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washing machine for over 70s

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washing machine for over 70s

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Over 50s Money Saving
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chelseafan06chelseafan06 Forumite
7 posts
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Over 50s Money Saving
Hi
Can anyone recommend a washing machine that has basic controls and easy to understand (not all singing and dancing) for my mum who is in her 70s and quite a technophobe. She uses two settings of 40 deg and 60 deg and on the odd occasion might need a quick wash setting. Thank you all in advance. x
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  • grunniegrunnie Forumite
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    When I got my Bosch machine from JLewis I asked the 2 delivery men to set it up to use. I said it looks really complicated and 1 man said his wife just used 1 programme and I asked him to set up the same one for me. I have used that programme for the last 3 years.
    I just need to put in the washing add washing powder and press the on button.
  • badmemorybadmemory Forumite
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    grunnie wrote: »
    When I got my Bosch machine from JLewis I asked the 2 delivery men to set it up to use. I said it looks really complicated and 1 man said his wife just used 1 programme and I asked him to set up the same one for me. I have used that programme for the last 3 years.
    I just need to put in the washing add washing powder and press the on button.
    Whilst mine was delivered by CK our conversation followed yours exactly, since then I've learnt to use the separate spin.
  • pollypennypollypenny Forumite
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    Most people use only one or two settings.

    Anyway, this over 70 is quite capable of reading an instruction booklet, like most others.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Forumite
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    omg, I hope people don`t get despondent, reading the opening post. Being 70 is great, I like many others, have my wits about me. I can read instruction books, wipe a hard disc and re-install windows and can certainly decide what programme to use on a washing machine. Yesterday, I used mine to proof a garment. The day before, a sports wash, to wash my cycling lycra kit. Hang on a minute, I just have to alter my brake cable, following instructions of course. If someone is losing it and cannot read instructions, then for goodness sake just write the relevant instructions clearly, step by step in large letters and stick it by the washing machine
  • badmemorybadmemory Forumite
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    I don't mind instruction booklets, but what I really don't like are those silly little pictures some of them use instead of words. I always need a magnifying glass for those.
  • Savvy_SueSavvy_Sue Forumite
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    I think mine is a Bosch. It has a dial to set the temperature and 'roughness' of the wash, and then a few buttons which affect how long the programme takes, extra spin etc. You turn the dial, press the buttons you want, then Start.

    I use two programmes regularly, one for 'normal' stuff and a hotter one for sheets and towels. These are both one side of the dial. If I don't switch the machine off between washes, the programme stays on the same one for the next wash, just have to press the start button.

    If I needed to, I'd get a permanent marker and draw a line on the dial to show how far to turn it, and draw a ring round the extra buttons I press.

    However, there can still be pitfalls. I had CL showing on the display and had no idea what that meant. Had to find the book of words. It's for Child Lock: I'd accidentally switched that facility on, and now needed to switch it off again.

    But I'd be surprised if you could get a machine without a CL facility ...
    Still knitting!
    Completed: TWO adult cardigans, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees, 2 sets of handwarmers, 1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 3 balaclavas, multiple hats and poppies, 3 peony flowers, 4 butterflies ...
    Current projects: pink balaclava (for myself), seaman's hat, about to start another cardigan!
  • badmemorybadmemory Forumite
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    Savvy_Sue wrote: »
    I think mine is a Bosch.

    But I'd be surprised if you could get a machine without a CL facility ...


    I really hope you can't even if you normally have no children on the premises it should still be available (& may be needed at some time with respect to dementia).


    Mine is a Bosch & is really easy to figure out. One button change the temp, another button change the spin speed. In 50 years of owning washing machines this is the easiiest to "programme".
  • SnowbirdSnowbird Forumite
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    kittie wrote: »
    omg, I hope people don`t get despondent, reading the opening post.
    Was that really necessary?
    And those who "thanked" that post! Shame on you.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Forumite
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    MoneySaving Newbie
    oh dear, are you really in that group snowbird? the age 70+ who cannot read instructions. In that case I am very sorry and maybe you need to have a brief resume of the relevant instructions written by your nearest and dearest.

    For those who are not yet 70, that particular age is is a pretty difficult psychological barrier to overcome, too many younger people assume that reaching 70 means an end to active mental faculties and those nearing 70 need to be aware that 70 is only a number. Most of us remain astute and mentally vibrant. Ageism has no place in our society today
  • pollypennypollypenny Forumite
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    Snowbird wrote: »
    Was that really necessary?
    And those who "thanked" that post! Shame on you.



    I am 71, most of my friends are around the same. We are full of life, busy, some looking after grandchildren as well as volunteering for various charities and enjoying leisure activities.

    One friend retires from teaching today - 72! My role model is my friend and neighbour who is 89!

    We do not go into a dotage at an arbitrary age. 70 is middle aged these days.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
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