sense?  It's more like house sharing but with one party doing all the housework and getting paid for it, as well as living rent-free.  A typical care home worker goes to work for 8 hours but also has a home of their own to run, own meals to cook, own washing to do, own cleaning to do, etc etc.  How much extra effort is there in cooking for two rather than one?  Or having a full load of washing rather than a half load?

  • MojisolaMojisola Forumite
    33.1K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Mickey666 said:
    A friend's mother has recently had to move into a care home.  very sad but all too common etc etc.  But what has astounded me is that it is costing £1200/week!. 
    it must surely be cheaper to employ a full-time home carer.  Indeed, many retired people have spare bedrooms in their homes so why not even a live-in carer? 

    For most people, the problem with a live-in carer is paying for them.  Many people in residential care are funding the cost by selling their house.  If they are going to stay in the house, where do they find the money to pay their carer?
    There are companies who arrange for live-in carers - I looked into them for my parents - but they are very expensive.
  • LilElvisLilElvis Forumite
    5.4K posts
    Sixth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭
    Mojisola said:
    Mickey666 said:
    A friend's mother has recently had to move into a care home.  very sad but all too common etc etc.  But what has astounded me is that it is costing £1200/week!. 
    it must surely be cheaper to employ a full-time home carer.  Indeed, many retired people have spare bedrooms in their homes so why not even a live-in carer? 

    For most people, the problem with a live-in carer is paying for them.  Many people in residential care are funding the cost by selling their house.  If they are going to stay in the house, where do they find the money to pay their carer?
    There are companies who arrange for live-in carers - I looked into them for my parents - but they are very expensive.
    This is very true. One of my MIL's neighbours had a live in carer for a number of years, but he eventually went into a nursing home when his medical needs became more complex and his mental faculties were declining. I enquired about 24 hour care from the agency the neighbour used and found the cost to be pretty close to that of a nursing home. We've personally signed guarantor forms for the nursing home my MIL had chosen for when she feels she can no longer cope at home and that was for £237,000 to cover the lowest level of care for 4 years, though the costs can rise to £7,400 per month for dementia care. Fortunately my MIL's flat and her income would more than cover her for every eventuality so we needn't worry about being asked to cover the costs.
  • edited 20 February at 7:52PM
    lisyloolisyloo Forumite
    26.4K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited 20 February at 7:52PM
    They could do equity release but there is a cost to that.
    if you are in a care home you have no bills once you’ve sold your house
    the description of cooking/cleaning (which could be done by cook/cleaner) is very different to people doing hoisting, toileting, washing, dressing, feeding, taking responsibility for medication etc.
    some people are not safe to be left on their own at all
    a live in carer is an option for someone who might recover from an illness but sometimes people get to an age or have a condition where they will not improve.
    it might be an option for someone with a mentally capable partner who can take responsibility but is not able to do all the jobs, but you’d still need the money outside of property
Sign In or Register to comment.

Quick links

Essential Money | Who & Where are you? | Work & Benefits | Household and travel | Shopping & Freebies | About MSE | The MoneySavers Arms | Covid-19 & Coronavirus Support