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The sewing thread

edited 9 December 2016 at 11:17PM in Old Style MoneySaving
1.2K replies 130K views
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  • Emm-in-a-pickleEmm-in-a-pickle Forumite
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    Scarlet Pixie you were lucky with the school sewing - a couple of us who were already making our own clothes were made to go at the same starters` pace as the class, we produced ONE garment per term, and really did not learn anything more than the actual pattern taught us anyway. We were given the pattern number and each had to buy one, the only individuality was in our choice of fabric. We had to do diagrams (copied from blackboard which was usually copied from the pattern!!) at each stage and write what we had done. Deadly boring, one year of that was quite enough.
    Luxor, my mum was self-taught and made all my stuff when I was little, I mostly remember little seersucker dresses with twirly skirts and thinking I had the cleverest mum in the world....until she fancied having a go at millinery. Some of the hats she made for me and made me wear them for Sunday School, I still cringe at the memory. I am still not a hat person!
  • monnagranmonnagran Forumite
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    csarina, my grandmother was a t ailoress also and heaven help you should anyone should refer to her as a dressmaker. she specialised in military dress uniforms. my great grandfather was far ahead of his time and was determined that his 3 daughters should be able to support themselves if necessary. Quite remarkable for a Victorian gentleman. Nan was apprenticed to a tailor, one sister to a milliner and I can't remember about the third.
    All my clothes were handmade or knitted (except the horrible liberty bodices) and I've spoken somewhere before about the wonderful coat and skirt she made me from my father's cricketing f lannels while he was away fighting for king and country. His reaction when he found out was not recorded.

    My mother was an excellent dressmaker too. She made the most delightful smocked dresses for me when I was little. So I grew up amid the sounds of whirring treadle machines and spending hours standing on a chair while the grownups fussed around measuring hems, with a mouthful of pins.

    Me? Well, in the first year at grammar school we were started off by having to make our own science overall. Beginning with making the pattern.
    I had actually given up science long before the overall was finished which was just as well as it was the most peculiar shape, quite apart from being far too small.
    However, I must have absorbed something by osmosis because once I was married to a husband who didn't think that I needed any money for myself, I found that with an ancient hand operated singer and working on the floor, I could turn out quite passable clothes myself. Well, it was either that or do the shopping in my wedding dress.


    I was not bad. I even produced a much admired matching lined coat and skirt. I never really enjoyed it though.

    I have recently invested in a second hand machine, not for making clothes but for householdy stuff like lining curtains and mending. I fancy patchwork as well.

    A little while ago, when I had a bit of money, I bought myself a hellishly expensive embroidery machine. I took one look at the instruction manual and put the machine straight back in the box. It is all computerised and I am to computer technology as King Herod was to child minding (not my phrase, I read it somewhere).

    However, I am hoping to move this year and will have more time to shed blood, tears and sweat over the wretched machine.

    Watch this space.
    x
    I believe that friends are quiet angels
    Who lift us to our feet when our wings
    Have trouble remembering how to fly.
  • westcoastscotwestcoastscot Forumite
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    I sew a lot - still using an old treadle machine I inherited. I had a small business at one point making kilts and highland dancing outfits, including knitted hose, but now I mostly make clothing for me, household stuff and do any repairs etc on it.
    I also handsew - redwork, tapestry and little things - it's very relaxing.

    Fuddle - you could hand quilt your quilt - either with running stitch, or spot stitching, or you could add buttons at intervals - very easy to do and very relaxing - happy to talk you through it when you get there if you wish :)

    I taught all mine to sew, boys and girl, when they were old enough to reach the treadle - thought it was safer. When they were younger and I was sewing for all of us I used the bundle method, working in batches. I got a surprising amount done!

    Lovely thread! WCS
  • loocylooloocyloo Forumite
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    I used to sew a lot as a child, and did needlework for O level! I carried on sewing, and as I worked as a nanny, frequently made dresses and sunhats, pinafores and very simple trousers for the children ( lol makes me sound like Maria in sound of music! but I never used anyones curtains! )
    I also made dresses, skirts and trousers for myself.


    I did make curtains, and table cloths and all sorts of things.


    I nannied overseas, and used to borrow my bosses sewing machine. when I left to return home and get married - she gave me the money to buy myself a good sewing machine!


    but once I had my own children, I never seemed to have the time and got out of the habit. Although I did and still do make fleece blankets for all the babies I know! and have made random costumes.


