Forum Home» Debate House Prices & the Economy

Ireland population boom post Brexit? - Page 2

New Post Advanced Search
Important update! We have recently reviewed and updated our Forum Rules and FAQs. Please take the time to familiarise yourself with the latest version.

Debate House Prices


We’re struggling at the moment with the huge volumes of messages we’re getting from Forumites about coronavirus and the impact it’s having on their finances. We’re a small team and we’re doing our best to manage this spike in demand. As a result, we’ve reluctantly decided to temporarily close the Debate House Prices & the Economy Board so that we can redirect our limited resources to those who need us most at this time.

Please do not post content intended for this board elsewhere in the forum – we appreciate your help and understanding during this exceptionally difficult time. It goes without saying, we hope to get back to full business as soon as possible!

Ireland population boom post Brexit?

30 replies 587 views
2

Replies

  • MiserlyMartinMiserlyMartin Forumite
    2K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭
    kinger101 wrote: »
    Why would an EU national want to move to a country simply because the first language is English?

    People's mobility is usually tied to work. In any event, you can get by in English in many European countries. And other nationalities tend to be better at second languages than us.


    Depends on where. You try getting a job (apart from in tourist things) in Spain without speaking Spanish.
  • lisyloolisyloo Forumite
    26.7K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Malta and Spain have high unemployment especially youth unemployment.
    Surely if the priority if job seeking then you’d go somewhere with good opportunities, decent pay (relative to other countries) and low unemployment. Up until recently the Uk ticked all the boxes.
    That changed a bit when sterling fell and there was a marked reduction in Eu immigration.
  • TromkingTromking Forumite
    2.7K posts
    Eighth Anniversary
    ✭✭✭✭
    The continuance of the Common Travel Area between Ireland and the U.K. post Brexit is going to make the adoption of an Irish passport quite popular with other EU citizens going forward I reckon. Live and work in Ireland for a bit and all those U.K. in work benefits and the free healthcare is there for you to access again. A loophole that will need close monitoring.
    “Britain- A friend to all, beholden to none”. 🇬🇧
  • peachypricepeachyprice Forumite
    22.3K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    GreatApe wrote: »
    If an EU national wants to move to an English speaking country most moved to England

    Post Brexit their only option is Ireland

    Could Ireland see EU migration levels spike post Brexit can they cope?

    The UK accepting 100,000 a year is one thing, a country 1/14th the size accepting 100,000 is totally a different scale

    Go long Irish property!!


    This may even be a back door way for EU nationals to come to the UK especially if Ireland decides to give Irish citizenship to their EU migrants sooner rather than later. Current it's 5 years residency it could well be reduced to 1 year if they find it difficult to deal with huge numbers (relative to their small population)

    As Ireland has the Euro it is no more attractive than any other EU country. They didn't come for our language, they came for our exchange rate.
    Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence and face your future without fear
  • movilogomovilogo Forumite
    2.9K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭
    Ireland is no march for UK. Dublin shopping complex is smaller than even compared to Milton Keynes. If we take London out of equation, Ireland cost of living is higher than UK’s in general. It is no heaven.
    Happiness is buying an item and then not checking its price after a month to discover it was reduced further.
  • Important update! We have recently reviewed and updated our Forum Rules and FAQs. Please take the time to familiarise yourself with the latest version.
  • Gary1984Gary1984 Forumite
    125 posts
    Sixth Anniversary 100 Posts
    Horses for courses though. I lived in Dublin for three years and loved it but I don't really give a toss about shopping to be fair. What did like however was:
    - good restaurants/pubs,
    - lots of parks/beaches
    - Some very picturesque suburbs for day trips including Howth, Dun Laoghaire, Dalkey, Malahide
    - It's a very attractive city to just wander around with a real sense of history
    - Close access to places like the Wicklow Hills for cycling and hiking.
    - Lots of big sporting events including GAA which is brilliant.
    - It's quite a small island as well so we did lots of weekends away to Cork, Galway, Donegal, Kerry, Antrim, etc etc.
    - Lots of jobs in insurance including contracting opportunities
    - I found the people very agreeable. I didn't notice any hostility at all but maybe it's easier being a Celt than a European?
    - It's a good size city from my point of view. I don't think I'd want to live somewhere as big as London.

    If I wasn't now settled with a family in Scotland and things didn't change politically here I would have definitely considered moving back. It will be interesting to see if there's much in the way of migration from the UK to Ireland over the coming years.
  • HAMISH_MCTAVISHHAMISH_MCTAVISH Forumite
    28.6K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    GreatApe wrote: »
    Go long Irish property!!

    Maybe...
    Herzlos wrote: »
    Eire will get a population boost but it'll be from Brits moving back into the EU.

    I'd agree with that.

    It's certainly had a Citizenship boost in the last couple of years.

    But back to the OP the real one to watch out for here depending on how the final deal shakes up is Northern Ireland.

    If it continues to have more or less unrestricted access to the Single Market versus the rest of the UK having significantly worse access, then it could have quite the boom in incoming investment and jobs as companies relocate from England to preserve the highly valuable single market access they currently enjoy but that is likely to end under Boris.
    “The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie – deliberate, contrived, and dishonest – but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic.

    Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought.”

    -- President John F. Kennedy”
  • GreatApeGreatApe
    4.5K posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    Maybe...


    How times change

    Ireland property prices have almost doubled over the last 6-7 years

    I was one of the few saying Ireland still had a shortage of properties which imo has been confirmed

    I think the next 10 years will see Ireland population go up more than any other 10 year period partly due to Brexit causing English speaking EU migrants to go from a pool of 70 million (UK + Ireland) to a pool of less than 5 million (just Ireland)
  • ThrugelmirThrugelmir Forumite
    76K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭✭✭
    GreatApe wrote: »
    I was one of the few saying Ireland still had a shortage of properties which imo has been confirmed

    Affordable housing yes. If you want a 4 bed detached holiday home there's no shortage at all.
    "The human understanding when it has once adopted an opinion ... draws all things else to support and agree with it." - Francis Bacon (1561 – 1626)
  • GreatApeGreatApe
    4.5K posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    Thrugelmir wrote: »
    Affordable housing yes. If you want a 4 bed detached holiday home there's no shortage at all.


    Price is a mix of a hundred different factors

    Fundamentally as the world ages and demographics and lifestyles change we need about 1 home for 1.9 people perhaps even more

    So almost everywhere in the world still has a shortage of homes including Ireland and the UK


    The UK is expected to grow to 73 million people by 2040 and we will need 38 million homes for them. That means we are short 9 million homes in the UK. We don't need 9 million all today but we do need 9 million over the next 20 years. 450,000 homes a year on average. I doubt we will hit those figures sustained so the shortage of homes will continue

    This is the same argument I made a decade ago
    Any overproduction of homes will be covered very quickly by population growth and the changes in how people live.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Quick links

Essential Money | Who & Where are you? | Work & Benefits | Household and travel | Shopping & Freebies | About MSE | The MoneySavers Arms | Covid-19 & Coronavirus Support