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Neighbourhood kids swearing and behavior annoying us

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  • Hedgehog99
    Hedgehog99 Posts: 1,425 Forumite
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    The police take swearing seriously when it's used against them, so they should when a member of the public is suffering it.

    I feel very sorry for you, being treated this way. The police and council should take your and your neighbours' complaints seriously.

    Hope you can get this sorted, especially with the school hols coming up.

    The most revolting thing anyone has ever said to me was said by a feral kid on his bike - can only have been seven at the most. Why are these kids allowed to think they can behave like that to adults minding their own business?
  • Guest101
    Guest101 Posts: 15,764 Forumite
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    Hedgehog99 wrote: »
    The police take swearing seriously when it's used against them, so they should when a member of the public is suffering it. - no they don't. at best it's a s.5 public order offence, which requires the constable to issue a warning not to use that language again.

    I feel very sorry for you, being treated this way. The police and council should take your and your neighbours' complaints seriously.

    Hope you can get this sorted, especially with the school hols coming up.

    The most revolting thing anyone has ever said to me was said by a feral kid on his bike - can only have been seven at the most. Why are these kids allowed to think they can behave like that to adults minding their own business?
    because of a lack of stability and education most likely.
  • FredG
    FredG Posts: 213 Forumite
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    Guest101 wrote: »
    I guess that was my initial point. It's quite sad really that adults are afraid of children.


    I think it's dependent on the individual and the group of kids. I'm a pretty big guy, trained numerous martial arts for a number of years and grew up on a pretty rough estate, am I going to say to someone who may be the polar opposite of me that unequivocally NO adult should be scare of ANY child?


    Mike Tyson was 220lbs at 15. I'd be scared of that kid now.
  • Tygermoth
    Tygermoth Posts: 1,413 Forumite
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    edited 12 July 2017 at 8:12PM
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    We are having the same problem – I think it’s because kids know they are untouchable and their parents will back them regardless.

    Currently the kids on our really lovely little estate have a little game going on. They have taken to barricading or blocking roads with bins or bikes and hiding - throwing stones, mud or rubbish when unsuspecting people get out of their cars to move the bikes – then leg it screaming insults and obscenities.

    When one guy recognised one of the gang and went to speak (quite civilly) to its mother the kids on mass accused the dude of assaulting one of the lads. Police were involved, as the mother was rabidly pushing the poor guy be charged. He was really worried he was going to end up in real trouble, lose your job kind of trouble.

    Luckily for him he had a dash cam – though the mother is still yelling all over facebook that her precious baby wouldn’t lie and the man had no right to accuse him. Now all the kids are throwing poop at his door and his car has been damaged on a number of occasions.

    This is where things have changed – my mother would have killed me stone dead if I brought someone to our door.
    Please note I have a cognitive disability - as such my wording can be a bit off, muddled, misspelt or in some cases i can miss out some words totally...
  • badmemory
    badmemory Posts: 7,978 Forumite
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    We should all know what "sins" our children are likely to commit. My son's were mostly errors of omission not commission. As for me, just about anything to keep me off my parents radar. I am still grateful to Mr Lowe my junior 3 teacher who gave me the strap (deserved in that era) and did not tell my father a teacher at the same school.

    But these children are children not adults & we (as parents) are there to teach them right from wrong & that if you do something wrong there are (or should be) consequences. I wonder if the parents letting them behave like this will blame the "system" when their little darling lands up in jail.
  • Teapot55
    Teapot55 Posts: 743 Forumite
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    Tygermoth wrote: »
    We are having the same problem . . . the kids en masse accused the dude of assaulting one of the lads. Police were involved, as the mother was rabidly pushing the poor guy be charged. He was really worried he was going to end up in real trouble, lose your job kind of trouble.

    My late mother-in-law was so well-regarded by people in her area that they had to open the balcony in the parish church to accommodate everyone that turned up for her funeral, and a lot of them were young parents with their children . . . BUT only a few short years earlier, when she was about eighty years old, she had been informally warned by the local police officer NOT to offer the conkers she had picked up in the park to children passing her house. (The parents really had called the police).

    Keep a good six foot back from other people's children nowadays and never, ever be in a situation where you are alone with a young person under eighteen . . .

    :(

    would've . . . could've . . . should've . . .


    A.A.A.S. (Associate of the Acronym Abolition Society)

    There's definitely no 'a' in 'definitely'.
  • Guest101
    Guest101 Posts: 15,764 Forumite
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    Teapot55 wrote: »
    My late mother-in-law was so well-regarded by people in her area that they had to open the balcony in the parish church to accommodate everyone that turned up for her funeral, and a lot of them were young parents with their children . . . BUT only a few short years earlier, when she was about eighty years old, she had been informally warned by the local police officer NOT to offer the conkers she had picked up in the park to children passing her house. (The parents really had called the police).

    Keep a good six foot back from other people's children nowadays and never, ever be in a situation where you are alone with a young person under eighteen . . .

    :(
    You realise the police had no legal authority to request her to cooperate? and that there is no law regarding contact with children in such a manner?
  • Teapot55
    Teapot55 Posts: 743 Forumite
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    Guest101 wrote: »
    You realise the police had no legal authority to request her to cooperate? and that there is no law regarding contact with children in such a manner?

    I would rather be safe than sorry, all the same!

    would've . . . could've . . . should've . . .


    A.A.A.S. (Associate of the Acronym Abolition Society)

    There's definitely no 'a' in 'definitely'.
  • Guest101
    Guest101 Posts: 15,764 Forumite
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    Teapot55 wrote: »
    I would rather be safe than sorry, all the same!
    You can be whatever you like. im simply stating a fact
  • unholyangel
    unholyangel Posts: 16,863 Forumite
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    Hedgehog99 wrote: »
    The police take swearing seriously when it's used against them, so they should when a member of the public is suffering it.

    I feel very sorry for you, being treated this way. The police and council should take your and your neighbours' complaints seriously.

    Hope you can get this sorted, especially with the school hols coming up.

    The most revolting thing anyone has ever said to me was said by a feral kid on his bike - can only have been seven at the most. Why are these kids allowed to think they can behave like that to adults minding their own business?

    Not anymore they can't. There was a judgement from the courts in which the judge giving their ruling basically said a police officer who feels alarm/distress at being swore at was unfit for duty given what their job entails. While the courts have come up with some weird & wonderful judgements in their time, I can't say I disagree with the logic in that one.

    Courts are less likely to apply that part of the public order act to children though - the law is remarkably lenient on kids just because they're under 18.
    You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means - Inigo Montoya, The Princess Bride
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