    I've started doing a little bit more, but I need to get my machine serviced as its 18 yrs old and was last serviced probably about 10 yrs ago! and apart from sewing straight lines, I've sort of forgotten how! ( and I'm a bit scared of doing anything fitted )


    DD needs a simple waistcoat for a drama piece, and I have one that is about the right shape & size, so I am planning on cutting out 2 backs, 2 left fronts, 2 right fronts and sewing each back/left&right front together, and then sewing them together and turning them inside out and hand sewing up the gap! that way I don't have to hem/bind the edges and it doesn't need buttons, just a bit of ribbon! does that sound as if it will work?wish me luck!
  • fuddlefuddle Users Awaiting Email Confirmation
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    Thank you WCS :) I would like to bend your ear when the time comes. I do like the idea. It means I could have some control too. I did fancy quiting hearts in the squares and immediately poo poo'd the idea because of the lack of machine skills. If I hand stitch I could have control couldn't I :D

    Just thinking then, is there anything I can mark fabric with that won't stain afterwards? Chalk maybe? Is there a tool that sewers of the sewing ilk use... not DynoRod :D
  • edited 9 December 2016 at 8:06PM
    westcoastscotwestcoastscot Forumite
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    edited 9 December 2016 at 8:06PM
    Fuddle hearts would be lovely. You can buy pens that fade like the linky below but I've never gotten on with one yet - I use a pencil and draw either around something or freehand, and then stitch over it. I can rub out anything left visible, although as I work on it, it usually fades away anyway! You can send your quilt top away to be quilted, but I've never fancied that, as like doing it myself.
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hemline-H295-Wipe-Fabric-Marker/dp/B003KBN4ZY/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1481310111&sr=8-4&keywords=fabric+marker

    edited to add: loocyloo that would work fine - if the sides are straight you could shorten the work by cutting the sides and backs all in one piece, sew the two together leaving the shoulders open and turn it through that? Then you'd just need to sew the shoulders up?
  • edited 9 December 2016 at 11:33PM
    [Deleted User][Deleted User]
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    MoneySaving Newbie
    edited 9 December 2016 at 11:33PM
    kathrynha wrote: »
    Thanks Kittie, that's really helpful. I will have to see if I can manage to make something similar

    it is quite a good confidence maker, actually seeing myself as a bodyform made me realise that I was not as bad as I imagined. Yes plump and overweight but cuddly too

    fuddle, thanks, did it re the title :o:)

    I have to keep going back a page, I cannot do multi quotes, be patient with me

    cheap and excellent sewing patterns, drafted to your own measurements, allow seam allowances and not really for beginners
    http://www.lekala.co/
    You have to print them out as pieces of A4 and stick them together but they do work

    and this one is excellent for multi patterns. Each size is in a different colour and they are all on one page so it looks hard but is very good once you get your eye in. My first attempt was a super parka coat for me. It turned out extremely well and I wear it a lot
    http://www.dotsnstripes.co.uk/category_open.cfm?id=123&menu1=121&menu2=122

    The childrens designs are absolutely stunning and multi sized so is a very cheap pattern source

    I am going back to reading the posts now
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User]
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    MoneySaving Newbie
    kittie wrote: »
    it is quite a good confidence maker, actually seeing myself as a bodyform made me realise that I was not as bad as I imagined. Yes plump and overweight but cuddly too

    fuddle, thanks, did it re the title :o:)

    I have to keep going back a page, I cannot do multi quotes, be patient with me

    cheap and excellent sewing patterns, drafted to your own measurements, allow seam allowances and not really for beginners
    http://www.lekala.co/
    You have to print them out as pieces of A4 and stick them together but they do work

    and this one is excellent for multi patterns. Each size is in a different colour and they are all on one page so it looks hard but is very good once you get your eye in. My first attempt was a super parka coat for me. It turned out extremely well and I wear it a lot
    http://www.dotsnstripes.co.uk/category_open.cfm?id=123&menu1=121&menu2=122

    The childrens designs are absolutely stunning and multi sized so is a very cheap pattern source

    I am going back to reading the posts now
    I did multi qotes, you just click that balloon thing
    jackyann wrote: »
    I was wondering about cashmerette patterns,as they seem expensive, but was recommended them, and have found them excellent!
    They also remind me of the old type of patterns that last and last.

    I just bought some, not made them yet. I particularly like the shirts with non-gaping fronts
  • nannygladysnannygladys Forumite
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    Hi everyone, another one here that did a needlework o-level, and then carried it on dressing myself and two small children as there wasnt much money about and material and knitting wool was quite cheap and plentiful. How times gave changed.

    I retired a couple of years ago and treated myself to a new machine and turned my smallest bedroom into a craft room, I have recently started making cards and boxes - mainly for Xmas but I'm really enjoying that as well.

    I haven't made much for myself because I don't conform to any standard size but one of my new years resolutions is to try again - I Will make a dress and skirt that fit!!!!

    I also make home bits and pieces and done a couple of small quilts and EPP. I have made a couple of bags and purses for the dgds for Xmas put them in hm boxes and made them cards, not sure if they will like them but I enjoyed making them.

    Glad this thread has got going
    Nannyg
    Frugal challenge 2020
    Sealed pot 13 no.31
    Emergency fund 268.95/1000
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User]
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    MoneySaving Newbie
    wow, I am loving this thread, it is exciting tbh. My mother was a super dressmaker and drafted all her own patterns. They had so many skills in those days

    I have a sewing room as there is only me and my machines are all out but I only had one machine when the children were at home and that had to be put away. Making curtains is a great money saver but requires patience. I used to spread the fabric out on the floor to get the pattern matching and the measurements right.

    The feeling I am getting is that this sewing craft has been lying dormant in a lot of people and it is bursting out again. I hope so
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