Child DLA, non-UK wife is carer

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Disability Money Matters
3 replies 1.1K views
LamplighterLamplighter Forumite
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Disability Money Matters
Hi there

I'm a UK citizen, in full-time employment as a higher-rate tax payer. My wife of 8 years is a foreign national on a UK resident visa (FLR). This visa permits her to work, but no access to public funds.

Our four-year-old son, also a UK citizen, is autistic. He has just been awarded middle-rate care allowance, and will receive lower rate mobility once he turns five.

My wife cannot work because of the care needs of our son, but doesn't meet the qualifying criteria for e.g. carer's allowance. She supports him day and night outside of his school timetable.

Given all the above, and assuming my wife has no entitlement to any benefit on account of her visa status, is there anything beyond the DLA that either my son or I might be able to claim, financial or otherwise.

Any help, advice or guidance would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you

Replies

  • Hi there

    I'm a UK citizen, in full-time employment as a higher-rate tax payer. My wife of 8 years is a foreign national on a UK resident visa (FLR). This visa permits her to work, but no access to public funds.

    Our four-year-old son, also a UK citizen, is autistic. He has just been awarded middle-rate care allowance, and will receive lower rate mobility once he turns five.

    My wife cannot work because of the care needs of our son, but doesn't meet the qualifying criteria for e.g. carer's allowance. She supports him day and night outside of his school timetable.

    Given all the above, and assuming my wife has no entitlement to any benefit on account of her visa status, is there anything beyond the DLA that either my son or I might be able to claim, financial or otherwise.

    Any help, advice or guidance would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you

    Do you claim tax credits? Even if not entitled previously apply because when a child gets DLA there is a premium applied which might mean you're entitled to a small amount now.
  • Hi Shel
    Thanks for the reply - I had a look and I'm still not eligible for tax credits as I'm above the threshold, including with the disabled child.
  • kingfisherbluekingfisherblue Forumite
    9.2K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Xmas Saver!
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    If your son enjoys the cinema (and many have a disability screening once a month), you could get him the CEA card, This means that you pay for his ticket, but a carer goes free. Some attractions also allow one carer to go free. You usually need a copy of your son's DLA letter to prove eligibility.

    If you have an additional kitchen or bathroom for your son's needs, you can also have your council tax dropped down by one band. (This is also the case for anyone needing to use a wheelchair indoors, but it doesn't sound relevant in your case).
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