End of No Fault Evictions?

edited 15 April 2019 at 1:17AM in House Buying, Renting & Selling
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edited 15 April 2019 at 1:17AM in House Buying, Renting & Selling
I hope this is true.., finally. Will it reduce tenancies? I hope not.
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2019/04/14/landlords-will-no-longer-able-evict-tenants-short-notice-plans/

The above article is brief, this explains more in spite of being from the Daily Mail lolhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6922103/PM-launches-crackdown-landlords-evict-tenants-short-notice-without-reason.html

Reading the actual article though, there is to be a consultation period, no laws yet.
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  • edited 15 April 2019 at 5:00AM
    fishpondfishpond Forumite
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    edited 15 April 2019 at 5:00AM
    I assume this government wants to demolish the prs, they are certainly trying very hard.
    Then most tenants will be living in council owned properties(if there are any left), and councils, as we know, do not abide by many, if any of the current rules that the prs has to abide by, instead they appear to make up rules to suit themselves as they bimble along.
    I wonder why councils have so little housing stock left?

    deannatrois, Why do you hope these articles are true, what do you stand to gain?
    I am a LandLord,(under review) so there!:p
  • MurphybearMurphybear Forumite
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    fishpond wrote: »
    I assume this government wants to demolish the prs, they are certainly trying very hard.
    Then most tenants will be living in council owned properties(if there are any left), and councils, as we know, do not abide by many, if any of the current rules that the prs has to abide by, instead they appear to make up rules to suit themselves as they bimble along.
    I wonder why councils have so little housing stock left?

    deannatrois, Why do you hope these articles are true, what do you stand to gain?

    Not heard this expression before. It’s lovely :D

    I think the non fault evictions could be a 2 edged sword. Don’t they have this in Scotland?
  • quantumlobsterquantumlobster Forumite
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    For people who'd rather not give clicks to the Mail or Telegraph, here's the story at The Guardian.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/apr/15/short-notice-evictions-face-axe-in-tenant-rights-victory
  • Roland_SausageRoland_Sausage Forumite
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    My wife is in the process of inheriting a property from a relative who owned her property outright and recently died.

    Since we don't desperately need the money at the moment, we were considering renting it out, with the option to sell it in the future should the need arise.

    We would keep the property as a safety net which could be sold should life take an unexpected turn, ie we lose our jobs through illness, redundancy, etc, or somehow end up homeless and need somewhere else to live. You just can't predict how life will turn out.

    This proposal seems to take away this safety net, by effectively giving any tenant lifetime rights to the property.

    Now I'm wondering whether it's worth the hassle of renting it out, and whether we should just sell it now and sit on the pile of cash.
  • babyblade41babyblade41 Forumite
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    My wife is in the process of inheriting a property from a relative who owned her property outright and recently died.

    Since we don't desperately need the money at the moment, we were considering renting it out, with the option to sell it in the future should the need arise.

    We would keep the property as a safety net which could be sold should life take an unexpected turn, ie we lose our jobs through illness, redundancy, etc, or somehow end up homeless and need somewhere else to live. You just can't predict how life will turn out.

    This proposal seems to take away this safety net, by effectively giving any tenant lifetime rights to the property.

    Now I'm wondering whether it's worth the hassle of renting it out, and whether we should just sell it now and sit on the pile of cash.

    I think selling would be a good idea. Being a LL is hard work and not that profitable ..there are better ways to invest than property.

    Thankfully I retired from being a FT LL with just one with a long standing tenant and won't need the property to sell .

    Removing section 21 is a wrong decision IMO and won't help tenant or LL in the long run
  • quantumlobsterquantumlobster Forumite
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    This proposal seems to take away this safety net, by effectively giving any tenant lifetime rights to the property.
    It does no such thing. Landlords will still be able to evict in the event of needing to sell or live in the property. What you can't do under the proposal is evict people "just cuz", which is what S21 facilitates.

    Section 8 is there for when there's fault on the part of the tenant, and that's not changing.
  • edited 15 April 2019 at 6:37AM
    Norman_CastleNorman_Castle Forumite
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    edited 15 April 2019 at 6:37AM
    We would keep the property as a safety net which could be sold should life take an unexpected turn, ie we lose our jobs through illness, redundancy, etc, or somehow end up homeless and need somewhere else to live.

    This proposal seems to take away this safety net, by effectively giving any tenant lifetime rights to the property.
    This proposal provides a safety net to private tenants. It may not be in your favour but as you said, "You just can't predict how life will turn out". Imagine being a tenant living without the security of tenure or a spare home.

    Private landlords need to accept responsibility for their tenants, not just view them as a source of income. Responsible landlords shouldn't be harmed by these proposed changes.
    I'm not a cat.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Forumite
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    How will this effect me ?


    I bought a rental flat as part of my retirement planning 15yrs ago and will retire in 3 years when I plan to sell the flat.


    My current tenant has been in situ for 8 yrs without problem and at the moment everything is ticking along.


    Will I be required to give notice now, will I never be able to give notice as she is without fault or what happens.


    Personally I think another piece of legislation will deter good landlords as for a lot of people they are not professional multiple house owners but like me the person wanting a variety of investment vehicles.


    Bad landlords will just make life as difficult for tenants as possible and hope they move out of their own accord.
  • davidmcndavidmcn Forumite
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    BBH123 wrote: »
    I bought a rental flat as part of my retirement planning 15yrs ago and will retire in 3 years when I plan to sell the flat.

    Will I be required to give notice now, will I never be able to give notice as she is without fault or what happens.
    As discussed above, you'll (almost certainly) be able to give notice if you want to sell the property.

    We already have similar provisions in Scotland, and the sky hasn't fallen.
  • saajan_12saajan_12 Forumite
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    It does no such thing. Landlords will still be able to evict in the event of needing to sell or live in the property. What you can't do under the proposal is evict people "just cuz", which is what S21 facilitates.

    Section 8 is there for when there's fault on the part of the tenant, and that's not changing.

    The thing is Section 21 isn't just used to evict "just cuz". Why would a logical landlord do themselves out of consistent rent from a good tenant? Its usually because the tenant has breached terms but in a way thats difficult to prove for a Section 8 discretionary ground where the judge can decide subjectively, eg keeping pets, haphazard rent payments, nuisance to neighbours, overcrowding, property destruction etc.
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