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Have you suffered from not having a will? Tell us

edited 4 November 2016 at 10:04AM in Marriage, Relationships & Families
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  • A will is definitely something everyone should consider. I was always under the impression that I would have to keep updating it the more assets I owned.
    I'm guessing this is something a solicitor should really do, it would be good if writing the document myself would be safe enough.
    The best preparation for tomorrow is doing your best today
  • MojisolaMojisola Forumite
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    A will is definitely something everyone should consider. I was always under the impression that I would have to keep updating it the more assets I owned.

    I'm guessing this is something a solicitor should really do, it would be good if writing the document myself would be safe enough.

    If the same people are going to inherit from you, you don't need to keep updating it. There's no need to list properties exactly or savings accounts, etc. In fact, this can cause problems. Just have general clauses that distribute whatever assets you have to whoever you want.

    A good will covers future possibilities, such as the death of your beneficiaries so that you can say what should happen to their share.

    It is important to review your will regularly but it may not need updating unless something major has changed in your life.
  • edited 31 January 2017 at 3:30PM
    ukwmoukwmo Forumite
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    edited 31 January 2017 at 3:30PM
    My wee Scottish granny had dementia and was placed into a long stay NHS hospital. We broke up her home. Gran transferred her considerable savings to my Mum (my Gran's Daughter) when the power of attorney paperwork was finally drawn up (and that's another story).

    Shortly thereafter Mum was diagnosed with stomach cancer. Mum & Dad had agreed with each other, years ago, that if either was to be diagnosed with a terrible illness that neither wanted to know just how badly ill they were.

    So Mum wasn't told there was no hope, that the cancer was too far gone. And Dad was too chicken hearted to mention about the need to make a will. He was completely focussed on looking after Mum, with me trying my best to help him, visit Gran in hospital, then Mum in hers, whilst me still trying to maintain a full time job.

    Mum died. She had her own money in her bank account, plus Granny's. Nearly 6 figures. But no will. Unsure why, Scottish law maybe, but myself and my Brother had to renounce any claims to mum's estate in order that Dad could inherit Mum's savings and belongings.

    Dad had to attend court in front of a Sheriff, so that the paperwork could be sorted out. He cried from the minute he walked through that court door until we finally got him home.

    Please. Make a will. It saves so much grief later on.
  • Nick_CNick_C Forumite
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    Not everyone needs to make a will. But if you do, make sure it is lodged somewhere safe. When my mum died, I searched high and low for a will, but couldn't find anything, although she had previously told me she had made one.

    If you have been married more than once and have children, all the more reason to lodge the will in a safe place. When my grandfather dies, his second wife tore up the will. The same thing happened to a friend of mine.

    Personally, I have no children or living parents, and want my entire estate to pass to my spouse on my death, so living in England there is no need to make a will. Administering a simple estate under the rules of intestacy is straightforward.
  • In all honesty, we'd have done it quicker, cheaper, easier, if there'd been no wills at all.

    None of my dad's family made (or make) Wills. They "don't believe in it"

    When dad passed away unexpectedly (and intestate) there was quite a bit of faffing around, with regard to his finances, but that may have been due to his poor money management skills and leaving debts, rather than him not having a Will..

    Neither myself nor my OH have assets, nor Wills.
  • BJVBJV Forumite
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    Never had a will never thought I needed it. My OH runs a hotel and a young man came in to book a funeral. OH thought must be for parents.

    Transpired that it was for his 35 year old wife who had died suddenly ( hemorrhage in her sleep) Left two young children, no life insurance for her ( was main carer for children ).

    Hubby now devastated has two young children to look after and had lots of problems sorting everything out.

    We now have much more life insurance, two wills. Hope I don't have to use either for a very very long time but would like to think that the people left behind could spend the time remembering me rather than worrying about bills or how the estate should be split.
    Happiness, Health and Wealth in that order please!:A
  • MojisolaMojisola Forumite
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    ukwmo wrote: »
    Gran transferred her considerable savings to my Mum (my Gran's Daughter) when the power of attorney paperwork was finally drawn up (and that's another story).

    Please. Make a will. It saves so much grief later on.

    Absolutely agree with making a will - but a POA should never mix up the donor's money with their own.
  • Robin9Robin9 Forumite
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    Nick_C wrote: »
    Not everyone needs to make a will. But if you do, make sure it is lodged somewhere safe. When my mum died, I searched high and low for a will, but couldn't find anything, although she had previously told me she had made one.

    If you have been married more than once and have children, all the more reason to lodge the will in a safe place. When my grandfather dies, his second wife tore up the will. The same thing happened to a friend of mine.

    Personally, I have no children or living parents, and want my entire estate to pass to my spouse on my death, so living in England there is no need to make a will. Administering a simple estate under the rules of intestacy is straightforward.
    Have you thought about what happens should your spouse die first ?
    Never pay on an estimated bill
  • Nick_CNick_C Forumite
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    Robin9 wrote: »
    Have you thought about what happens should your spouse die first ?

    If he dies first then I will make a will, but with an 18 year age difference that's unlikely. And if we die together in an accident then I am deemed to have died first anyway being the elder.
  • MojisolaMojisola Forumite
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    Nick_C wrote: »
    If he dies first then I will make a will, but with an 18 year age difference that's unlikely. And if we die together in an accident then I am deemed to have died first anyway being the elder.

    If you die together, he won't inherit from you.

    Both of your estates will be divided up among more distant relatives according to the intestate rules.
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